Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,603 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Last of Us
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,603 game reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While Heritage Of Kings has taken the series in a new direction without completely uprooting itself from the settlement-crafting past, it’s not been a successful evolution. Even the most lethargic and undemanding of gamers will quickly become bored of the gambolling wildlife and labouring peasants. [March 2005, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Tales’ traditionally creative dungeon design comes to the rescue, giving each chapter a genuine sense of adventure as you anticipate what organic shimmers or high-tech gloss might be in store. [Apr 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The fifth Tony Hawk's title doesn't just suffer because of its embarrassing attempts to be edgy and urban, it's poorer because it lacks the verve and imagination so prevalent in previous iterations. [Christmas 2003, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The joy of Pirates of the Caribbean is to be found in the variety of the elements delivered - sword fights and canon battles happily sit alongside contraband trade route management. But ultimately none offer a tremendous amount of depth. [Nov 2003, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's tactical depth, then, but it's squandered on a game that doesn't understand the importance of balance.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Away from the restrictions enforced by the licence the game improves. Free Roam gives you unlimited access to the excellently designed LA streets and rooftops, while Stunt Mode also takes greater advantage of the exquisite physics engine. But why are there no added incentives such as stunt scoring or accumulators? A missed opportunity. [Oct 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's not lazy and unworkable, then, merely pleasant, compromised, and irrelevant. [Mar 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Acclaim's latest manages to tick all the required futuristic race sim boxes, except the one titled 'memorable'. There's one really good thing about XGRA - it's all over very quickly. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rarely does dying feel like the player's fault and, in typical "Sonic Adventure" fashion, the best bits are when you find that the majority of control has been taken away from you, and you're flung around the world at escape velocity. [Mar 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For all its foibles, Raven's brand of brazen, aimless carnage is a gruesome thrill with just enough dynamism in each battle to keep its anachronistic heart beating. [Oct 2009, p.88]
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On a console where tried and tested ideas continue to dominate, it would be wrong to entirely dismiss an experiment like this, even if the result is only fleetingly worthwhile.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Your main objective is the bane of the modern FPS: follow a little blue arrow while shooting things, with the odd escort or protect responsibility thrown in to make you turn around occasionally. It's average justice dished out to the licence, but nothing more. [Christmas 2003, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's a certain amount of wit and flair evident throughout Hoodlum Havoc's cut-scenes, and there are certainly some very slick production values. The problem is that, in terms of raw enjoyment, the game is somehow underwhelming. [May 2003, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Crytek's landed on the App Store, then, but it's only half of the company: the wrong half.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nobody, nobody at all, walks into a game shop and thinks: "Hey, goblins are pretty cool. Today I want to be a goblin." When the goblins in question have been rendered with almost no character or charm, this merely compounds the lack of emotional connection. [Mar 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On retreading the levels enemy attacks become predictable puppet shows, with mad-eyed soldiers lining up to get killed exactly where they did many times before. It's the kind of repetition more commonly associated with lightgun games these days. [Christmas 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    After the interesting and confident debut of The Suffering last year, Ties That Bind remains a straightforward action game, and one with a coherent story that feels well paced, if too full of schlocky cliché for some. But that is, ultimately, all it does: remains. [Dec 2005, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In miring the action in a crayon-written plot and applying the brakes to anything going too fast, the screaming thrills it does provide are the exception, not the norm. [Oct 2010, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gesture recognition is loose and forgiving, and it makes no attempt to suggest Kinect's genuinely interpreting every movement. Instead, each manoeuvre feels like the empty-handed equivalent of pushing a button – albeit a button that tends to idle a little before it triggers anything.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    TV Show King’s key problem is that each round is identical: answering five questions for points. [Aug 2008, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A bigger problem still is the absence of a motivation to work with other players. Objectives are usually thinly disguised fetch quests or encounters where you must defend a character, usually Cass, against waves of enemies.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ghosthunter is from the same studio that brought us "Primal," and it shows. With so many adventure games on the market, this is an interesting, but ultimately staid example. Like "Primal," Ghosthunter struggles to be fun. [Jan 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The flash and gore are toned down, and the henchmen never get any smarter, but that bond with the protagonist – and that investment in his salvation – make the whole game worthwhile. [Apr 2009, p.117]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s a satisfying Shadow Complex-meets-Smash-Bros. style romp somewhere in The Showdown Effect, but it’s buried beneath gameplay mechanics that interfere with the joys its premise suggests, and there are currently stability issues with the servers that demand some urgent attention.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Your main objective is the bane of the modern FPS: follow a little blue arrow while shooting things, with the odd escort or protect responsibility thrown in to make you turn around occasionally. It's average justice dished out to the licence, but nothing more. [Christmas 2003, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gun
    Why roam freely (when the game lets you, which is by no means always) when all that's out there to find is an empty trek between jarring episodes of production-line gaming? [Christmas 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ultimately, the momentum needed to truly get Generation Of Chaos in motion is an enormous commitment, and it's a game that just - only just, by the skin of those teeth that need to be pulled - manages to offer enough of a reward to make the investment worthwhile. [June 2006, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rain’s core ideas remain frustratingly underdeveloped throughout, and it comes off more like a watercolour sketch than the oil painting that was promised.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A curiosity worth looking at. [Sept 2009, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the aforementioned illusion of choice, there is really only one pre-determined way to conquer a given mission, each stealthy ability in reality a functional button-press to move the game along. [Apr 2007, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game’s sluggishness is all-pervasive, from Williams’ lethargic climb to the pauses between moving from third- to firstperson when you duck underwater... Death By Degrees progresses at such a sedate pace it’s almost relaxing. [March 2005, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Where there was charm and artistry in the old designs, choosing to detail those basic representations rather than reimagining them makes the look of the new game too generic by far. [Feb 2008, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Your main objective is the bane of the modern FPS: follow a little blue arrow while shooting things, with the odd escort or protect responsibility thrown in to make you turn around occasionally. It's average justice dished out to the licence, but nothing more. [Christmas 2003, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The concept may be a worthwhile shot in the dark, but its choppy execution is straight to video.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The artwork goes some way to redeeming The Other Brothers; for all the detail to be found in the backgrounds and sprites, everything moves fluidly, but ultimately this is still a platforming game on the wrong platform.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game requires very little of what its title suggests. (…) If you make a leap of deduction, the game won't proceed until your character, through exhaustive dialogue choices and object examinations, has caught up. [Feb 2011, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game's major flaw, however, is its brevity. [July 2010, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At worst, it feels like a hollow exercise in brand extension, a game where the brand itself is utilised to provide a recognisable veneer, and nothing more. It’s an amiable but unremarkable card-battling title, a robust but unspectacular game. [Feb 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With the exception of the three bosses, there are no escalations or climaxes, no set-pieces, ambushes, chokepoints or challenges that involve anything more than the eradication of a roomful of enemies by way of laboured strafes and hops. [Sept 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Your main objective is the bane of the modern FPS: follow a little blue arrow while shooting things, with the odd escort or protect responsibility thrown in to make you turn around occasionally. It's average justice dished out to the licence, but nothing more. [Christmas 2003, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    SSX
    
In looking outside itself for inspiration, SSX has found a worthy infrastructure to establish an online community and culture. But this same approach has found the brand veering away from some of the fun and fireworks of yesteryear, leaving its more seductive silly side out in the cold.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's no fluidity or smoothness to combos and combat, so matches are garbled and verge even closer to feeling arbitrary than fight games usually threaten to do. Limited entertainment. [June 2003, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's a certain amount of wit and flair evident throughout Hoodlum Havoc's cut-scenes, and there are certainly some very slick production values. The problem is that, in terms of raw enjoyment, the game is somehow underwhelming. [May 2003, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s too fantastical, its violence occurring anywhere and everywhere to ever-decreasing effect. [Apr 2008, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    All but shorn of their narrative context, the missions can feel rather inconsequential, disconnected from the truncated plot and lacking the variety and invention of some of the 3DS game’s later missions.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gun
    Why roam freely (when the game lets you, which is by no means always) when all that’s out there to find is an empty trek between jarring episodes of production-line gaming? [Christmas 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s a fine-line between rote-learning frustration and seat-of-the-pants glee in on-rails arcade games, and Secret Rings wobbles either side of it perceptibly, but seldom stays on the wrong side for too long. [Apr 2007, p.81]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With the game's over-reliance on backtracking and aimless overworld item hunts, another shooting segment is never more than ten seconds away, resulting in a jarring, disjointed flow... In the end, Sigma Star Saga does justice to neither of its two loosely conjoined games. [Oct 2005, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Octodad: Dadliest Catch asks you to overlook an awful lot more than plot holes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a freemium game, masquerading as a paid download.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With the exception of fleeting moments, the game's milquetoast mechanics don't cut it - watching a superspy and being one are very different things. [Christmas 2010, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Once you've wiped away the layer of gore, you're left with an experience that, expectedly, offers limited entertainment. [March 2005, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Much of the drive spurring players onwards to completion depends on the game’s cutscenes, and in this respect it’s a backwards step, relying on the crutch of a strong licence to hide fundamental shortcomings. [Christmas 2007, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a whole, Mercenary Kings is a case study in the perils of Early Access. The need to provide a steady flow of content to early buyers has birthed a glut of superfluous systems and a swollen set of missions – the wrong sort of substance to accompany Robertson’s style.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Warrior Kings: Battles mixes and matches familiar mechanisms in interesting ways, but it proves that balancing real wargaming with resource-based empire building is as precarious a task as ever. [June 2003, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Cleverest when at its most minimal, It's Mr Pants is a little too convoluted and coy a brain-tease, destined to live in the shadow of purer designs. [March 2005, p.93]
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rare’s late-‘90s obsession with currencies and unlockables, combined with the new additions to adventure mode, make Diddy Kong Racing feel at times like a maze of conditions and transactions in search of an actual game, and put many of its attractive new features behind bars with no word of how to free them. [Apr 2007, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game's failure to monopolise on its squad dynamic relegates it to a shooter-by-numbers, and its appeal is then further undercut by the fact that, while Barker clearly has a sense for the grotesque, it is the only note that Jericho plays. [Dec 2007, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game fumbles its potential with unanticipated incompetence. [Christmas 2007, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The pacing, thanks to a combination of necessary haste and the weakness of your divided squad members, feels more akin to a corridor shooter; there’s a constant sensation of feeling harried and hemmed in. [Oct 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Many of the new additions do not work. [May 2015, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The inadequacies of the PSP camera shatter what little illusion is conjured. At one point, Brian Blessed whispers. All is not right in the world. [Jan 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Proves that what works as a prototype does not necessarily translate to a final product. [May 2015, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nobody, nobody at all, walks into a game shop and thinks: "Hey, goblins are pretty cool. Today I want to be a goblin." When the goblins in question have been rendered with almost no character or charm, this merely compounds the lack of emotional connection. [Mar 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A largely muddled package. [Nov 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Prince Of Persia’s overalls structure never quite compels, it offers too few distractions to qualify as a sandbox, nor does it possess the quick narrative impetus of more linear games, ultimately feeling a little shallow and repetitious. [Jan 2009, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Given the power at the player's fingertips to rewind, pause, fast forward and even record time, the scope for creating some genuinely engaging and ingenious situations is still as immense as it ever was. But, in actuality, everything is blandly obvious and ironically one-dimensional, and the use of the rewind function is still as chronological as it ever was. [Jan 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Embracing and supporting a community project like this is still a commendable move, and one that Mega Man's passionate fans may see as encouraging. But only his most die-hard followers will be willing to overlook such unwelcome, avoidable flaws.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Headstrong's effort shows a developer of some calibre, with a clutch of decent ideas, bowed beneath the weight of a multimedia franchise and hobbled by family friendly obligations. Its execution is uneven besides, but the challenge is so light that its flaws are largely irrelevant - and, unfortunately, that applies to the game's few triumphs too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For all its luxurious visuals, it knows little about how to marry them to gameplay, or how to end the suffering of artists who 
see their work butchered to meet gameplay's demands.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There’s no sense of strength or weight to your actions despite how extravagant the carnage becomes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Just as Double Dash's random nature levels newcomers and experts but means the game will never be as satisfying in the long term, so Gacha Mecha Athlete's flaws are initially forgivably amusing, but ultimately wearing. [Sept 2004, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unlike iOS title The Room, here intricacy proves a weakness, and Open Me doesn’t have the rich atmosphere of Fireproof Games’ award-winning puzzler to compensate for its mechanical awkwardness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With no meaningful equivalent to the communal goals and tactical layovers that gave Planes a stay of execution, once the paywall stalls your progress like leaves on the line, there’s little reason to continue. Even for those who’ve ‘supported’ NimbleBit with regular IAP donations, you suspect the Bux stop here.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Mission design feels particularly lazy this time round, Locomotive seemingly jotting down amusing cutscene scenarios before finding tenuous ways of tying ‘destroy this’ or ‘abduct that’ tasks to the constant stream of ooh-er references to ‘big willies’ and ‘meat’ in the dialogue. [May 2008, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Where B-Boy crucially disappoints is in the execution of its gameplay. The turn-based nature of its stages is interminably frustrating. [Oct 2006, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Given that its bland combat is little enhanced by the ability to create cover, you suspect that the promises made for the technology have simply dug its own grave. [Dec 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    At its best, Orgarhythm's disparate ingredients coalesce into scenes of thrilling tribal warfare, a winningly eclectic soundtrack stirring your men to march into battle. Too often, however, you end up feeling like your fragmented cabal: disorientated, frustrated and battered into submission by an unforgiving enemy, with little reason to keep on fighting.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that’s both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a solid concept, but Honeyslug struggles to develop it in any meaningful way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The plot may be filled with sub-Lynchian fumbles, but it weaves an intriguing story, while the charismatic muddle of awards that accompanies each solution goes some way to wiping away the grey memory of what you're actually being congratulated for.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    If the Old West is anything, it's a giant myth, and one that the Call Of Juarez games have always embodied. What The Cartel replaces this with – a mishmash of 
The Shield and conspiracy theories – is a much less substantial vision, played out within a world with no real resonance to it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a game that makes you desperately want to feel like a Jedi, arcing your lightsaber across the screen, ducking under attacks, parrying counters and going in for the kill, but the subtlety just isn’t there. [July 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's in need of plenty more flair, not so much that it strains against what its buttoned-down framework is trying to achieve, but just to inject some feeling of variety into its skirmishes and sorties. [Sept 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    What it didn't factor into the design is that kleptomaniacs rarely bother collecting items without emotional gravitas, and this oversight becomes immediately obvious when you compare Rumble to its source material. [Jan 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Soldier of Fortune’s damage model is probably its major selling point and, lamentably, the only thing that makes its combat entertaining. [Feb 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a title trying hard to inject personality into the genre, the experience feels irreparably mechanical. There's plenty of variety in terms of racing categories and machinery, but the overall lack of involvement is inexcusable. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Moops isn't a bad idea for a iOS title, then, but it's extremely poorly implemented. For a game about bug hunting, it's failed to catch enough of its own.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Yes, Beat Down revives the warped charisma of Capcom’s beat’em up heyday, but that’s the only area where it actually triumphs. [Oct 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Playing it instils a completely neutral response, as though it were no more than a means of absorbing time. [Jan 2008, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Even with just an additional pair of buttons for camera movement, a broad switch of irritations could have been avoided, but as it is, Death Jr is recommended only for forgiving platformer enthusiasts. [Nov 2005, p.113]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Cheap bosses and stingy save points ensure that it's a drag as well as a bore, while a handful of crash bugs do very little to improve proceedings. My Little Hero's greatest charm is its air of sweet innocence, perhaps, but in truth this adventure is primitive rather than childlike.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Bad Day LA is the game people often say they want and then ignore when it arrives; it prizes ambition over execution and flair over finesse and both pays the price and reaps the rewards for daring to do so. [Sept 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The last thing on Glory Days’ mind is fun: it instead angrily stomps forward to the beat of the ‘war is hell’ drum. [Oct 2007, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You can see things worth admiring here. The promise of sandbox combat emerging from the interplay between environment and gun-modes never comes good, instead devolving into a repetitive, gruelling bedlam - but that promise alone is more than many shooters offer. To make anything of it, however, Hard Reset would need to go right back to the drawing board.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Blacksite is a thoroughly unexceptional title for which unrealistic promises were made, and one that is further let down by a wide assortment of bugs and design issues. [Jan 2008, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Voyeurs will be disappointed, since the sex portrayed is the very model of conventionality. The really shocking thing is how close Singles gets to being wholesome. [June 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For such a costly flagship title to provide neither the promised statement of mainstream grown-up appeal nor even polished, lesser disposable thrills is a landmark failure. [May 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Something of a departure, sure, but it's nothing new. Falling awkwardly between action and strategy, it's unlikely to satisfy anyone other than rabidly obsessive fans of the character.
    • Edge Magazine