Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,579 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,579 game reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    When directing death from above, Strike Team offers a glimpse at what might have been, but when it’s time to go loud, the whole thing collapses as limply as the enemies you’ve dropped.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Lucid is carrying on the spirit of its PGR days with this sim-arcade hybrid, but where Bizarre Creations’ driving games pushed their platforms’ boundaries, 2K Drive is incapable of breaking through the limitations of iOS.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s no sense of strength or weight to your actions despite how extravagant the carnage becomes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With no meaningful equivalent to the communal goals and tactical layovers that gave Planes a stay of execution, once the paywall stalls your progress like leaves on the line, there’s little reason to continue. Even for those who’ve ‘supported’ NimbleBit with regular IAP donations, you suspect the Bux stop here.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rain’s core ideas remain frustratingly underdeveloped throughout, and it comes off more like a watercolour sketch than the oil painting that was promised.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a far more systemically diverse game than Heavy Rain, and its story is certainly more believably told through Holmes, Dafoe and a fine supporting cast. Yet this is a game almost entirely bereft of tension, one in which failure goes largely unpunished and is almost always inconsequential. There is emotion here, but it’s felt passively, as spectator instead of player.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s a familiar, welcoming charm to Wii Party U, which offers an evening spent in the company of nice-but-quiet friends. We wouldn’t blame you, however, if you snuck out to visit the more vibrant party hosted by Wario or Bumpie next door.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a perfectly serviceable adventure that you’ll play through with few frustrations, but will likely have forgotten by the following morning. Ratchet and Clank’s story ends, then, not with a bang, but with a half-hearted shrug.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s during its harder moments that Crimson Dragon pushes you away. A combination of heavy handling and poor communication make you feel hoodwinked rather than outmatched, and the ability to buy continues with Gems you’ve purchased with real money sullies the challenge. It’s a good job that the Zen gardens of those easier levels are always there to return to.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Board game fans might be able to overlook these sins to find the deep game within, but developers Full Control has done too little to evangelise the cult of Space Hulk.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Strip out the poor parkour and clunky melee and all you’re left with is a shooter, and a workmanlike one at that.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    All but shorn of their narrative context, the missions can feel rather inconsequential, disconnected from the truncated plot and lacking the variety and invention of some of the 3DS game’s later missions.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Octodad: Dadliest Catch asks you to overlook an awful lot more than plot holes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unepic is a perfectly serviceable platform-RPG, but Unremarkable might have been a more apposite title.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    EDF was never about careful aiming or strategic cover or any of the other things that drive modern shooters, though – it’s about superior firepower earned through RPG grind, but 2025 has made the happy grind gruelling.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a B-movie game in every sense, but approach it with sufficiently lowered expectations, and you may just be pleasantly surprised.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sadly, any gains made here are squandered by woolly controls, a dearth of feedback and infuriating inaccuracy even with aiming assist dialed up to maximum.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On a console where tried and tested ideas continue to dominate, it would be wrong to entirely dismiss an experiment like this, even if the result is only fleetingly worthwhile.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a whole, Mercenary Kings is a case study in the perils of Early Access. The need to provide a steady flow of content to early buyers has birthed a glut of superfluous systems and a swollen set of missions – the wrong sort of substance to accompany Robertson’s style.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Free-to-play works when you earn the trust of your players over time, but RedLynx instead prods you at every opportunity to remind you that you haven’t paid for your game yet. Even so, once dredged from beneath the cloying mass of microtransactions that suffocate it, Trials Frontier isn’t a bad game as such. It is, however, a very bad Trials game.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rivals’ biggest problem is that its chances of success are inexorably bound to the performance of the device around which it is designed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a cheap thrill, a shallow way to connect input with outcome that doesn’t, in the end, compensate for Pocket Football Club’s lack of responsiveness elsewhere.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a game that, for all the intricacy of its systems and the charm of its painterly world, feels oddly empty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Players who seek the traditional fantasy MMOG experience may find something of value in TESO, because it has evidently been built with them in mind. But it is difficult to imagine many others investing hundreds of hours in a place this bland, in a formula this familiar, and in a game this demanding of both your time and your money.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A nice core bit of gameplay tarted up with unnecessary pretensions and stretched too thin, even over its short playtime. It feels like a minigame from a bigger title – specifically, those minigames from God of War and Dead Space 2 in which you guide a plummeting hero through falling debris. What it doesn’t feel like is a full a game – let alone the artsy indie hero Sony would like it to be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    But content is no substitute for quality, and while Sniper Elite III might have made for an engaging design document, it isn’t much of a game.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At release, it offers a staggeringly beautiful world filled with unfinished systems, ugly cash grabs, and a string of missed opportunities. [Jan 2014, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's a fine line between graphic artistry and immaturity, and while Alter Echo makes an attempt at the former, it probably falls into the latter. The hues are creative enough, and the faux-naturelle structures suitably curled and alien but perhaps the real problem is that a world made from plastic would look as dull as it sounds. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With no real sense of connection with your monsters, or of engagement with the clumsily delivered plot, there is little here to help the game overcome its tendency towards charmless, chore-based repetition. [Jan 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You get the impression the only person who cares about Kain's legacy any more is the writer. The turgid battling lets an average game down. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nasty, brutish and short - and that's once you've got past the interface problems. Temple of Elemental Evil is a huge disappointment by any measure. [Christmas 2003, p.124]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Instant deaths, glitchy combat, uninspiring boss encounters and twitchy controls conspire to make this a below-par experience. If it wasn't for the occasional flashes of imagination and the familiarity and richness conveyed through the license then The Emperor's Tomb would be utterly forgettable. [May 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Somebody up there probably regards this as a trailblazing taste of high-concept, one-size-fits-all blockbuster games to come. Consider that, and know true Primal fear. [March 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Instant deaths, glitchy combat, uninspiring boss encounters and twitchy controls conspire to make this a below-par experience. If it wasn't for the occasional flashes of imagination and the familiarity and richness conveyed through the license then The Emperor's Tomb would be utterly forgettable. [May 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In action the game is undeniably pretty, as long as you can stomach the monstrous camera. But beyond ther anime-inspired visuals, the action turgidly limps along without ever really engaging or entertaining. [May 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a title trying hard to inject personality into the genre, the experience feels irreparably mechanical. There's plenty of variety in terms of racing categories and machinery, but the overall lack of involvement is inexcusable. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's no style in LowRider's low-riding - it's all about robotic timing, brute force and repetition over elegance. [March 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You get the impression the only person who cares about Kain's legacy any more is the writer. The turgid battling lets an average game down. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's a shame, but LifeLine is just poorly implemented. With the laborious pacing complicated by the dodgy voice-recognition, flaws in the gimmicky technology negate what satisfying moments are on offer here. [May 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A soulless videogame that stands as a grave indictment of how stale a series can become if it loses its spark of creativity and imagination. [March 2005, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Voyeurs will be disappointed, since the sex portrayed is the very model of conventionality. The really shocking thing is how close Singles gets to being wholesome. [June 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Firefights become more surreal than menacing when the worst-case scenario is of your fellow GIs having to catch their breath for a few seconds after being riddled with bullets. [Aug 2004, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Firefights become more surreal than menacing when the worst-case scenario is of your fellow GIs having to catch their breath for a few seconds after being riddled with bullets. [Aug 2004, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Playing Gungrave OD, there's a nagging sensation that the design team experienced the original through a shop window...In attempting to meet criticisms of Gungrave's single-minded focus, that focus has been squandered. The result is unlikely to satisfy. [May 2004, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Ends up feeling like it’s been built by PC game developers obsessed with quick saves. There’s absolutely no creative latitude; it’s a case of remembering where enemies appear and getting them before they get you. [May 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With the exceptions of deplorably bad cutscenes and haphazard signposting, there are few significant flaws here that a steadier gestation couldn’t have resolved. [Aug 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With the exceptions of deplorably bad cutscenes and haphazard signposting, there are few significant flaws here that a steadier gestation couldn’t have resolved. [Aug 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The possibility of this all coming together in a more flexible and engaging manner is still a welcome one. But, for a game based on a culture of reputation, craftsmanship and leaving a mark, Getting Up is one that’ll pass by largely unnoticed. [Mar 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For all its wit and swagger, Truckers is inescapably safety-conscious, rewarding the maintenance of a planned route and steady trajectory while more arresting notions - spontaneous risk, for example - fall from the back like poorly fastened cases of moonshine. [Sept 2005, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Frustratingly, the game’s on-rails sequences exacerbate its lack of invention, whipping up enemies that often inflict damage before their location is revealed. When a single rocket can end the game by killing you or your entourage, this tests the patience more than a prosaic shooter has the right to. [Aug 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Even with just an additional pair of buttons for camera movement, a broad switch of irritations could have been avoided, but as it is, Death Jr is recommended only for forgiving platformer enthusiasts. [Nov 2005, p.113]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For such a costly flagship title to provide neither the promised statement of mainstream grown-up appeal nor even polished, lesser disposable thrills is a landmark failure. [May 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For such a costly flagship title to provide neither the promised statement of mainstream grown-up appeal nor even polished, lesser disposable thrills is a landmark failure. [May 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Yes, Beat Down revives the warped charisma of Capcom’s beat’em up heyday, but that’s the only area where it actually triumphs. [Oct 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a game that makes you desperately want to feel like a Jedi, arcing your lightsaber across the screen, ducking under attacks, parrying counters and going in for the kill, but the subtlety just isn’t there. [July 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Bad Day LA is the game people often say they want and then ignore when it arrives; it prizes ambition over execution and flair over finesse and both pays the price and reaps the rewards for daring to do so. [Sept 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Seemingly conflicted between delivering next-gen graphical impact and providing immediately recognisable objectives, Killer Game errs on the side of form over function, and in turn stumbles though a laundry list of poor design decisions. [Dec 2005, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For all its wit and swagger, Truckers is inescapably safety-conscious, rewarding the maintenance of a planned route and steady trajectory while more arresting notions - spontaneous risk, for example - fall from the back like poorly fastened cases of moonshine. [Sept 2005, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    By keeping it real, the game retains many of the things that make navigating the real city more of a pain than a pleasure: countless faceless skyscrapers don’t make for memorable landmarks, and facing the wrong way down a jammed one-way street when you’re in a hurry to get somewhere is the sort of challenge few will relish. [Jan 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The story is inventively fantastical but ridiculously so, like a child’s weightless daydreaming, and its shallowness is made all the clearer by Agetec’s lifeless and laborious translation. [Feb 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s just not accurate or tangible enough to be rewarding, handling with the same kind of wool as Sonic’s 3D platformers. [Apr 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Approached free of any expectations higher than endless, mindless single-button mashing, the kenpu collecting and scenery spotting can provide some limited enjoyment in smaller doses, but approached as an epic quest, Key Of Heaven is one better left untaken. [Mar 2006, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that’s both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The possibility of this all coming together in a more flexible and engaging manner is still a welcome one. But, for a game based on a culture of reputation, craftsmanship and leaving a mark, Getting Up is one that’ll pass by largely unnoticed. [Mar 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Astonishia ultimately proves to be little more than a charming catalogue of decade-old foibles and cliché. [Aug 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a high-profile demonstration of the fact that those who created this much-loved universe have lost their understanding of what originally made it so engaging. [Apr 2006, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For most players there's just not enough here to hold any prolonged interest. [Mar 2008, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Each of the areas you’ll traverse in Scurge feel like they’ve simply had a box of random enemies shaken into it, all making a sudden focused beeline toward you the minute you set foot in the room. [Nov 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's in need of plenty more flair, not so much that it strains against what its buttoned-down framework is trying to achieve, but just to inject some feeling of variety into its skirmishes and sorties. [Sept 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There’s a nugget of brilliance at the heart of Micro Machines that’s too simple and solid to crush, it’s true, but the laughable track editor, fussy interface and baffling load times certainly don’t justify this release. [Aug 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There’s a nugget of brilliance at the heart of Micro Machines that’s too simple and solid to crush, it’s true, but the laughable track editor, fussy interface and baffling load times certainly don’t justify this release. [Aug 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that’s both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s just too hard, the physics too capricious, and the tasks too frustrating for words. [Aug 2006, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s just too hard, the physics too capricious, and the tasks too frustrating for words. [Aug 2006, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    If zSlide wants to directly compete with WarioWare’s creativity, not toying with the PSP’s optional camera or microphone has been a missed opportunity. [July 2007, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    While the basic mechanic shows promise, the game itself is purely mechanical, and predictably joyless as a result. [July 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Army Of Two is relatively straightforward thirdperson shooter, focused on large-scale skirmishes and the dynamics of a two-man team. It’s serviceable enough in some regards. [Apr 2008, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The virtual interface does little to help players and, if anything, slows the game down as you wait for it to catch up with things that are already evident to players – such as victory, failure and boredom. [Dec 2007, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    On balance, its lack of ambition is supported only by a very basic underlying solidity in its execution: too weak to tackle bigger monsters, but strong enough to soldier on with some perseverance. [Nov 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As far as either an authentic simulation or a fun re-imagining goes, it’s like some strange negative of the emperor’s new clothes; the pretty wrapping is there but the body is not. [Mar 2007, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Where B-Boy crucially disappoints is in the execution of its gameplay. The turn-based nature of its stages is interminably frustrating. [Oct 2006, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a series that puts so much stock in its grace and composure, the lack of an intuitive control scheme is hard to overcome. [June 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Blacksite is a thoroughly unexceptional title for which unrealistic promises were made, and one that is further let down by a wide assortment of bugs and design issues. [Jan 2008, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Criticism has often been aimed at Hudson’s perpetual shrug of the shoulders as to how to milk new games from the same old buttons and analogue stick setup, yet here we find all-new motion controls and still no freshness. [Aug 2007, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There’s a desperate lack of innovation on display here; nondescript levels based around ice caves, pyramids and inevitable Mayan temples. The boring locations exacerbate the sneaking feeling that the levels, which can easily take an hour or longer to finish, are simply too large. [JPN Import; Mar 2007, p.81]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The pretty basic minigames are bland, and the worst, such as Pot Luck, are based on blind, dumb chance. So are the best, sadly. They’re fun with four people, but what isn’t? [June 2007, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Two Worlds has a lot of content for anyone willing to slog through it, but its buggy failure to take Oblivion’s crown, its troubled development and unfinished feel are testament to ideas beyond its makers’ capabilities. [Nov 2007, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Ditching the self-aware snuff-movie set-up for an unsubtle conspiracy story, Manhunt 2 lacks the redemption of a smart commentary on violence as entertainment. [Christmas 2008, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Perhaps EA would have done better to port a previous Wing Commander game in its totality rather than staple the name to a somewhat anaemic effort of an awkwardly inauthentic shape. [Oct 2007, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    That it feels so leaden despite its busyness, and fails to ignite despite all its gunpowder, is impossible to ignore. [May 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Blacksite is a thoroughly unexceptional title for which unrealistic promises were made, and one that is further let down by a wide assortment of bugs and design issues. [Jan 2008, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Blacksite is a thoroughly unexceptional title for which unrealistic promises were made, and one that is further let down by a wide assortment of bugs and design issues. [Jan 2008, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Given that its bland combat is little enhanced by the ability to create cover, you suspect that the promises made for the technology have simply dug its own grave. [Dec 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Given that its bland combat is little enhanced by the ability to create cover, you suspect that the promises made for the technology have simply dug its own grave. [Dec 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The last thing on Glory Days’ mind is fun: it instead angrily stomps forward to the beat of the ‘war is hell’ drum. [Oct 2007, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nucleus stands as a poorly executed game in a field where there are so many excellent others that it’s impossible to recommend. [Aug 2007, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Among its many failings one stands out as cardinal and, despite the slick presentation, simply can’t be forgiven: you never really feel in control of what’s going on. [Aug 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A wholly unoriginal creation burdened by memories attached to the good ideas it’s imitating, and made worse by the sloppy execution of basic mechanics. [Oct 2008, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine