Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,611 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Last of Us
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,611 game reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As forgettable as the story mode is, this is a game that should be judged by the pleasure it can bring to a room full of gamers eager for furious arena combat and a splendid variety of team games. And judged by those criteria, it has few peers. [Apr 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This dazzling, determinedly populist experience was not made according to the standards other games are made by, and when judged – or even just described – by those standards, it might seem slender to the point of frailty. [Christmas 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thank heavens, then, for the brilliant Survival mode. Of all Dual Strike’s little reinventions it’s the only one to twist the template into a persuasive new shape. [Sept 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a game for those who grew up in Hyrule but spent more time in Lordran in recent years. Some finicky platforming also frustrates, but then Link didn’t get an auto-jump until Ocarina Of Time.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s impossible to ignore the fact that, with titles like this, Nintendo has perfected a genre. [July 2007, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Novelist, then, is a game of endless compromise, and in that sense it is a quite remarkable simulation of family life.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Future Soldier exemplifies a developer honouring the 'fun first' ethos of its publisher's canon, even as it stays true to the seriousness of its espionage licence. Yes, it's lost some tactical edge, but a disciplined commitment to entertainment focuses the experience. In the overmasculine world of the thirdperson shooter, this is a game that stands out for being delicately beautiful even as it delivers brutal thrills.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Just when the whole thing seems in danger of becoming a cold study in design brilliance, however, the on-screen clock comes into its own, raising the game’s temperature by turning each challenge into a speed-runner’s dream.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The control system deserves special mention, as it could so easily have been crude or overwhelming. Instead, it's sophisticated and sensitive, catering solidly enough for corridor-cleaning run'n'guns while allowing ambitious flights of TK fancy. [Aug 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Warhawk's manic pace makes for an instantly gratifying experience, and its brilliantly implemented notion of flight and considered balance among combat options more than compensate for the slenderness of its offering. [Oct 2007, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    FFXI may not technically be the future of MMORPGs, as there’s no ignoring its derivative nature. However, it has cleverly assimilated all the elements that make the genre so popular and married them with international brand popularity well beyond the reach of other, more ghettoised MMORPGs. [Dec 2005, p110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For a new developer to arrive with a game that excels in as many categories as Far Cry is a rare thing indeed. This is a uniquely beguiling game, and frequently beautiful in every sense.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the games’ improved communication features, too, X and Y are truer to their narrative’s ethos: the joy of sharing moments of beauty and surprise with others. It’s a delightful message to send to a new generation of players, many of whom are just starting out on their own gaming journey.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some may argue over what the series should have become, but what’s important is that it has made that tough decision for itself, and established a rock solid foundation for inevitable, now justified successors. [May 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Make no mistake: this is a pair of games that will lead to formative moments in young lives, moments of the kind that will inspire a lifelong passion for the medium.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Enjoyably whipped through in three hours, And Yet It Moves finds rare extra pull in unlockable modes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The New Order is, above all, brave. Its odd mix of ’90s-style FPS excess and Nazi atrocities could have come across as outdated and crass. But MachineGames maintains just as much respect for its difficult subject matter as it does for its players, and the result is a game that indulges the mature and juvenile parts of your personality in equal measure.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s perhaps easier to admire than to enjoy, but those who are prepared to meet its bracing challenge may find themselves hooked by one of the smartest iOS games in some time.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bladestorm works hard to appease both the keen strategist and the action-hungry player, while confidently answering critics who claim that Koei is nothing more than a one-trick warhorse. [Christmas 2007, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a surprisingly effective template for an action game, offering all the explosions and feedback of a shooter, while leaving you with a warm feeling of smugness when things go according to plan.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Guild Wars 2 is a few brushstrokes short of a masterpiece, then, but ArenaNet has succeeded in trying to paint over the worst of the genre's cracks. Thanks to a rigorous programme of restoration, only sometimes do its underlying imperfections show through the glossy veneer.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hell Yeah! may wear its warm immaturity on its sleeve, but its jokes are strong, its protagonist and antagonists likeable and its rhythms satisfying.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In a world of family-friendly games whose desire to appeal to all makes them feel wishy-washy, it's a welcome splash of colour. [Nov 2008, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Supreme Commander is the polar opposite of lazy Sunday afternoon strategy: the anti-"Civilization." With a name as apt as the infinite slaughter of "Total Annihilation," it really is a supreme commander’s job. [Mar 2007, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a game, it has problems. Indoor spaces will struggle to contain more than a few players (the maximum is seven) and with no rules governing conduct, smaller players are at a natural disadvantage if competition escalates. Still, as a statement of intent it is extraordinary, and feels characteristic of what Sportsfriends sets out to achieve – a realisation that simplicity and good company are the root ingredients of enjoying games, and that far from being decisive, visual sophistication might actually be entirely irrelevant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The true measure of this journey isn't where you end up, it's how fast your pulse is racing when each luminous tube finally spits you out into the darkness again. [Oct 2012, p.92]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ninja Gaiden is as good as it ever was, and the visual improvements can’t be faulted. The minor redesign of some of the levels is generally irrelevant next to the meat of the game, however, and not worth the update in itself. [Aug 2007, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In spite of its balance wobbles, Orcs Must Die 2 is a frenetic blast of co-op joy - the ideal 30-minute post-pint pick-me-up, be it a step-change sequel or not. [Oct 2012, p.106]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But the puzzles themselves are nearly an unmitigated joy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Spirit Tracks' aging tricks continue to carry you cack into the narcotic realms of pure ritual, until you're deep in the caverns yet again, holding the magic yellow boomerang once more, and wondering what quirky brilliance it will bring with it this time. [Christmas 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those expecting a tale on par with Atlus’ remarkable RPG may be disappointed, then, but Persona 4 Arena’s thoughtfully designed combat system has been well worth the wait.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The gravitational force is strong with this one.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ugly, punishing, and extremely satisfying, Gets To The Exit is a raw kind of fun. [Oct 2012, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yes, QatQi is a roguelike with words, and by the time it dawns, this ferociously smart game will have you hooked.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's no denying that Obsidian's soul was in the effort. [June 2015, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Race The Sun’s tracks remain as consistently well-paced and tiered as the raft of stages we’ve experienced to date, then it can be considered a success rather than an experiment: a confident genre hybrid worthy of your time and patience because who knows, today could be your day.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Advance Wars 2 isn't really Advance Wars 2, it's Advance Wars 1.5. Still a superb game, it's only close to perfect for those who've never experienced perfection before. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if its technical handicaps are clear, what it achieves with the palette at its disposal is astounding. Instincts' lower resolution textures, sporadic pop-up, cruder characters and jagged shadows are all clearly defined beneath its baking sun, but the composition of the overall canvas offers a masterful distraction. [Nov 2005, p.100]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While most shooters handle the genre's design tradition like fragile cargo, careful to ensure that its arrangement of pieces doesn't fall into disarray, Prey cranks it like a Rubik's cube, cocking its world delightfully askew. [Sept 2006, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A staggering display of imagination, design and performance. [June 2015, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if some of the fundamental stuff has been sacrificed to the creation of this huge world, Fuel still makes it across the finish line on a far-from-empty tank. [July 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Smilebit, led by Masayoshi Kikuchi – who has since moved on to work on the Yakuza series, another franchise that pivots around vivid city-building – swam upstream with JSR, defying the rush to photorealism, celebrating rebellion and individuality in one of the most memorable genre mash-ups you're ever likely to come across. Its HD revival is every inch that game, serving as a reminder that originality and passion retain their lustre when all else fades, and that such treasures are worth buffing up to display again.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eden has composed a beguiling, intoxicating hymn to the open road, and every car lover will want to join its chorus. [Oct 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you take away the window dressing, the epic sounds and the preordained surprises this is a derivative, one-note and sometimes flawed game, but see it as a spectacular amusement ride and you can play and it's a distinguished achievement. [Christmas 2003, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a thoroughly successful evolution of the twitch shooter, broadening its scope both upwards and outwards as well as expanding its toolset.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No other combat game has maps this lavish, or ambitiously designed. [Nov 2007, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Collaborative play transforms the challenge. [June 2015, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Race Driver 3 understands that a processional win from pole is less fulfilling than a hard-fought, championship-saving fifth place from the back of the grid. And though it can’t exactly engineer those situations, it does everything in its power to make them more likely and leave them unpunished. [Mar 2006, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But for all the excellence on show, there's no shaking the sense that this is a game that does everything that was asked of it, but nothing more. [Christmas 2006, p.72]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Deceptively simple. [June 2015, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's disappointing that basic irritants are still evident in the singleplayer game. But it's the online version - which takes the hunter/hunted metaphor to chilling extremes - which ends up being one of the most nerve-racking gaming experiences of all time. [Apr 2004, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are small gripes – having to use an undo button rather than pick tiles back off the grid irks in 'standard' scenarios, for instance – but they slowly melt away in the face of such eclectic gameplay. Seating arrangements have rarely felt so intelligent, knowing, or inventive.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "Killzone 2" has the technology and spectacle; FEAR 2 has class, direction and a most mischievous sense of humour – and technology and spectacle. [Mar 2009, p.84]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This dazzling, determinedly populist experience was not made according to the standards other games are made by, and when judged – or even just described – by those standards, it might seem slender to the point of frailty. [Christmas 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Masterfully done, and certainly set to become an instant Wii and PC cult hit. [Dec 2008, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The perfect candidate for the 100th WiiWare game, LostWinds is on the verge of outgrowing the service it almost single-handedly redeems. [Dec 2009, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever you conclude about the bigger picture, this is special stuff. The claustrophobic buzz of flies, the distant muezzin drone, the desperation as you crouch uncertain in the dust whilst your men call frantically for orders will lodge in your mind long after you've walked away from the game. [July 2004, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Open about the toys you can play with in the final stages of research, strategy in Supreme Commander 2 is pure – worked out before the battle begins and maintained as a line under your tactical moves.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game is sumptuously constructed - its spindly and grotesque sense of caricature is a delight and the lively score is maddeningly hummable. [Apr 2010, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bold and distinctive. [March 2014, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Instantly familiar, and instantly entertaining, Nintendo could hardly have picked a better title for its wi-fi debut. [Christmas 2005, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s all here: the hoi polloi, the ambience, the weather, the police pressure, and the emergent scenarios that can make you feel special or wretched. It feels familiar, but remains primed for fresh exploration and mischief, reapplying a formula that still feels superior to its imitators’ approaches. [Christmas 2005, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fat with content, melodrama and fun, few DS games can match its ambitions. [Apr 2010, p.98]
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Prose With Bros is irresistible: the interface is clean and simple, voting is snappy, and the algorithm producing each game's jumble of words delivers perfectly innocent but eminently corruptible English every time.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The franchise is now only a fraction away from realising its full potential. [June 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The expanded range of strategic choice and admirably polished presentation push Grimoire Of The Rift right into the top tier. [Sept 2008, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    How apt that interactivity and fiction should finally merge in a fiction about interactions. The dead are restored, and the genre with them. [Feb 2011, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bright and breezy, it offers almost bottomless value, creates a believable and consistent world, offers a real strategic challenge as well as the kind of brainless completism that’s best suited to delayed trains and rainy afternoons, and hides a staggeringly intricate set of mechanics inside an accessible and non-threatening world. [July 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From the near-pornographic money-shot that occurs during the slo-mo moments of certain vicious attack combos, to the ludicrous events that send the player travelling down a monster's throat, God of War is made from the stuff of legend, to become the stuff of legend.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not every layer of Talos finds its mark, but the discourse created by navigating them is a brain-taxing process to match the genre's greats. [Feb 2015, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For console owners used to having to fiddle with power sliders in order to orchestrate their shots, it brings a nigh-on edible element of tangibility to the experience... An accomplished bundle. [May 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a well plotted and paced, if straight-laced, action adventure that takes most of the strengths of the main franchise while removing a few of the weaknesses. [Christmas 2010, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Napoleon ultimately feels like the more successful younger brother to Empire. It fundamentally shares its DNA, for better and worse, but has learned from its mistakes, and has stayed trim and buff.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This may be the age of the single-screen brawler, but TowerFall is among the most feature-rich of its kind.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The levels here are every bit as inventive as they were in Origins and, by the time your moveset has expanded to include a hover, wall-run and punch, every bit as punishing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Delta, Super Stardust has found a pulse. Perhaps all that's missing now is the soul to go with it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It certainly lacks the variety and sense of progress that great platform games can offer. But then it was never supposed to be a great platform game. It was supposed to be, and is, a great DS game. [Apr 2005, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But with Tetsuya Mizuguchi's often bland musical experimentation replaced with some of electronica's finest moments, Electronic Symphony breathes new life into a series that had previously appeared stagnant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So, yes, their irreverent take on the medium may have a few technical shortcomings, but you’ll usually be grinning far too much to care.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s surprisingly tactical.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    And the visuals? Well, if you want more screenshots, just pop your head out of the window and look up. [Dec 2007, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game's angled view and coloured stacks mean that some of the best moments – cascading chains that ripple outwards as the landscape collapses in a shower of points – can sometimes be the result of luck instead of judgement.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plagued by imbalance, the Round 3 career can serve up over 50 bouts before one goes the distance. The new stun punch – a thunderclap of a haymaker – helps to ensure first to third round knockouts for the vast majority of fights. [Apr 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s almost shocking how seamless, engrossing and accessible Fahrenheit is. It’s sad, then, that it shows weakness in the one area where it needed to be stronger than any other game: the script. [Oct 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a system that very naturally sets up some excellent multiplayer modes, and this is one of an elite few that can truly even the odds between players at different difficulty levels.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Race Pro engages like few driving titles manage, even if the driving model doesn’t quite meet the standards of the most advanced PC sim-racers such as Live For Speed. [Mar 2009, p.88]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's brash and beautiful, and in looking outside its own boundaries has found fresh ways to keep you coming back to the danger zone.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is without doubt the most comprehensive entry in Nippon Ichi's once-trailblazing series, packaging its accumulated ideas alongside a clutch of innovations of its own. And yet repetition has dulled the appeal, with the complexities acting as a tall barrier to newcomers while the innovations are simultaneously too meagre to sate any but the most eager devotee.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Come to terms with its idiosyncrasies and you’ll find a unique and wonderfully characterful action game; it’s well worth suffering those early scratches for the moments where it really begins to purr.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a masterclass of design purity: every one of these elements exists for a reason, and its potential is exploited to the fullest. But Samurai Gunn’s genius lies in its dizzying speed. It condenses organic, balletic setpieces worthy of an action flick finale into mere seconds, the ground filling up with the bloodied pixel remains of the fallen.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While it attempts to blend FMX, quad bikes and more familiar Trials action, the new elements sit uneasily with the old. Trials has always been about precision and skill, traits that are blunted or obfuscated by four-wheel drive and fussy inputs.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Funny and miserable, disgusting and endearing, the end result is a game that's smart enough to have things both ways, offering an often brutal critique of certain religious sacraments, while wallowing comfortably inside the rituals of one of gaming's oldest genres.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    SideScroller's final stages are arguably among the best things Q-Games has ever done, but be warned: if you're used to the puzzley pace of Shooter, you won't find its playful nature here.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a dazzling seamlessness to every aspect of Prototype 2. You feel it as you traverse the world, sprinting powerfully up buildings, bounding high into the air just as you reach the lip of the roof and then transitioning with a tap of the right trigger into a glide that will take you to the next rooftop.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This series offered some of the most memorable hours we spent holding a gamepad during 2012. [Feb 2013, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The biggest addition is the inclusion of collectables from each course, which provides a great incentive to exploring in Freeride mode, and brings a touch of Amped's atmosphere to a game that was all about the rush. [Dec 2003, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Boktai re-invigorates almost every aspect of the tired dungeon-and-items formula. The light-sensor technology works flawlessly and opens up a host of possibilities for future games. A beautiful game in almost every respect. [Oct 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Much of the attraction is largely due to the variety of racing on offer, but it's the overall quality of that racing that is responsible for ensuring Race Driver 2 remains an intensely engaging ride. [May 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A great marriage of presentation and design, spun with ravishing verve.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Regardless of the amount of familiarity, though, Echoes is as solid and tangible as ever: the uncluttered HUD, the gentle rumble as Samus touches down from her unfaltering jumps, the ingeniously tucked-away power-ups, the smoothness and surety of movement. Its combat and exploration, if taken separately, can feel a little hollow and basic, but taken together they're still a powerful combination for a rewarding adventure. [Christmas 2004, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine