Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,549 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Orange Box
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,549 game reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Given the power at the player's fingertips to rewind, pause, fast forward and even record time, the scope for creating some genuinely engaging and ingenious situations is still as immense as it ever was. But, in actuality, everything is blandly obvious and ironically one-dimensional, and the use of the rewind function is still as chronological as it ever was. [Jan 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Constantine's narrative is compelling enough, and some excellent puzzles save it from the ignominy of being yet another average third-person movie tie-in, but only just... Yes it's uncomplicated, but still an engaging realisation of the source material. [Apr 2005, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sadly, encounters with enemy AI - particularly in combat - are by far the weakest link in an otherwise enjoyable effort. [Apr 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    After the interesting and confident debut of The Suffering last year, Ties That Bind remains a straightforward action game, and one with a coherent story that feels well paced, if too full of schlocky cliché for some. But that is, ultimately, all it does: remains. [Dec 2005, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As chaotic and unrefined as it is, however, it motors on with a definite sense of purpose and provides a solid sense of fulfilment, if not necessarily one of accomplishment. [Christmas 2005, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Did a purse-holder at Activision one day grapple fruitlessly with the last game's control system and scrawl in their subsequent notes "Make the next one so that I can play it"? Speculation aside, someone sure messed-up Spider-Man. [Dec 2005, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gun
    Why roam freely (when the game lets you, which is by no means always) when all that's out there to find is an empty trek between jarring episodes of production-line gaming? [Christmas 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Destroy All Humans 2 is initially enjoyable, entirely endurable and gratifyingly easy. But at its heart it remains an average experience. [Dec 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On retreading the levels enemy attacks become predictable puppet shows, with mad-eyed soldiers lining up to get killed exactly where they did many times before. It's the kind of repetition more commonly associated with lightgun games these days. [Christmas 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rarely does dying feel like the player's fault and, in typical "Sonic Adventure" fashion, the best bits are when you find that the majority of control has been taken away from you, and you're flung around the world at escape velocity. [Mar 2004, p.105]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Mario Kart isn't a racing game any more. It is a party game, and anyone buying it for anything more than frantic, foolish, social fun will grow tired of being cheated very quickly indeed. [Christmas 2003, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's a certain amount of wit and flair evident throughout Hoodlum Havoc's cut-scenes, and there are certainly some very slick production values. The problem is that, in terms of raw enjoyment, the game is somehow underwhelming. [May 2003, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Power Tennis has depth only insofar as there's a great deal to do – medals to win, records to beat and tournament trophies to hold aloft – but all the frills and gimmicks overcomplicate something that wasn't broken in the first place. [Jan 2005, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Acclaim's latest manages to tick all the required futuristic race sim boxes, except the one titled 'memorable'. There's one really good thing about XGRA - it's all over very quickly. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On retreading the levels enemy attacks become predictable puppet shows, with mad-eyed soldiers lining up to get killed exactly where they did many times before. It's the kind of repetition more commonly associated with lightgun games these days. [Christmas 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Away from the restrictions enforced by the licence the game improves. Free Roam gives you unlimited access to the excellently designed LA streets and rooftops, while Stunt Mode also takes greater advantage of the exquisite physics engine. But why are there no added incentives such as stunt scoring or accumulators? A missed opportunity. [Oct 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nobody, nobody at all, walks into a game shop and thinks: "Hey, goblins are pretty cool. Today I want to be a goblin." When the goblins in question have been rendered with almost no character or charm, this merely compounds the lack of emotional connection. [Mar 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rarely does dying feel like the player's fault and, in typical "Sonic Adventure" fashion, the best bits are when you find that the majority of control has been taken away from you, and you're flung around the world at escape velocity. [Mar 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's a prevalent fashion at the moment for games to contain a multitude of games styles, a presumption that suggests consumers have become bored of single genre games. But Rogue Squadron III exposes the lie. It's a game that tries too hard to do many things, but only manages to do a few of them well. [Dec 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's perhaps because the title benefits from such a high production spend … that the average design and execution becomes more pronounced. [Mar 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Subtitling this Battle Revolution could be considered a breach of advertising standards; it's about as revolutionary as a racing game with powerslides. But while Custom Robo lacks a fresh hook, it's done with such a diligent simplicity that it's hard not to take a shine to it. [July 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Were spirits to play a game while they waited in Purgatory, surely it would be Mario Party. It can take an age to get to the end, and the minigames are interspersed with a turgid board game section that tests the patience to its limits. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Your main objective is the bane of the modern FPS: follow a little blue arrow while shooting things, with the odd escort or protect responsibility thrown in to make you turn around occasionally. It's average justice dished out to the licence, but nothing more. [Christmas 2003, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Did a purse-holder at Activision one day grapple fruitlessly with the last game's control system and scrawl in their subsequent notes "Make the next one so that I can play it"? Speculation aside, someone sure messed-up Spider-Man. [Dec 2005, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gun
    Why roam freely (when the game lets you, which is by no means always) when all that's out there to find is an empty trek between jarring episodes of production-line gaming? [Christmas 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rogue Agent is the result of design by committee: a safe, reasonably accomplished but uninspiring offering which neither excels nor progresses its genre in any way. [Christmas 2004, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    3DS was the perfect opportunity to take Super Monkey Ball back to its GameCube glory days. Instead we find a game that has spent so many years honouring various types of hardware, it has forgotten its own original aim. [May 2011, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's essentially the slowest side-scrolling shoot 'em up you'll ever play, demanding you laboriously guide a submarine to the end of each level while avoiding damage and destroying evil submarines whose perfidy knows no bounds and warrants no backstory. [June 2011, p.97]
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game's visual and combative energy spark the urge to see where it goes next. If only there was something to do when you get there.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Accentuat[es] Suda's often over-indulgent scriptwriting and accelerat[es] Mikami's brand of horror into a hyper-gothic, shock-free world of bright lights. With a little more restraint and focus on the core experience, Shadows Of The Damned could have been the action thrill ride Garcia Hotspur thinks it is. Instead the game – like Hotspur himself – is all talk.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the air of brutality Space Marine tries to cultivate, it's ultimately defined by convenience; by linear levels where you follow the green lights of unlocked doors from one corridor to the next, while the gentle trickle of upgrades and new weapons does just enough to keep you playing. The result is sometimes casually enjoyable, but never vivid, or memorable, or truly involving.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Gunstringer's biggest problem, however, is that it's a score-based shooter with little incentive to return. With only one weapon type available at any given time, there's none of the tactical interplay between attacks that makes aiming for high scores in Child Of Eden so tempting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    So despite the winner podiums and big sponsorship contracts and – yes – even the hours you'll spend in this askew universe, Grand Prix Story feels more like deja vu than entertainment. The formula is rapidly palling.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's too easy and basic for adults and likely too mellow for children drawn in by its bubbly aesthetic. It's a shame, because Okabu's is a quietly charismatic world, one destined to be overlooked thanks to its grind of an opener and failure to match its visual vigour with mechanics that haven't been used better elsewhere.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A reminder of both what you adore and abhor in a series that's had its simple joys diluted by flash-in-the-plan iterations and ideas.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's becoming a 5th Cell tradition: strong ideas compromised by erratic level design and structural weaknesses. One day, the developer will find the right balance to support its undeniable creativity, but sadly, it hasn't found it here.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Like any good zombie fiction, the real enemy in AZMD! isn't the walking dead, but the humans who created them.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a big game, clocking in at about the 40-hour mark, but the lack of challenge in combat combined with the formulaic missions and frequent cutscenes too often make it feel like a sticky trudge.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gesture recognition is loose and forgiving, and it makes no attempt to suggest Kinect's genuinely interpreting every movement. Instead, each manoeuvre feels like the empty-handed equivalent of pushing a button – albeit a button that tends to idle a little before it triggers anything.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Little Deviants' real problem is simple: it's not moreish, and its challenges fail to reveal the kinds of nuance on the second and third tries that will have you refining strategies and aiming to better scores. Without that incentive to return, you're unlikely to.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a freemium game, masquerading as a paid download.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    SSX
    
In looking outside itself for inspiration, SSX has found a worthy infrastructure to establish an online community and culture. But this same approach has found the brand veering away from some of the fun and fireworks of yesteryear, leaving its more seductive silly side out in the cold.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Balancing real-time action with tactical micro-management proves beyond Vanpool. With arbitrary limitations placed on an already meagre cash supply, and towers and fortifications proving equally flimsy, what little money is available is best poured into single-use items and permanent ability boosts for Dillon.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For all its luxurious visuals, it knows little about how to marry them to gameplay, or how to end the suffering of artists who 
see their work butchered to meet gameplay's demands.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a free download, Frobisher Says may not be a waste of your money, but there are many better diversions on Vita to occupy your time.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A less accomplished but more immediate Ninja Gaiden, then, one that will temporarily distract newcomers and disappoint dedicated followers. Yet it feels destined to be forgotten by both audiences, chalked up as another casualty in the east's drive to conquer the west with bravado rather than its sought-after, ever-rarer Japanese steel.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Crytek's landed on the App Store, then, but it's only half of the company: the wrong half.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The detection of item-grabbing slashes is often fumbled, and since moving your finger can leave you prone to missing punches, it ruins a promising risk-reward system.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The convincing sense of speed is dulled by a lack of weight to the handling, while collisions betray some erratic physics: you can easily be shunted into a respawn by other racers, yet left relatively unscathed by a head-on smash into trees.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    That it largely fails to deliver does not quite snuff out its allure – not, at least, for devotees of the fiction. For those yet to be tempted by Martin's work, however, the blunderous combat, mangled dialoguing and profoundly unlovely looks will make it seem, as a Westerosi idiom goes, a mummer's farce.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite its lunges for the mainstream, in other words, The Act has forgotten one of the most important things about escapist cinema and cartoons: they generally don't require this much effort.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While Neversoft's course design holds up, its objectives sadly don't; setting high scores is as thrilling and rewarding as ever, but we're less forgiving of being asked to collect five objects dotted around a level without a right-stick camera than we were at the turn of the millennium.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The guns and costumes you'll be buying make Random Heroes a little more appealing, perhaps, but they're poor compensation for a wider lack of imagination.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Power Of Two may have fewer technical issues than its predecessor, but it's a less adventurous, less courageous, and overall less interesting game. It struggles to make you care about its world, and as a result its one big idea – that of the Wasteland reacting to your choices – feels decidedly flaccid.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Like Borderlands, the promise of fresh guns, equipment and powered-up skills offers an incentive to press on. But unlike its parent series, the combat in Legends means it's not worth doing so.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sluggish loading times tend to cause frame-rate hiccups at the outset of a multiplayer game, and such issues are exacerbated in the busier environments with a full complement of players.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Being among the first of the console MOBAs, Guardians Of Middle-Earth could've been a gentle introduction to an intimidating genre, providing a welcoming hand for players new to the MOBA, but a split focus between accessibility and complexity means neither genre greenhorns nor greybeards will end up feeling truly satisfied.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's tactical depth, then, but it's squandered on a game that doesn't understand the importance of balance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Embracing and supporting a community project like this is still a commendable move, and one that Mega Man's passionate fans may see as encouraging. But only his most die-hard followers will be willing to overlook such unwelcome, avoidable flaws.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's enough warmth and wit here to make Middle Manager Of Justice one of the more palatable exercises in building a game around waiting and offering micro-transactions to skip the wait, but sadly all our spider-senses detect is a missed opportunity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A cynical, if predictable approach to monetisation also sours the experience.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A more novel addition is a crafting system lets you convert items you find into items and potions, but it functions more like a secondary currency than an alchemical minigame. There’s nothing egregiously wrong with Mini Ninjas, but nor is there a reason to give up on genre highlights like Punch Quest and Jetpack Joyride.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Due to a heavier emphasis on all-out action, however, the gratifying bullet-cam pay-off becomes tiresome even sooner than it did in V2.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gorgeous and silky smooth it may be, but the level design feels like it was made with in-app Continue purchases specifically in mind, hiding enemies cruelly – and punishingly – behind obstacles, preventing the game from flowing and dazzling as it clearly has the potential to. Accomplished and beautiful, then, but Sonic Dash shows that, for Sega, learning from the competition comes at a price – one it’s passed onto its fans.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    But for parents and adults, Undercover is a less inviting prospect, even with its satirical undertone. It’s a plastic facsimile of GTA – a game that was hardly humourless to begin with, and one that has already spawned a genre’s worth of more sophisticated rivals and clones.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s a satisfying Shadow Complex-meets-Smash-Bros. style romp somewhere in The Showdown Effect, but it’s buried beneath gameplay mechanics that interfere with the joys its premise suggests, and there are currently stability issues with the servers that demand some urgent attention.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The representation of the xenomorphs is the game’s most damaging failure. They’re just not dangerous enough, reduced by a first mission deluge into a swarm of targets bearing the shape of a familiar, once-horrific symbol of death. But they have none of that pop icon’s grace or deadliness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nimble Quest is cute and compelling, but it’s also a cynical complication of a classic design.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A bigger problem still is the absence of a motivation to work with other players. Objectives are usually thinly disguised fetch quests or encounters where you must defend a character, usually Cass, against waves of enemies.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The artwork goes some way to redeeming The Other Brothers; for all the detail to be found in the backgrounds and sprites, everything moves fluidly, but ultimately this is still a platforming game on the wrong platform.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In-app purchases, however, are handled with more nuance and kept pleasingly out of sight.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s easy to admire the developer’s evident love for the NES game – it’s clearly been handled with the kind of care only a genuine fan would provide – but after a few repetitive hours bouncing around DuckTales’ pretty but unremarkable worlds you’ll begin to realise that some treasures aren’t worth the effort of unearthing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unlike iOS title The Room, here intricacy proves a weakness, and Open Me doesn’t have the rich atmosphere of Fireproof Games’ award-winning puzzler to compensate for its mechanical awkwardness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    When directing death from above, Strike Team offers a glimpse at what might have been, but when it’s time to go loud, the whole thing collapses as limply as the enemies you’ve dropped.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Lucid is carrying on the spirit of its PGR days with this sim-arcade hybrid, but where Bizarre Creations’ driving games pushed their platforms’ boundaries, 2K Drive is incapable of breaking through the limitations of iOS.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s no sense of strength or weight to your actions despite how extravagant the carnage becomes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With no meaningful equivalent to the communal goals and tactical layovers that gave Planes a stay of execution, once the paywall stalls your progress like leaves on the line, there’s little reason to continue. Even for those who’ve ‘supported’ NimbleBit with regular IAP donations, you suspect the Bux stop here.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rain’s core ideas remain frustratingly underdeveloped throughout, and it comes off more like a watercolour sketch than the oil painting that was promised.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a far more systemically diverse game than Heavy Rain, and its story is certainly more believably told through Holmes, Dafoe and a fine supporting cast. Yet this is a game almost entirely bereft of tension, one in which failure goes largely unpunished and is almost always inconsequential. There is emotion here, but it’s felt passively, as spectator instead of player.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s a familiar, welcoming charm to Wii Party U, which offers an evening spent in the company of nice-but-quiet friends. We wouldn’t blame you, however, if you snuck out to visit the more vibrant party hosted by Wario or Bumpie next door.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a perfectly serviceable adventure that you’ll play through with few frustrations, but will likely have forgotten by the following morning. Ratchet and Clank’s story ends, then, not with a bang, but with a half-hearted shrug.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s during its harder moments that Crimson Dragon pushes you away. A combination of heavy handling and poor communication make you feel hoodwinked rather than outmatched, and the ability to buy continues with Gems you’ve purchased with real money sullies the challenge. It’s a good job that the Zen gardens of those easier levels are always there to return to.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Board game fans might be able to overlook these sins to find the deep game within, but developers Full Control has done too little to evangelise the cult of Space Hulk.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Strip out the poor parkour and clunky melee and all you’re left with is a shooter, and a workmanlike one at that.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    All but shorn of their narrative context, the missions can feel rather inconsequential, disconnected from the truncated plot and lacking the variety and invention of some of the 3DS game’s later missions.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Octodad: Dadliest Catch asks you to overlook an awful lot more than plot holes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unepic is a perfectly serviceable platform-RPG, but Unremarkable might have been a more apposite title.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    EDF was never about careful aiming or strategic cover or any of the other things that drive modern shooters, though – it’s about superior firepower earned through RPG grind, but 2025 has made the happy grind gruelling.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a B-movie game in every sense, but approach it with sufficiently lowered expectations, and you may just be pleasantly surprised.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sadly, any gains made here are squandered by woolly controls, a dearth of feedback and infuriating inaccuracy even with aiming assist dialed up to maximum.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On a console where tried and tested ideas continue to dominate, it would be wrong to entirely dismiss an experiment like this, even if the result is only fleetingly worthwhile.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a whole, Mercenary Kings is a case study in the perils of Early Access. The need to provide a steady flow of content to early buyers has birthed a glut of superfluous systems and a swollen set of missions – the wrong sort of substance to accompany Robertson’s style.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Free-to-play works when you earn the trust of your players over time, but RedLynx instead prods you at every opportunity to remind you that you haven’t paid for your game yet. Even so, once dredged from beneath the cloying mass of microtransactions that suffocate it, Trials Frontier isn’t a bad game as such. It is, however, a very bad Trials game.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rivals’ biggest problem is that its chances of success are inexorably bound to the performance of the device around which it is designed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a cheap thrill, a shallow way to connect input with outcome that doesn’t, in the end, compensate for Pocket Football Club’s lack of responsiveness elsewhere.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a game that, for all the intricacy of its systems and the charm of its painterly world, feels oddly empty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Players who seek the traditional fantasy MMOG experience may find something of value in TESO, because it has evidently been built with them in mind. But it is difficult to imagine many others investing hundreds of hours in a place this bland, in a formula this familiar, and in a game this demanding of both your time and your money.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A nice core bit of gameplay tarted up with unnecessary pretensions and stretched too thin, even over its short playtime. It feels like a minigame from a bigger title – specifically, those minigames from God of War and Dead Space 2 in which you guide a plummeting hero through falling debris. What it doesn’t feel like is a full a game – let alone the artsy indie hero Sony would like it to be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    But content is no substitute for quality, and while Sniper Elite III might have made for an engaging design document, it isn’t much of a game.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's a fine line between graphic artistry and immaturity, and while Alter Echo makes an attempt at the former, it probably falls into the latter. The hues are creative enough, and the faux-naturelle structures suitably curled and alien but perhaps the real problem is that a world made from plastic would look as dull as it sounds. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine