Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,542 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Rock Band 3
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,542 game reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that's no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's almost shocking how seamless, engrossing and accessible Fahrenheit is. It's sad, then, that it shows weakness in the one area where it needed to be stronger than any other game: the script. [Oct 2005, p.84]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Race Driver 3 understands that a processional win from pole is less fulfilling than a hard-fought, championship-saving fifth place from the back of the grid. And though it can't exactly engineer those situations, it does everything in its power to make them more likely and leave them unpunished. [Mar 2006, p.87]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Earned In Blood might not seem like a radical departure from the original but the gloriously cascading AI and open maps have effectively transformed it into a very special WWII experience. The fact that there's nothing quite like it in such a crowded genre speaks volumes. [Dec 2005, p.103]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It takes more than caffeine, luck and a nosebleed to truly become master of these streets, and this is Revenge's greatest achievement over its predecessor. The eight locations, split as usual into varied circuits, are arcade racing dreams given form. [Nov 2005, p.98]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some may argue over what the series should have become, but what's important is that it has made that tough decision for itself, and established a rock solid foundation for inevitable, now justified successors. [May 2006, p.86]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plagued by imbalance, the Round 3 career can serve up over 50 bouts before one goes the distance. The new stun punch – a thunderclap of a haymaker – helps to ensure first to third round knockouts for the vast majority of fights. [Apr 2006, p.82]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Isn't a game that does anything obviously or overtly clever or innovative. But any game that takes such a simple premise and polishes it, hones it and refines it until it's this engrossing, this absorbing, and this much fun, is quite obviously doing something very clever indeed. [Christmas 2003, p.114]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Avalanche imparts the varying depths of snow, anything from sheet ice to knee-deep drifts, much better than its nearest rivals. Crouching for speed, leaping precipices and then absorbing the shock upon landing is a majestic sensation only bettered by the original. [Feb 2004, p.104]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite these minor imperfections F-Zero GX has it where it counts. The combination of blistering speed, responsive controls and rivals with genuine personality makes this one of the most addictive games of the year. [Oct 2003, p.96]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The plot is revealed in awkward clumps which never quite dovetail. There's no question, however, that Namco has managed to twist out a tale that sustains your interest across both discs. [Oct 2004, p.106]
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Viewtiful Joe will undoubtedly test your patience. But the moments that stay with you after you switch off the GameCube are characterised by inventiveness, wit, verve, charm style, vigour and, above all, fun. And that's not something that can be said of that many other games these days. [Sept 2003]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's difficult to shake the sensation that Killer 7 is an important production, as paving for future creative leeway if nothing else. But its likely love/hate status is testament to just how adamant it has attempted to be in its flair for extraordinary presentation. [Aug 2005, p.84]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Much of the enjoyment comes from the awe and wonder at discovering the simple things in the world. Where previous Harvest Moon titles encouraged workaholic tendencies … the thrill here is in experimentation. [Apr 2004, p.105]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In your travels you'll stumble upon and unfold an intricately spun web of character interactions, warmly drawn personalities every bit as rewarding to explore as the physical environments themselves. [Sept 2005, p.86]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At a time when Nintendo's status as a creative powerhouse is slipping, Pikmin 2 demonstrates that there's still no company that can touch it when it works its alchemy of rigorous play mechanics, artistic excellence, irrepressibly communicative characters and all-round appeal. [July 2004, p.102]
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Regardless of the amount of familiarity, though, Echoes is as solid and tangible as ever: the uncluttered HUD, the gentle rumble as Samus touches down from her unfaltering jumps, the ingeniously tucked-away power-ups, the smoothness and surety of movement. Its combat and exploration, if taken separately, can feel a little hollow and basic, but taken together they're still a powerful combination for a rewarding adventure. [Christmas 2004, p.76]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This relaxed, arcade-like approach makes for something that's not so much about simulation, but more emulation; letting you thwack the ball with all the verve of an expert, without the worry of any homework. Fun, then, and lots of it. [Nov 2003, p.107]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The GBA original invented a new way to tickle your brain, conceived by gamers for gamers and loaded with unabashed enthusiasm. And now you can play it with your friends. What better excuse for throwing a party? [JPN Import; Christmas 2003, p.118]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For console owners used to having to fiddle with power sliders in order to orchestrate their shots, it brings a nigh-on edible element of tangibility to the experience... An accomplished bundle. [May 2004, p.109]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The strength of the Mario RPG series has always been the convincing lunacy with which it depicts the 'ordinary' life of the mushroom kingdom. You may have steered Mario through some strange odd-jobs in your time, but Paper Mario 2 is your best chance to actually be him. [Christmas 2004, p.86]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a sequel, it's not so much an extension as a remix, but one so capable and confident that 'remix' could very well be one of Clover Studio's own personal VFX powers.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As forgettable as the story mode is, this is a game that should be judged by the pleasure it can bring to a room full of gamers eager for furious arena combat and a splendid variety of team games. And judged by those criteria, it has few peers. [Apr 2005, p.94]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Game designers talk of emphasising character through dialogue or animation, but his may be the first incidence of a game emphasising it through a control method. Its immediacy means you'll share every inch of his swaggering, gleeful, unstoppable violence. [Feb 2005, p.78]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that's no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This dazzling, determinedly populist experience was not made according to the standards other games are made by, and when judged – or even just described – by those standards, it might seem slender to the point of frailty. [Christmas 2005, p.101]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a superior control system and a raft of incisive upgrades, this year's update is a connoisseur of the boxing arts. [Apr 2005, p.103]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is ballsy, brash, confident gaming at its best - a lesson in how games don't have to be perfect to be brilliant. [Christmas 2003, p.102]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you take away the window dressing, the epic sounds and the preordained surprises this is a derivative, one-note and sometimes flawed game, but see it as a spectacular amusement ride and you can play and it's a distinguished achievement. [Christmas 2003, p.110]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The gloriously beautiful landscapes; the vital Jim Guthrie soundtrack; the pounding desire to see, explore and accomplish more of this ambient quest: these save the game from itself. It may be uneven in tone, but S:S&S is a triumphant experience nonetheless. It's a brand new page in the dusty book of adventure games, and an inarguable statement as to how much art and music can give to gaming.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    RR3D is the most convincing handheld iteration of the series to date, and an encouraging illustration of how 3DS's flagship feature can be more than a pretty visual twist. [May 2011, p.104]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a reminder that 'accessible' - along with 'Project', 'Gotham', 'Grid' and 'arcade' - isn't such a dirty word after all. [May 2011, p.92]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Swapping a picture-perfect landscape for New York's urban sprawl could have been disastrous, but Crytek has found variety in the setting, guiding the player through blue-grey skyscrapers, leafy green parks, rooftops at sunset and industrial harbours. [May 2011, p.90]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The choice to bring six armies to the pretend tabletop leaves Retribution short on one playthrough, but overflowing with things to do in comparison with its predecessors. [May 2011, p.95]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A great and progressive return to gaming's adventuring roots.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nonetheless, LA Noire is a success story. Over its 20-hour-plus length, it cuts a cross-section through the moral, social and geographical landscape of a city that carefully treads the line between a plausible '40s LA and the morally bankrupt City of Angels found in hardboiled fiction.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nonetheless, LA Noire is a success story. Over its 20-hour-plus length, it cuts a cross-section through the moral, social and geographical landscape of a city that carefully treads the line between a plausible '40s LA and the morally bankrupt City of Angels found in hardboiled fiction.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Forget the artful placeholder nature of the title, then: the rotating octopus character moves through a meticulous game built with a rare sense of poise.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A convincing example of how 
motion control can breathe new life into a niche genre. 
More than that, it's a masterclass in audio design and the emotive power of CG imagery.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Has enough in that expertly-pitched control system to keep you replaying the same courses over and over, relaxing into a groove before smashing through the score barrier on one perfect run. It's an iPhone game you'll come back to for the controls alone – and that's not something you can't say every day.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its nonsensical charm – cartoon aliens, sweeties that make planets, and a robot T-Rex – as well as a winning extra mode (which basically makes planets into timebombs) after completion rounds off an original and deep hybrid.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It gets far more laughs than it should, and special mention to its credits song: perhaps the finest ending on the App Store. Original, funny, and intense: for a game based on Snake, not bad at all.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What Dynamic Hunting captures is the back-and-forth rhythm of Monster Hunter fights, the swings between danger and all-out attack, the wounds and the frenzies.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Reveals that the series can be both a chaotic toy box and a lattice of fantastical set-pieces that unfold meaningfully. [July 2011, p.126]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sonic And Sega All-Stars Racing is the most fun karting game on iOS, and an update taking care of those online hiccups can only make it more essential.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    DaWindci's a sedate, slow burning thrill.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tiny Tower's ongoing tick-tock of cash and happy bitizens is a fantastic toy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's totally faithful, and if you're of a certain age worth it without question for the nostalgia hit and sheer fizz of the nutty robots and explosions.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    QuBit is only held back by itself: as a linear drive-into-things score attack game, it's a great one. But it never quite unfolds in the way that the very greatest do – a Space Giraffe or Geometry Wars – to reveal layer after layer of variation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The gravitational force is strong with this one.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Is it better than Flick Kick Football? It lacks the purity of Pik Pok's original, and isn't nearly so charming. But where Flick Kick lapses into formula after you reach a high enough score, Flick Soccer gets even more challenging – and in full flow, it can provide a magical experience.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    iBlast Moki 2, with its slightly bland charm, unremarkable origins and questionable English, isn't going to be the next Angry Birds. But while playing, you occasionally think it should be.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It sends traditional multiplayer mores into a dizzying spin and, bolstered by a cheery script and amicable tone, creates ever-evolving thrills across the course of the singleplayer campaign.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Quarrel DX is the funniest and most stylish word game around, with layers of strategy that go down so deep it sometimes feels you're just scratching the surface. Even without multiplayer this is an essential purchase. With multiplayer, it could take over the world – or, at the very least, be the thinking person's Angry Birds.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the odd misstep, Infinity Field is a great dual-stick shooter that moves into essential territory with its controls.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like a kaleidoscope, El Shaddai offers a constant variety – sometimes confusing and out of focus, but often sparkling brilliantly. So long as you're not looking for any deeper meaning, you'll find plenty of novelty and beauty here, if not quite an eternity.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As with Ocarina, at first there is a rush of nostalgia. As it fades, it's replaced by the realisation that, in many ways, the original was the playable prototype and this is the true final product, a fantastic fit both for the hardware's portability and feature set.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brutal and rather short, VVVVVV's also devious and darkly funny. It's a pedantic classic, and a game for watch-makers as much as speed-runners.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's done enough to shake a shambling wraith out of its coffin and render it an elegant, challenging treat.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When the cards become familiar enough to make zooming a thing of the past, Ascension flowers thanks to its speedy and unfussy online integration. A simple game to learn, it's one that builds into rich and complex battles, big and small. It probably won't impress the airhead in your life, unfortunately – but that's what iPint's for.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A great marriage of presentation and design, spun with ravishing verve.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Generous, polished and charmingly eccentric, Magnetic Billiards proves the benefits of deliberation - though if this is indicative of the quality the Pickfords can bring to iOS, here's hoping their next isn't quite so long in the making.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Funny and miserable, disgusting and endearing, the end result is a game that's smart enough to have things both ways, offering an often brutal critique of certain religious sacraments, while wallowing comfortably inside the rituals of one of gaming's oldest genres.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On balance, the fourth Forza gets things right. The franchise has earned its place at the forefront of console racing sims and has done more for advancing the social/online element than any of its rivals.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's brash and beautiful, and in looking outside its own boundaries has found fresh ways to keep you coming back to the danger zone.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The seamless integration of voice commands into a polished, thoughtful upgrade is Harmonix's slick finishing move. Dance Central 2 is a typical music game sequel – it works better, offers more, yet feels fundamentally the same – but it's a practised improvement to an already eye-catching routine.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The controls are excellent and the visuals might be a touch more rakish, but what really matters is that Radiangames has found a hectic pace that lends the blasting a kind of cumulative drama. In doing so, this until now polite series has picked up a bit of an attitude.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The inclusion of a food journal, detailing the ingredients you've used and those that haven't yet been found, will be manna for completists in another sparky, generous and amusing offering from Adult Swim.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is without doubt the most comprehensive entry in Nippon Ichi's once-trailblazing series, packaging its accumulated ideas alongside a clutch of innovations of its own. And yet repetition has dulled the appeal, with the complexities acting as a tall barrier to newcomers while the innovations are simultaneously too meagre to sate any but the most eager devotee.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As audiovisually accomplished as any game has been, at least on PC, its deference to prescribed spectacle is an assiduous realisation of blockbuster gaming tastes, with an increasing reliance on 'video' rather than 'game'. EA wants Battlefield 3 to be all things to all people, and it's right in thinking that the addition of a singleplayer duck shoot doesn't detract from its other substantial offerings. But in this act of imitation, and limitation, it disregards the choice and tactical empowerment which make the series near-peerless and preciously idiosyncratic in multiplayer.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It homes in, with a clockmaker's precision and a playful gleam in its eye, on what Mario does best.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In a world whose sales charts are regularly topped by ever-more-homogenised military shooters and action games, playing Origins feels like stepping into an alternate reality in which the 16bit era evolved by increasing in fidelity, not dimensions.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While this elegant underwater world may be a little too twee for some players, then, there are still plenty of reasons to dip into Bit Blot's inventive genre piece. Aquaria's as personable on the iPad as it was on the PC and Mac, and now you can cross the oceans on your morning commute.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With its pulsing, ever-changing playing fields and foppish rhythm-action audio elements, one of the main reasons to play Fractal is simply to enjoy its wonderful aesthetics.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where Is My Heart? revels in simplicity, beauty and restraint, yet the experience tempers such qualities by proving challenging, infuriating and exhausting.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    SideScroller's final stages are arguably among the best things Q-Games has ever done, but be warned: if you're used to the puzzley pace of Shooter, you won't find its playful nature here.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A brainteaser that's nervy, humbling, and strangely energising. If you can handle the stress, SpellTower is magnificent.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When it works, however, Infinity Blade II represents iOS gaming at its finest. For all Chair's improvements, the first game's nagging sense of hollow repetition will still set in eventually; it just takes longer to arrive this time. But until that point arrives, Infinity Blade II remains a defining, and essential, iOS experience.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's clear that Disney's ideas are far from drying up.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may look chaotic, but this is as controlled as iOS gaming gets. Immaculately calibrated touch controls give you the tools to escape even the most ferocious barrage, while the five stages challenge twitch reflexes, muscle memory and pattern recognition equally. One of the toughest games you'll ever play, then, but also one of the fairest.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Economical and clever, Pullblox is full of leftfield ideas that turn odd congregations of technology into quiet magic. At last, 3DS has a puzzle game with real depth.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    BioWare hasn't cast itself as a guerrilla movement trying to subvert the MMOG with The Old Republic. Instead it's been the Empire, working to produce a slick, gigantic experience that, in the time of free-to-play, feels polished enough to demand monthly fees. How long this empire – vast and imposing, but archaic in structure – will last in the face of newer MMOGs and their rebellious payment models isn't easy to discern. This isn't the first of a new order of MMORPG, but it may well be the last of the old.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ferociously compulsive.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's still a Soul Calibur game, but Project Soul has successfully designed it for a wider audience of casual and hardcore players alike, which was a key factor in Capcom's successful reinvention of its revered series. [Feb 2012, p.108]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Puzzlejuice may ultimately be too hectic and exhausting to stay on the front page of your iDevice forever, but it's the perfect game for an unhealthy binge every few days. Enjoy it as much as you can, and try not to burn yourself out for good.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thanks to this astonishing overhaul, it's now quite impossible to ignore. [Feb 2012, p.120]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yes, Wipeout 2048 conjures a less fanciful racing grid than we've seen previously, and it's also a less immaculate, less finessed racer than the home console iterations of the series we've played down the years. Instead, it's an attempt to try something new on the newest of platforms. While it may not offer something for everyone, when it flies, it soars.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Packed with detail, both in terms of its environments and mechanics, this is a game that pays back investment in spades. [March 2012, p.122]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all its inconsistencies, complexities, inadequacies and oddities, The Last Story offers an entrancing and seamless flow of interesting experiences. And surely that, in the final reckoning, is what counts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Waking Mars is ultimately a game about ecological balance, but it's the balance of a different kind – of art, narrative, and puzzle mechanics - that makes it so very satisfying to play.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Journey's real issue, if it has one, goes much deeper than that. It's a resolutely linear game in which your range of interactions is minimal. For some, that will make it a pretty but hollow novelty; boring, perhaps. But for those who play games to explore strange lands, see beautiful sights and to immerse themselves – for however brief a time – in a new world, Journey is perfect. And what's more, they'll find someone like them to share it with.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Delta, Super Stardust has found a pulse. Perhaps all that's missing now is the soul to go with it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But with Tetsuya Mizuguchi's often bland musical experimentation replaced with some of electronica's finest moments, Electronic Symphony breathes new life into a series that had previously appeared stagnant.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a third and final chapter, then, with all that implies. It's off-putting to new players, too busy tying up loose ends to dangle any threads of its own, and fails to stand up as its own game in the same manner as its predecessors. But it's also a spectacular, powerfully imagined and dramatically involving final act to one of gaming's richest sci-fi sagas.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a resourceful little game, then, mining laudable variety from an economy of ideas. It's amusing, too, littering its backgrounds with visual gags, including a sly reference to Angry Birds - even if one cake-related joke proves a meme too far. And it saves the best for last, with a final level that offers some thrillingly silly catharsis, managing to one-up its most obvious inspiration in the process.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sakurai's prints are all over Uprising, providing a comeback that balances depth and accessibility with little compromise. [Apr 2012, p.122]
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A solid and intricate Armored Core with the best online offering yet, lacking only the visual sheen to make the energy and pace of its combat shine. It's still an acquired taste, but once you've whetted your appetite, it's hard to resist.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The results are uncommonly nuanced and tactile, though perhaps that's no surprise given its creator's keen interest in digital sculpture.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rovio's latest is an evolution that feels considerably more ambitious than previous updates.