Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,611 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Bayonetta 2
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,611 game reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a game that skilfully blends the safe with the courageous in an alchemical fusion of old and new, somehow brave and default all at once.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a superior control system and a raft of incisive upgrades, this year’s update is a connoisseur of the boxing arts. [Apr 2005, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s debatable whether Oblivion is a great adventure, but it’s certainly one of the broadest around and one that’s a willing canvas for a variety of approaches from its players. [May 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the big dumb act of blowing its extraordinary world to kingdom come, Crysis finds itself smarter than ever. [Nov 2008, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stacking's best qualities are its eccentricity and ingenuity. The puzzles lack the tortured bite of Double Fine's early work, but in broadening the narrative-led puzzle game's scope and carefully choosing which elements of tradition to keep and which to discard, Stacking is a bold and charming reinvention.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The strength of the Mario RPG series has always been the convincing lunacy with which it depicts the 'ordinary' life of the mushroom kingdom. You may have steered Mario through some strange odd-jobs in your time, but Paper Mario 2 is your best chance to actually be him. [Christmas 2004, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The most comprehensive remake Nintendo has ever undertaken. [July 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While it's not as cleverly structured as the pinnacle of the series, "Symphony of the Night," it resurrects that game's hallmarks of seductive exploration and satisfying topographical progress. It breathes new life back into one of viedogaming's oldest franchises. [Jan 2004, p.92]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Other M dabbles in cinematic tricks and sensational set-pieces, but its strength is in the foundations: it builds an enveloping 3D world from straight lines and right angles, and ups the gears of its rewarding basics constantly. It offers an uncluttered slice of sci-fi action, a singular take on the thirdperson adventure, and a combat system of pared-down beauty.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Temple Run 2 is a beautiful looking, natural extension of the series that never breaks stride for a second. The game's only liability is that, as beautiful as its environments may be, their unceasing repetition can eventually grow wearisome. Like a child hearing about the concept of living in heaven for eternity and asking, won't I get bored?
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Isn't a game that does anything obviously or overtly clever or innovative. But any game that takes such a simple premise and polishes it, hones it and refines it until it's this engrossing, this absorbing, and this much fun, is quite obviously doing something very clever indeed. [Christmas 2003, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Packed with detail, both in terms of its environments and mechanics, this is a game that pays back investment in spades. [March 2012, p.122]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever the oddities and missed opportunities of its singleplayer mode, Bad Company 2 delivers a fulsome online game that continues to hone a winning formula. [Apr 2010, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The frame-rate occasionally chugs, but little else can truly hold Mr. Dreamer back. This is a confident twist on a popular genre, and a case study in how a good idea needs little embellishment.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    That teetering battle between pride and strategy than ensues every time you decide whether to comprehensively flatten a villain with an unnecessary monosyllabic flourish or gamble on saving it for your next target, hoping the board doesn’t get scrambled before you get a chance to show off.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Vivid, smart and perhaps a little mocking, then, Infinity Gene, like Extreme, has exchanged the cold depths of space for the trippy vortex of some strange digital migraine: this classic isn't growing old with grace, but it's certainly continuing to evolve.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While a smattering of minor blemishes mean it shines a bit less brightly than 2014's other headline acts, it's not less essential for it. [Jan 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In your travels you'll stumble upon and unfold an intricately spun web of character interactions, warmly drawn personalities every bit as rewarding to explore as the physical environments themselves. [Sept 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Reveals that the series can be both a chaotic toy box and a lattice of fantastical set-pieces that unfold meaningfully. [July 2011, p.126]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Enslaved's greatest achievement is standing out in the crowded field of me- too, colour-sapped videogame apocalypses, serving as a vibrant oasis in the otherwise murky brown wastes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether she’s huddled up against the cold or sending five men to their doom with an explosive arrow, this is still Lara Croft, one of gaming’s most distinctive heroes – and now she has a personality that extends far beyond the bounds of her bra straps. If the purpose of a reboot is to redefine a character and set them up for the future, then this is a job well done.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It can be too obtuse at times, but the rewards are quite unlike anything else in games: the music peaks, a laser beam rockets off into the sky, and you turn, heading off after that distant synth, in search of your next project deeper in the neon unknown.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nintendo’s nervousness around punishment, for fear of putting off newcomers, continues to undermine ALBW’s attempts at novelty.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Compulsive and beautifully tuned, Pivvot is a tense, nervy challenge to relish.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In terms of the game’s central challenge, it excels at dividing the player’s attention between ambitions for continuous expansion and the manual maintenance of the empire as it stands. [Sept 2007, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that's no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a game confident enough in its core ideas to simply offer greater volume and variety of enemies in its later stages, and it has the balance and poise to ensure that's more than sufficient.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like a kaleidoscope, El Shaddai offers a constant variety – sometimes confusing and out of focus, but often sparkling brilliantly. So long as you're not looking for any deeper meaning, you'll find plenty of novelty and beauty here, if not quite an eternity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Codemasters is as attuned to track-building and racecraft as it has ever been. [Oct 2009, p.92]
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game’s major achievement is an emphasis less on personal advancement, but rather on working as a cohesive unit to achieve your collective goal – the hunting of monsters, truly absurdly monstrous monsters... It’s an excellent exercise in humility and cooperation, and one that should not be passed by. [Dec 2005, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These are the most generous entries since HeartGold and SoulSilver. [Jan 2014, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seasoned with tragedy and humour, it’s a poignant tale that courts cliché but which, thanks to its charm and creative twists on well-worn themes, represents one of the narrative high points of the series. [Apr 2009, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As with Ocarina, at first there is a rush of nostalgia. As it fades, it's replaced by the realisation that, in many ways, the original was the playable prototype and this is the true final product, a fantastic fit both for the hardware's portability and feature set.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its characters may initially seem to be lazy stereotypes, but they soon blossom into something deeper, thanks to intelligent writing and uncommonly naturalistic acting. [Dec 2008, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a superior control system and a raft of incisive upgrades, this year's update is a connoisseur of the boxing arts. [Apr 2005, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These are the most generous entries since HeartGold and SoulSilver. [Jan 2014, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This relaxed, arcade-like approach makes for something that's not so much about simulation, but more emulation; letting you thwack the ball with all the verve of an expert, without the worry of any homework. Fun, then, and lots of it. [Nov 2003, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a superior control system and a raft of incisive upgrades, this year's update is a connoisseur of the boxing arts. [Apr 2005, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Advanced Warfare is still Call of Duty, but it's more playful, knowing and refreshing than COD's been in years. [Christmas 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    BF2142 fails to stimulate to the same levels as previous titles in the series, all of which have benefited from a more solid grounding in real-world settings and situations. [Dec 2006, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a game that takes its fantasy as seriously as it needs to be, which is to say both lightly and with rigour in homage to the communal games that make up videogames’ heritage. But it’s also a real original.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Relic has spent four years honing a distracting interface, revitalising a less-than-perfect control system and, above all, recreating anew the sense of majesty and scale that originally distinguished this deep-space strategy title. [Nov 2003, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Few games are as initially opaque as Starseed Pilgrim, and few offer as rich a dawning sense of discovery in return.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Motorstorm has a special relationship with chaos, and if you can keep your head when all about you are throwing their controllers, you're just as likely to lose. Less battle than survival racing, it's happy to let fairness be a stain on the tarmac. [Apr 2011, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gameplay purists may scowl, but Read Dead Revolver is a triumph for beautifully observed atmospherics, characterisation and slapstick set-pieces you cannot fail to enjoy. [June 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Game designers talk of emphasising character through dialogue or animation, but his may be the first incidence of a game emphasising it through a control method. Its immediacy means you'll share every inch of his swaggering, gleeful, unstoppable violence. [Feb 2005, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The majority of SMB is a finely executed tightrope act of death and rebirth, as funny as it is fun and as precise as it is inventive. [Christmas 2010, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a resourceful little game, then, mining laudable variety from an economy of ideas. It's amusing, too, littering its backgrounds with visual gags, including a sly reference to Angry Birds - even if one cake-related joke proves a meme too far. And it saves the best for last, with a final level that offers some thrillingly silly catharsis, managing to one-up its most obvious inspiration in the process.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While PixelJunk Shooter 2 may seem more like an expansion than a standalone game, there's no shortage of new ingredients to enrich what was already a lively concoction. [Apr 2011, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the game remains focused on atmosphere and aesthetics, concessions have been made to a more dynamic style of play. [Sept 2008, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It isn’t any kind of reinvention, but a revitalisation, with a style so rich that it becomes an integral part of the game’s substance; Psychonauts breathes imagination and individuality as effortlessly as most games steal from one another. [July 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some may argue over what the series should have become, but what’s important is that it has made that tough decision for itself, and established a rock solid foundation for inevitable, now justified successors. [May 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gameplay purists may scowl, but Read Dead Revolver is a triumph for beautifully observed atmospherics, characterisation and slapstick set-pieces you cannot fail to enjoy. [June 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It takes more than caffeine, luck and a nosebleed to truly become master of these streets, and this is Revenge's greatest achievement over its predecessor. The eight locations, split as usual into varied circuits, are arcade racing dreams given form. [Nov 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This relaxed, arcade-like approach makes for something that's not so much about simulation, but more emulation; letting you thwack the ball with all the verve of an expert, without the worry of any homework. Fun, then, and lots of it. [Nov 2003, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s gorgeous; Resogun draws on its host hardware’s graphical capabilities to make you feel like the most powerful entity in the room.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Puzzlejuice may ultimately be too hectic and exhausting to stay on the front page of your iDevice forever, but it's the perfect game for an unhealthy binge every few days. Enjoy it as much as you can, and try not to burn yourself out for good.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if some of the fundamental stuff has been sacrificed to the creation of this huge world, Fuel still makes it across the finish line on a far-from-empty tank. [July 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It sends traditional multiplayer mores into a dizzying spin and, bolstered by a cheery script and amicable tone, creates ever-evolving thrills across the course of the singleplayer campaign.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its flaws stand out in the short singleplayer campaign, and its tail end relies too much on the gunplay that the game otherwise relegates to a begrudging last resort. But when it hits its stride, the environments unlock the player’s tactical ambitions in away that is truly empowering, launching you between shadow and light, discretion and aggression.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Super Time Force hands you a super weapon that feels super – one that gives you the impression you’ve hacked into the game’s code to gain the upper hand – and then dares you to try to break the game with it. That it never buckles, despite allowing you to continually rewrite history as a horde of player characters and hundreds of projectiles fill the screen, is nothing short of remarkable.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a game that lives well within your comfort zone no matter how many bullets are flying, and how many enemies are kiting along behind you. It's a game about games, in other words – and a very good one, at that.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you take away the window dressing, the epic sounds and the preordained surprises this is a derivative, one-note and sometimes flawed game, but see it as a spectacular amusement ride and you can play and it's a distinguished achievement. [Christmas 2003, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sin And Punishment 2's real value lies in the (now online-enabled) hi-score tables and a brilliant risk/reward scoring system. [Christmas 2009, p.94]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Generous, polished and charmingly eccentric, Magnetic Billiards proves the benefits of deliberation - though if this is indicative of the quality the Pickfords can bring to iOS, here's hoping their next isn't quite so long in the making.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plagued by imbalance, the Round 3 career can serve up over 50 bouts before one goes the distance. The new stun punch – a thunderclap of a haymaker – helps to ensure first to third round knockouts for the vast majority of fights. [Apr 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    F1 2010 remains a game to be uttered in the same breath as Crammond's Formula One Grand Prix, Bizarre Creations' Formula 1 '97, and Ayrton Senna's Super Monaco GP II.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is ballsy, brash, confident gaming at its best - a lesson in how games don't have to be perfect to be brilliant. [Christmas 2003, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When so many games are trying to defend their value by cramming every mode and style into one unpalatable mix, it's refreshing to play something that's conceived with such vibrant, capricious clarity. [May 2004, p.104]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mercury exhibits a perfect hierarchy of challenge and reward... The pain becomes the pleasure because, in spite of the extraordinary degree of trial and error (practically requiring a degree in the subject), there’s never any moment that feels broken or exploitative. [June 2005, p.91]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Skate’s best trick is to make every landing seem like a tiny victory: with physics that at least pay lip service to the realities of gravity and broken bones, simply making it down a flight of steps can be cause for celebration. [Nov 2007, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Insomniac has stripped away every inch of slack, delivering a consistently entertaining title where platforming nestles tightly against puzzle solving and hugs shooting sections. [Oct 2008, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Half-Life’s narrative does nothing altogether new, and nothing to upturn the quite reasonable condescension of Roger Ebert and his peers in more mature media. But in an interactive genre bound to the traditions of the pop-up gun and invisible hero, it simply doesn’t get more sophisticated than this. [Aug 2006, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Playing Blek is pure intuition, not a puzzler so much as an act of freeform creation. That’s quite a feat within a genre which can feel so stiff and prescribed.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    MGS4 is not the game it could have been; nor is it the game it would have been had the series grown with the benefit of hindsight; nor is it the game it should have been if you believed that early trailer. But it is faithful to its fans, its premise and its heart, delivering an experience that is, in so many ways, without equal.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bright and breezy, it offers almost bottomless value, creates a believable and consistent world, offers a real strategic challenge as well as the kind of brainless completism that’s best suited to delayed trains and rainy afternoons, and hides a staggeringly intricate set of mechanics inside an accessible and non-threatening world. [July 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is as good as you'll find on DSiWare at the moment, and it'll likely stay that way until Q-Games comes up with another mini-marvel. [Feb 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This sense of restrictiveness filters through to ACIII's mission design. There are surprisingly few assassinations here, and relatively little freedom to plan an approach to them. It's mostly eavesdropping, tailing, chase sequences and battle scenes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For your money, however, this is the best new MMOG since Guild Wars 2 and arguably the most feature complete an MMOG has ever been on launch.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sins is undoubtedly a unique achievement, unifying realtime battle and empirical strategy where others have only managed to offer them as separate components. [Apr 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's loads to do here. [June 2010, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From the patchwork fields of the Dover coastline to the unforgettable sight of Berlin burning in the pouring rain, the carefully characterised locations are as integral to the experience as its encyclopedic line-up of planes. [Oct 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The sequel may have sacrificed a little of Maximo's knife-edge aura, but there's so much new here that it would be rude not to call Army of Zin even better. This is a sequel that stands up, and often glitters, on its own terms. [Dec 2003, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It has a masterful user interface. [July 2008, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    FFXI may not technically be the future of MMORPGs, as there’s no ignoring its derivative nature. However, it has cleverly assimilated all the elements that make the genre so popular and married them with international brand popularity well beyond the reach of other, more ghettoised MMORPGs. [Dec 2005, p110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The level of personality in the Patapons and their world makes up for any disappointments - and your involvement in their story becomes huge. [Mar 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the twitchy combat and compulsive collecting, it all comes back to those creaking mansions. Highly polished under their grime and cobwebs, the treats awaiting in their dark rooms prove Luigi’s subversive series still has the capacity to thrill.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The constant flow of new content makes it a game that will last as long as Sony’s console does – that is, if you’re prepared to make the financial investment required to maintain a song library. [Nov 2007, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a tale of swords and souls in which everyone keeps their dignity until you knock off their cuirass and make them fight in their bra. [Sept 2008, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The only occasionally clumsy element in Surge Deluxe’s otherwise efficiently streamlined processes is you – or, rather, your big fat finger. Tracing lines between blocks obscures the screen, which can make quick, precise movements difficult, especially between narrow gaps.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A sequel with a suitably Darwinian focus on simple refinement. [Nov 2008, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sakurai's prints are all over Uprising, providing a comeback that balances depth and accessibility with little compromise. [Apr 2012, p.122]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This relaxed, arcade-like approach makes for something that's not so much about simulation, but more emulation; letting you thwack the ball with all the verve of an expert, without the worry of any homework. Fun, then, and lots of it. [Nov 2003, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All things considered, it’s about the best game called ‘DJ Hero’ we were ever likely to see. It deserves extended play.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For console owners used to having to fiddle with power sliders in order to orchestrate their shots, it brings a nigh-on edible element of tangibility to the experience... An accomplished bundle. [May 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You’ll discover whether you’re a screamer or a yeller, a wide-striding groover or a bolt-upright pogo-er. This is a game that you can play sitting down, but you won’t. Not once. [Christmas 2005, p.104]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shooter feels accomplished and robust, a rounded and consistently enjoyable achievement. [Jan 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those accustomed to the adult world of online PC gaming may have reason to sniff at the more streamlined play, but Pandemic has given consoles a whole new genre, pretty much perfectly formed... No game has ever felt quite so much like playing with Star Wars figures. [Nov 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A personal and affecting play experience. [Mar 2008, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Race Driver 3 understands that a processional win from pole is less fulfilling than a hard-fought, championship-saving fifth place from the back of the grid. And though it can’t exactly engineer those situations, it does everything in its power to make them more likely and leave them unpunished. [Mar 2006, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine