Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,620 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Grand Theft Auto V
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,620 game reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Once you’ve wiped away the layer of gore, you’re left with an experience that, expectedly, offers limited entertainment. [March 2005, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The guns and costumes you'll be buying make Random Heroes a little more appealing, perhaps, but they're poor compensation for a wider lack of imagination.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Power Of Two may have fewer technical issues than its predecessor, but it's a less adventurous, less courageous, and overall less interesting game. It struggles to make you care about its world, and as a result its one big idea – that of the Wasteland reacting to your choices – feels decidedly flaccid.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's enough warmth and wit here to make Middle Manager Of Justice one of the more palatable exercises in building a game around waiting and offering micro-transactions to skip the wait, but sadly all our spider-senses detect is a missed opportunity.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The fifth Tony Hawk's title doesn't just suffer because of its embarrassing attempts to be edgy and urban, it's poorer because it lacks the verve and imagination so prevalent in previous iterations. [Christmas 2003, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Once you've become fluent in the new pattern of motion the platforming becomes very satisfying, marrying timing and action more intimately than the usual moving platform/timed-jump challenges. However, things become rather unstuck when enemies are introduced. [Feb 2005, p.81]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    IGI2 straddles the same uneasy middle ground between (pseudo) realism and playability as its predecessor, and consequently strays from the realm of the enjoyable to that of the tedious far more often than is desirable. [March 2003, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rarely does dying feel like the player's fault and, in typical "Sonic Adventure" fashion, the best bits are when you find that the majority of control has been taken away from you, and you're flung around the world at escape velocity. [Mar 2004, p.105]
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's a shame to see what could have been. [Dec 2009, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Netherrealm has taken a number of welcome steps forward with Mortal Kombat X, but no momentum is gathered, because it's stopped in its tracks by an avalanche of needless distractions, some miserable netcode and - oddly, for a game so obsessed with death in all its grisly forms - poor execution of decent ideas. [June 2015, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The joy of Pirates of the Caribbean is to be found in the variety of the elements delivered - sword fights and canon battles happily sit alongside contraband trade route management. But ultimately none offer a tremendous amount of depth. [Nov 2003, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Repetitive and simplistic, Alien Breed Evolution may remain true to its inspiration, but this first episode does no more than reinforce Team 17's reputation for serviceable but uninspiring updates of past glories. [Feb 2010, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The representation of the xenomorphs is the game’s most damaging failure. They’re just not dangerous enough, reduced by a first mission deluge into a swarm of targets bearing the shape of a familiar, once-horrific symbol of death. But they have none of that pop icon’s grace or deadliness.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Fundamentally, combat feels feeble and insubstantial - partly out of aesthetic failure to convey power, but mostly out of a design choice to limit the effectivness of your weaponry (see 'Gun Damn'). [Mar 2008, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Constantine’s narrative is compelling enough, and some excellent puzzles save it from the ignominy of being yet another average third-person movie tie-in, but only just... Yes it’s uncomplicated, but still an engaging realisation of the source material. [Apr 2005, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If Headhunter’s controls were as coherent as its looks, it could’ve made for one of the greatest action-adventure games of recent times. Instead, we’re left with a clunky shooting gallery that is, in parts, a likeable gunfighting game. [Oct 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Even when driven in full race trim, every vehicle feels ponderous and with overly soft suspension often resulting in an unnecessarily laborious control method. It's not a bad game, by any means, but the enjoyment provided is limited. [Oct 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This actual action is not rendered with nearly half the imagination or proficiency as the premise offers – and six hours of Remote-induced carpal tunnel syndrome and grim boss-battling overstay their welcome. [Mar 2009, p.91]
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A hastily assembled three-in-one anachronism which proves just one thing: that terrifying and terrible are not mutually exclusive. [Apr 2010, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Without the challenge and cruelty that can make a classic, the results here are likeable, confident, and nowhere near essential. [Mar 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game's visual and combative energy spark the urge to see where it goes next. If only there was something to do when you get there.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Feels like a proof of concept for a much more substantial, and refined, counterpart. [Apr 2015, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Strip out the poor parkour and clunky melee and all you’re left with is a shooter, and a workmanlike one at that.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While moments of genuine beauty exist, they occur in the context of a game that otherwise simply cannot compete with its contemporaries when it comes to visual presentation - a symptom, perhaps, of the seven-year development cycle. [Feb 2015, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Briefly diverting. [Apr 2015, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rather than expanding on what came before, too often it punishes the committed player, their weapons rendered obsolete, their best gear reset, their flair for teamwork hamstrung by aggressive mobs. [Feb 2015, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While it lasts, it’s one of the better platformers available on XBLA, and the inability to die and general ease of progression make it ideal for very young gamers. [Mar 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Structurally, the game is a waking nightmare. The hub world is vast and unnecessarily confusing, and it is possible to become trapped in levels if you can't figure out where to go next. [Mar 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On retreading the levels enemy attacks become predictable puppet shows, with mad-eyed soldiers lining up to get killed exactly where they did many times before. It's the kind of repetition more commonly associated with lightgun games these days. [Christmas 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The core idea of Eat Them is sound, and when it works it's undeniable fun; there's a definite pleasure in starting with a pristine, ordered city and methodically reducing it to rubble. [Feb 2011, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Namco’s design process seems so addled by the multiform calls for improvement – the aforementioned mission design, multiplayer modes (which remain entirely offline), storylines and sheer content volume all trailing expectations – that it’s momentarily lost its focus. [July 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Techland has played fast and loose with a genre that need refining in to truly let pulses soar. The result is a game that's daft, sloppy fun begging for an injection of refinement. [Feb 2011, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Fun concepts brought low by crummy execution. Hand-to-hand combat can benefit from skill-based flourishes, but rarely goes beyond crude whomping. Large plains hide crannies galore, though you navigate them atop a horse with the handling of a bus.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While there are occasional sparks from things like laser weapons, or games of tag in the arena combat, too much time is spent racing the same courses at the same speed, with only a very gradual increase in AI awareness to differentiate each step up through the ranks. [Mar 2007, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Some will still find DOAX 2 to be a soothingly directionless or charmingly goofy, a game that feels numbingly pointless when treated like other games. But if this is you second visit to Zack Island, you may well find yourself wasting fewer hours than expected. [Feb 2007, p.79]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At least building the game around a mountain ascent avoids survival horror cliché. Instead of stepping bravely into the murk you are motivated forwards by the peak's promise. [Oct 2009, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s a familiar, welcoming charm to Wii Party U, which offers an evening spent in the company of nice-but-quiet friends. We wouldn’t blame you, however, if you snuck out to visit the more vibrant party hosted by Wario or Bumpie next door.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is another ugly blunder. Pacific Assault demonstrates that bewildering battle scenes are no equal for clever level design and attention to detail. [Christmas 2004, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a B-movie game in every sense, but approach it with sufficiently lowered expectations, and you may just be pleasantly surprised.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Wet
    Some cool things happen to crazy people in A2M's Wet, but unfortunately there are times in between where you're actually expected to play it. [Nov 2009, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Board game fans might be able to overlook these sins to find the deep game within, but developers Full Control has done too little to evangelise the cult of Space Hulk.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Puzzle Bobble's hardly become a bad game, it just doesn't seem interested in getting any better. [Oct 2009, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The pacing, thanks to a combination of necessary haste and the weakness of your divided squad members, feels more akin to a corridor shooter; there’s a constant sensation of feeling harried and hemmed in. [Oct 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    BW2 is a strategy game that doesn't demand much strategy. That doesn't mean it's not sometimes enjoyable, but it's nothing more than an occasional diversion. [Jan 2008, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The convincing sense of speed is dulled by a lack of weight to the handling, while collisions betray some erratic physics: you can easily be shunted into a respawn by other racers, yet left relatively unscathed by a head-on smash into trees.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There are moments of compelling spectacle...But the stop/start intrusion of missed QTE presses hurts these moments of the game, even as the dramatic visuals start to win over the most skeptical player. [June 2009, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Yes, there’s a good sense of speed, but the dreariness of racing against brainless AI opponents who combine little awareness of their surroundings with a remarkably lethargic and lifeless approach to a supposedly exciting activity soon has that counterbalanced. [May 2005, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Acclaim's latest manages to tick all the required futuristic race sim boxes, except the one titled 'memorable'. There's one really good thing about XGRA - it's all over very quickly. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unepic is a perfectly serviceable platform-RPG, but Unremarkable might have been a more apposite title.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Players who seek the traditional fantasy MMOG experience may find something of value in TESO, because it has evidently been built with them in mind. But it is difficult to imagine many others investing hundreds of hours in a place this bland, in a formula this familiar, and in a game this demanding of both your time and your money.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Subtitling this Battle Revolution could be considered a breach of advertising standards; it's about as revolutionary as a racing game with powerslides. But while Custom Robo lacks a fresh hook, it's done with such a diligent simplicity that it's hard not to take a shine to it. [July 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While suspension of disbelief can stretch to accommodate the odd genuine flaw – inconsistencies between what objects you can and can’t punch through, for example – the sequel has too many to hide. [Feb 2007, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Quietly competent to the very end, Avatar's certainly not the disaster you may have feared, but it can feel patronising, pompous and a little unnecessary. [Jan 2010, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Boom Boom Rocket is marking time rather than feeling the rhythm, and that’s not enough to set Live Arcade’s skies alight. [June 2007, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Apart from its admirable combinatorial system, Impossible Creatures is just another RTS. Indeed it's fairly simplistic as the genre goes...In theory this should foster a quick and immediate title, but in practice the build-up of resources is slow. Plainly average. [March 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While online play provides more convincing competition, with only eight riders supported the circuit will appear as underpopulated as the scenery. [Aug 2008, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game is divided into four tournaments, each containing four unique courses. It's when you get to the second stage of the first tournament that the game's major failing makes itself apparent: there's only one composition to race to. Presumably, the developers thought this would be enough, as differences in course layout and sound effects provide a little variety, but in practice it's just too repetitive.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For anyone who hasn’t played a thirdperson platforming adventure game in the last five years, this might well serve as perfectly engaging and adequate entertainment. To everyone else, it serves as a very clear reference point for just how many evolutions the rest of the genre has undergone since the PS1’s heyday. [Oct 2005, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A strangled idea, and while hard to dismiss it’s difficult to recommend entirely. [Feb 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sluggish loading times tend to cause frame-rate hiccups at the outset of a multiplayer game, and such issues are exacerbated in the busier environments with a full complement of players.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Vanguard simply fails to deliver the pomp and bluster or the window dressing so essential in disguising the shortcomings inherent in "Call of Duty's" framework. [May 2007, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It is so often calamitous that its few charms are either squandered or obscured. [Christmas 2009, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    EDF was never about careful aiming or strategic cover or any of the other things that drive modern shooters, though – it’s about superior firepower earned through RPG grind, but 2025 has made the happy grind gruelling.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gorgeous and silky smooth it may be, but the level design feels like it was made with in-app Continue purchases specifically in mind, hiding enemies cruelly – and punishingly – behind obstacles, preventing the game from flowing and dazzling as it clearly has the potential to. Accomplished and beautiful, then, but Sonic Dash shows that, for Sega, learning from the competition comes at a price – one it’s passed onto its fans.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    An extremely unambitious sequel. [Jan 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    One of the most robust online community setups to grace Nintendo’s handheld, enabling users to link the DS game to a web profile, where they can browse and queue tracks for later download. [Dec 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Fundamentally a little anaemic, lacking the kind of acute design which would either make its stages distinct or its basic operation continually engaging. [Sept 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Black Sigil's big-picture rewards are too fleeting and familiar to justify the considerable effort. [Sept 2009, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The flash and gore are toned down, and the henchmen never get any smarter, but that bond with the protagonist – and that investment in his salvation – make the whole game worthwhile. [Apr 2009, p.117]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A hastily assembled three-in-one anachronism which proves just one thing: that terrifying and terrible are not mutually exclusive. [Apr 2010, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While the arcade version of the game (included here in its entirety) is not without serious flaws, this interpretation exacerbates those that exist and throws in significant new ones. [Jan 2008, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Star Wars: Galaxies does not offer fans of the franchise any heroics. There is nothing dramatic or cinematic about the MMRPG game model as defined by Everquest, and Galaxies does very little to break that mould. [Oct 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite its lunges for the mainstream, in other words, The Act has forgotten one of the most important things about escapist cinema and cartoons: they generally don't require this much effort.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Well engineered and, while unexceptional in almost every fashion, it does boast a superb level of attention to detail. [June 2003, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A cynical, if predictable approach to monetisation also sours the experience.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rather than gradually introduce the many plates you have to spin, it puts them all into action at once, starting with 20 near-identical walkover levels and then spiking brutally when it assumes you've worked everything out. [Dec 2010, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    But content is no substitute for quality, and while Sniper Elite III might have made for an engaging design document, it isn’t much of a game.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s the refusal to broaden the series’ horizons, though, which will serve to damage Sony’s oft-forgotten franchise most in the long run. It leaves Confrontation feeling stale and lost among the recent crowd of tac-shooters. [Christmas 2008, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Heroes consistently relies on its cartoon charm to plaster over its messier elements. [Sept 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Its basic form is a succession of things that you hit with little emotion or interest. Approaching such a task co-operatively can only distract you for so long. [June 2009, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Away from the restrictions enforced by the licence the game improves. Free Roam gives you unlimited access to the excellently designed LA streets and rooftops, while Stunt Mode also takes greater advantage of the exquisite physics engine. But why are there no added incentives such as stunt scoring or accumulators? A missed opportunity. [Oct 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nobody, nobody at all, walks into a game shop and thinks: "Hey, goblins are pretty cool. Today I want to be a goblin." When the goblins in question have been rendered with almost no character or charm, this merely compounds the lack of emotional connection. [Mar 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Many titles are likened to "Devil May Cry," but Van Helsing appropriates that game's structure with such brazen thoroughness that it might be seen as this generation's Great Giana Sisters. [July 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If you take a player to the extremes of in-game power, giving them the equivalent of a god mode against standard enemies, how can that be turned into something more engaging than a temporary plaything? [Nov 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Haze is a distinctly unflattering addition to Playstation 3's library, embarrassingly reminiscent of the previous generation. [July 2008, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's perhaps because the title benefits from such a high production spend … that the average design and execution becomes more pronounced. [Mar 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Tycoon City’s desire to create a believable Big Apple has become an obsession, focusing on that end rather than the means of getting there. Where its peers extol freedom, this game calls the shots. [Mar 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Commander Video needs to be the bigger rectangle and step aside for the two final planned installments. [July 2010, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's easy to over-rate launch titles thanks to the shock of the new, doubly so when the control scheme is as interesting as this one, but at its heart Red Steel is just another lever-pulling trawl through big rooms and S-shaped corridors. [Christmas 2006, p.77]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Were spirits to play a game while they waited in Purgatory, surely it would be Mario Party. It can take an age to get to the end, and the minigames are interspersed with a turgid board game section that tests the patience to its limits. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It all adds up to an uneven brawler, a game with the resources and technology to break through the walls of the developer's lineage but one unprepared to fully let go and take a chance. [Dec 2010, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    3DS was the perfect opportunity to take Super Monkey Ball back to its GameCube glory days. Instead we find a game that has spent so many years honouring various types of hardware, it has forgotten its own original aim. [May 2011, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s sure to be a more compelling experience online, albeit one that relies heavily on the honour of your opponents, and its rough-edged charm is compulsive. [Mar 2007, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Being among the first of the console MOBAs, Guardians Of Middle-Earth could've been a gentle introduction to an intimidating genre, providing a welcoming hand for players new to the MOBA, but a split focus between accessibility and complexity means neither genre greenhorns nor greybeards will end up feeling truly satisfied.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Mario Kart isn't a racing game any more. It is a party game, and anyone buying it for anything more than frantic, foolish, social fun will grow tired of being cheated very quickly indeed. [Christmas 2003, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Like any good zombie fiction, the real enemy in AZMD! isn't the walking dead, but the humans who created them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game's failure to monopolise on its squad dynamic relegates it to a shooter-by-numbers, and its appeal is then further undercut by the fact that, while Barker clearly has a sense for the grotesque, it is the only note that Jericho plays. [Dec 2007, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sadly, any gains made here are squandered by woolly controls, a dearth of feedback and infuriating inaccuracy even with aiming assist dialed up to maximum.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Even the most dedicated player’s are likely to fall out of love with the game more frequently than its promise of unstoppable motion and a world outside slate-grey corridors (which becomes more distant as the game progresses) can entice them back. [May 2005, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If there isn't a great deal of sophistication, there also isn't much in the way of mucking around. Flying up the screen making things go pop has been reliably entertaining for decades. [Oct 2005, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine