Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,808 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Last of Us
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2808 game reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Lucid is carrying on the spirit of its PGR days with this sim-arcade hybrid, but where Bizarre Creations’ driving games pushed their platforms’ boundaries, 2K Drive is incapable of breaking through the limitations of iOS.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At release, it offers a staggeringly beautiful world filled with unfinished systems, ugly cash grabs, and a string of missed opportunities. [Jan 2014, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A whole lot better on phones than it is on 3DS. [July 2015, p.115]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Many titles are likened to "Devil May Cry," but Van Helsing appropriates that game's structure with such brazen thoroughness that it might be seen as this generation's Great Giana Sisters. [July 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Astro Boy is a light cartoon romp sure to please young admirers of the character, but it fails to offer the depth required to engage a broader demographic. [May 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nearly all enemy behaviour consists of direct charges, calling on the butt of your gun as frequently as its barrel. While it’s undeniably intense, it soon becomes apparent that this intensity is the only string on the designers’ banjo, plucked with increasingly feverish rapidity instead of ever-changing chords. [Nov 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rarely does dying feel like the player's fault and, in typical "Sonic Adventure" fashion, the best bits are when you find that the majority of control has been taken away from you, and you're flung around the world at escape velocity. [Mar 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Did a purse-holder at Activision one day grapple fruitlessly with the last game's control system and scrawl in their subsequent notes “Make the next one so that I can play it”? Speculation aside, someone sure messed-up Spider-Man. [Dec 2005, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nearly all enemy behaviour consists of direct charges, calling on the butt of your gun as frequently as its barrel. While it's undeniably intense, it soon becomes apparent that this intensity is the only string on the designers' banjo, plucked with increasingly feverish rapidity instead of ever-changing chords. [Nov 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Free-to-play works when you earn the trust of your players over time, but RedLynx instead prods you at every opportunity to remind you that you haven’t paid for your game yet. Even so, once dredged from beneath the cloying mass of microtransactions that suffocate it, Trials Frontier isn’t a bad game as such. It is, however, a very bad Trials game.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's often unclear whether or not your shots are hitting, which inclines you to blunder out from your cover and head for close quarters - which in turn destroys the developer's intention of forcing a tactical, cautious approach. [Nov 2003, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Yes, you really do feel in chargeof steering, but when the amount of speed put into a tight bend is dictated by the game, not the player, that feeling only delivers so much. [Christmas 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In-app purchases, however, are handled with more nuance and kept pleasingly out of sight.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    So despite the winner podiums and big sponsorship contracts and – yes – even the hours you'll spend in this askew universe, Grand Prix Story feels more like deja vu than entertainment. The formula is rapidly palling.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The dozens of pre-prepared puzzles can be fiendish enough in themselves, but the option of dragging modifier icons on to tiles, changing the pattern with which they flip, enables high scores just as surely as it does enormous headaches. [June 2007, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A hastily assembled three-in-one anachronism which proves just one thing: that terrifying and terrible are not mutually exclusive. [Apr 2010, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As interesting as exploring the island can be, it's painfully hard to get anywhere without being forced to repeat chores that are just plain boring. [May 2007, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A few hairy moments in, and any attempt to get back under your skin is redundant. Mostly this is because the game's resident evil is largely incapable of harming you, and any sense of jeopardy is lost. [Apr 2010, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s not necessarily badly constructed, but in many ways it is badly intentioned, failing not just because of its conga-line of racial and sexual clichés, but because of the way it makes it a little bit easier to criticise videogaming as a hollow and sadistic pursuit. [Dec 2008, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As with Sony’s other long-awaited exclusives, Lair and Heavenly Sword, Folklore pulls its punches, and the romance of its vision ultimately all but vanishes in a puff of fairy dust. [Dec 2007, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's a prevalent fashion at the moment for games to contain a multitude of games styles, a presumption that suggests consumers have become bored of single genre games. But Rogue Squadron III exposes the lie. It's a game that tries too hard to do many things, but only manages to do a few of them well. [Dec 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the game's uncluttered arenas, the camera regularly manages to find a way to flip out and point you in the wrong direction. [Dec 2009, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Encounters feel needlessly protracted - born of a stubborn refusal to admit the game's fundamental lack of content. The layout of scenery predetermines your every gambit before enemies blithely meander into your squad's unlimited gunfire. [Apr 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gun
    Why roam freely (when the game lets you, which is by no means always) when all that's out there to find is an empty trek between jarring episodes of production-line gaming? [Christmas 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s no sophistication, subtlety or real inspiration in the design. It might have Craig’s likeness, but this Bond is more like Connery’s, a thug in a dinner jacket. [Christmas 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Tiberian Twilight finds the series at a crossroads, with its glory days gone and its future uncertain. [May 2010, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As chaotic and unrefined as it is, however, it motors on with a definite sense of purpose and provides a solid sense of fulfilment, if not necessarily one of accomplishment. [Christmas 2005, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At a time when science fiction has never been handled with more vim and vigour, Star Ocean threatens to miss out on all the fun of the genre resurgence through its total lack of ambition. [June 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a sideline between sessions with meatier games it's generally right on target. [Sept 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If Headhunter's controls were as coherent as its looks, it could've made for one of the greatest action-adventure games of recent times. Instead, we're left with a clunky shooting gallery that is, in parts, a likeable gunfighting game. [Oct 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While not doing anything particularly innovative Gun Survivor 4 is frenetic, fun and supremely challenging on its 'extreme difficulty' setting. [May 2003, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The more it seeks to challenge the player, the more likely it becomes for the game to fail to provide either an enjoyable process of trial and error or a legitimate test of aptitude. [Aug 2005, p.97]
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the simplicity of the puzzles, it's an unnecessarily bewildering game for the first hour or so. There's an RPG's worth of menus, full of abilities and stats you just don't need to know about yet. [Mar 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Acclaim's latest manages to tick all the required futuristic race sim boxes, except the one titled 'memorable'. There's one really good thing about XGRA - it's all over very quickly. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    AWESOME Land's harder across the board, actually, but its slightly naff virtual controls work better than expected, and the checkpoint placement isn't unduly sadistic. It's difficult, at times, to tell whether FreakZone's pitched this as parody or homage, but take it as the latter, and you'll have a fairly good couple of hours with it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's a single moment of joy in Fallout Shelter. It comes right at the beginning. [Sept 2015, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Too many of its dishes are mere remixes of the same simple techniques. Too many of its taut time trials founder because of some quirk of the Remote. [June 2007, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    To be fair to The Shoot, it gets the basics right. It just attempts very little beyond them. [Christmas 2010, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The sad fact is that this combat mostly fails to ignite interest, and combined with its cruel difficulty spikes, occasional glitches and a severe differential in graphical quality between 360 and PS3 versions (the latter losing out), Turok's strong contextualisation and smattering of brave ideas get buried. [Mar 2008, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    One of the most ungainly platformers of recent years. [Sept 2015, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rogue Agent is the result of design by committee: a safe, reasonably accomplished but uninspiring offering which neither excels nor progresses its genre in any way. [Christmas 2004, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's becoming a 5th Cell tradition: strong ideas compromised by erratic level design and structural weaknesses. One day, the developer will find the right balance to support its undeniable creativity, but sadly, it hasn't found it here.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Aptly enough, there are two opposite ways to view Mirror’s Edge, ours obviously being the less forgiving one. Its ostensible break from the norm, its sparkling monoliths and its Nordic skies perform some kind of counterbalance, but there is simply not enough depth or reward to the realisation of parkour that lies beyond that sheen. [Christmas 2008, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    You won't even break a sweat before you get to the Silver Cup in the Expert class, and F-Zero stalwarts will feel patronised by the ease with which this short-lived Tournament mode can be completed. [Feb 2004, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The short-term gratification is gradually diminished by too-obvious regeneration of the damage you cause, and there's not enough variety of experience to sustain a monthly subscription. [June 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A fairly standard game in a genre overflowing with quality. [Christmas 2007, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ironically, this series is unlikely to blossom until its popularity wanes and Koei stops being afraid to change it. [July 2005, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    That it largely fails to deliver does not quite snuff out its allure – not, at least, for devotees of the fiction. For those yet to be tempted by Martin's work, however, the blunderous combat, mangled dialoguing and profoundly unlovely looks will make it seem, as a Westerosi idiom goes, a mummer's farce.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If you're looking for a sparklingly attractive shooter with a side order of slinky physics, this delivers the goods. But it's about as average as FPS gaming gets. [June 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a cheap thrill, a shallow way to connect input with outcome that doesn’t, in the end, compensate for Pocket Football Club’s lack of responsiveness elsewhere.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A frustrating port of an above-average game. Rather than attempting to significantly tweak Mafia's structure and narrative … the developer has attempted to replicate the PC experience to the letter. It has been only partially successful. [Mar 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    White Knight Chronicles is competent and solid without ever being beautiful or, you'll find yourself realising with a scratch of the head 15 hours in, particularly enjoyable. [Apr 2010, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Once you’ve wiped away the layer of gore, you’re left with an experience that, expectedly, offers limited entertainment. [March 2005, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Disarray is perhaps the best way to sum up Battleborn. [July 2016, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As chaotic and unrefined as it is, however, it motors on with a definite sense of purpose and provides a solid sense of fulfilment, if not necessarily one of accomplishment. [Christmas 2005, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The early promise is blunted, however, when too many cooks arrive and you're left relying on potshots and memory games. [Christmas 2009, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Did a purse-holder at Activision one day grapple fruitlessly with the last game's control system and scrawl in their subsequent notes “Make the next one so that I can play it”? Speculation aside, someone sure messed-up Spider-Man. [Dec 2005, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rivals’ biggest problem is that its chances of success are inexorably bound to the performance of the device around which it is designed.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Call Of Juarez has mined its source material well, collecting a wealth of imagery that it then squanders on lacklustre and dysfunctional gameplay. [Aug 2007, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Destroy All Humans 2 is initially enjoyable, entirely endurable and gratifyingly easy. But at its heart it remains an average experience. [Dec 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For JRPG unbelievers the battle system changes don’t address the common complaints leveled at the genre. For fans, the emphasis and pacing of its unique selling point overwhelms everything else, stripping the game of its poetry and balance. [Jan 2009, p.5]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As often as it threatens to break the shackles of convention, it's just as content to fall in line with JRPG custom. [Issue#296, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Even the most dedicated player's are likely to fall out of love with the game more frequently than its promise of unstoppable motion and a world outside slate-grey corridors (which becomes more distant as the game progresses) can entice them back. [May 2005, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Due to a heavier emphasis on all-out action, however, the gratifying bullet-cam pay-off becomes tiresome even sooner than it did in V2.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    An apparently new and improved game engine is anything but, with regular framerate drops on PS4, bizarrely stilted animations, and sound effects cutting out entirely during action sequences further deadening the impact of already sloppily edited fight scenes. [Nov 2016, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rogue Agent is the result of design by committee: a safe, reasonably accomplished but uninspiring offering which neither excels nor progresses its genre in any way. [Christmas 2004, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Its faults are many, but they're magnified by the obvious comparison: this isn't an alternative to COD, but a game in thrall to it. [Apr 2011, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a big game, clocking in at about the 40-hour mark, but the lack of challenge in combat combined with the formulaic missions and frequent cutscenes too often make it feel like a sticky trudge.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Where it goes wrong is the finale. Almost every major choice is proven irrelevant, and barely any plot threads resolve. [Jan 2016, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Once you’ve wiped away the layer of gore, you’re left with an experience that, expectedly, offers limited entertainment. [March 2005, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The guns and costumes you'll be buying make Random Heroes a little more appealing, perhaps, but they're poor compensation for a wider lack of imagination.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Power Of Two may have fewer technical issues than its predecessor, but it's a less adventurous, less courageous, and overall less interesting game. It struggles to make you care about its world, and as a result its one big idea – that of the Wasteland reacting to your choices – feels decidedly flaccid.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's enough warmth and wit here to make Middle Manager Of Justice one of the more palatable exercises in building a game around waiting and offering micro-transactions to skip the wait, but sadly all our spider-senses detect is a missed opportunity.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The fifth Tony Hawk's title doesn't just suffer because of its embarrassing attempts to be edgy and urban, it's poorer because it lacks the verve and imagination so prevalent in previous iterations. [Christmas 2003, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Once you've become fluent in the new pattern of motion the platforming becomes very satisfying, marrying timing and action more intimately than the usual moving platform/timed-jump challenges. However, things become rather unstuck when enemies are introduced. [Feb 2005, p.81]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    IGI2 straddles the same uneasy middle ground between (pseudo) realism and playability as its predecessor, and consequently strays from the realm of the enjoyable to that of the tedious far more often than is desirable. [March 2003, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rarely does dying feel like the player's fault and, in typical "Sonic Adventure" fashion, the best bits are when you find that the majority of control has been taken away from you, and you're flung around the world at escape velocity. [Mar 2004, p.105]
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's a shame to see what could have been. [Dec 2009, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Netherrealm has taken a number of welcome steps forward with Mortal Kombat X, but no momentum is gathered, because it's stopped in its tracks by an avalanche of needless distractions, some miserable netcode and - oddly, for a game so obsessed with death in all its grisly forms - poor execution of decent ideas. [June 2015, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The joy of Pirates of the Caribbean is to be found in the variety of the elements delivered - sword fights and canon battles happily sit alongside contraband trade route management. But ultimately none offer a tremendous amount of depth. [Nov 2003, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Repetitive and simplistic, Alien Breed Evolution may remain true to its inspiration, but this first episode does no more than reinforce Team 17's reputation for serviceable but uninspiring updates of past glories. [Feb 2010, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The representation of the xenomorphs is the game’s most damaging failure. They’re just not dangerous enough, reduced by a first mission deluge into a swarm of targets bearing the shape of a familiar, once-horrific symbol of death. But they have none of that pop icon’s grace or deadliness.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Fundamentally, combat feels feeble and insubstantial - partly out of aesthetic failure to convey power, but mostly out of a design choice to limit the effectivness of your weaponry (see 'Gun Damn'). [Mar 2008, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Constantine’s narrative is compelling enough, and some excellent puzzles save it from the ignominy of being yet another average third-person movie tie-in, but only just... Yes it’s uncomplicated, but still an engaging realisation of the source material. [Apr 2005, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If Headhunter’s controls were as coherent as its looks, it could’ve made for one of the greatest action-adventure games of recent times. Instead, we’re left with a clunky shooting gallery that is, in parts, a likeable gunfighting game. [Oct 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Even when driven in full race trim, every vehicle feels ponderous and with overly soft suspension often resulting in an unnecessarily laborious control method. It's not a bad game, by any means, but the enjoyment provided is limited. [Oct 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This actual action is not rendered with nearly half the imagination or proficiency as the premise offers – and six hours of Remote-induced carpal tunnel syndrome and grim boss-battling overstay their welcome. [Mar 2009, p.91]
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A hastily assembled three-in-one anachronism which proves just one thing: that terrifying and terrible are not mutually exclusive. [Apr 2010, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Without the challenge and cruelty that can make a classic, the results here are likeable, confident, and nowhere near essential. [Mar 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game's visual and combative energy spark the urge to see where it goes next. If only there was something to do when you get there.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Assembly is yet another example of mundane game design attempting to hid behind the novelty of VR. The mileage in this strategy is running out. [Oct 2016, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Feels like a proof of concept for a much more substantial, and refined, counterpart. [Apr 2015, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Strip out the poor parkour and clunky melee and all you’re left with is a shooter, and a workmanlike one at that.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While moments of genuine beauty exist, they occur in the context of a game that otherwise simply cannot compete with its contemporaries when it comes to visual presentation - a symptom, perhaps, of the seven-year development cycle. [Feb 2015, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Briefly diverting. [Apr 2015, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rather than expanding on what came before, too often it punishes the committed player, their weapons rendered obsolete, their best gear reset, their flair for teamwork hamstrung by aggressive mobs. [Feb 2015, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While it lasts, it’s one of the better platformers available on XBLA, and the inability to die and general ease of progression make it ideal for very young gamers. [Mar 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Structurally, the game is a waking nightmare. The hub world is vast and unnecessarily confusing, and it is possible to become trapped in levels if you can't figure out where to go next. [Mar 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On retreading the levels enemy attacks become predictable puppet shows, with mad-eyed soldiers lining up to get killed exactly where they did many times before. It's the kind of repetition more commonly associated with lightgun games these days. [Christmas 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The core idea of Eat Them is sound, and when it works it's undeniable fun; there's a definite pleasure in starting with a pristine, ordered city and methodically reducing it to rubble. [Feb 2011, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine