Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,596 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Grand Theft Auto V
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,596 game reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Atlus succeeds in creating another idiosyncratic concoction of narrative and play, one that twists convention as often as it builds upon it. [Sept 2009, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It gets far more laughs than it should, and special mention to its credits song: perhaps the finest ending on the App Store. Original, funny, and intense: for a game based on Snake, not bad at all.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combat is thrilling – each weapon packing a solid, vicious blast; movement suggesting heft and momentum. [Dec 2008, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rock Band: Unplugged’s heart is genuine and soulful, evidence perhaps that, in game-making as much as music-making, it pays to never forget one’s roots.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Superstar Saga does justice to Miyamoto-san's original vision: a world of deliciously impossible creatures and impeccably illogical logic. A world where you never know what'll happen next but, once it has, you know it's what always should have happened. [Jan 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Goat Up 2 wears its influences on its sleeve – from Pac-Man to Portal – and its attempt to blend the immediacy and pace of the former with the brain strain of the latter is a unique, effective proposition.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As audiovisually accomplished as any game has been, at least on PC, its deference to prescribed spectacle is an assiduous realisation of blockbuster gaming tastes, with an increasing reliance on 'video' rather than 'game'. EA wants Battlefield 3 to be all things to all people, and it's right in thinking that the addition of a singleplayer duck shoot doesn't detract from its other substantial offerings. But in this act of imitation, and limitation, it disregards the choice and tactical empowerment which make the series near-peerless and preciously idiosyncratic in multiplayer.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When the cards become familiar enough to make zooming a thing of the past, Ascension flowers thanks to its speedy and unfussy online integration. A simple game to learn, it's one that builds into rich and complex battles, big and small. It probably won't impress the airhead in your life, unfortunately – but that's what iPint's for.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is a playfulness to LostWinds that will surely extend its playtime beyond the bounds of narrative. [July 2008, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The conservative setting and lack of an engaging storyline may do little to excite RTS veterans but, in its ruleset, Ruse expands upon the genre in a way that goes beyond gimmick. [Oct 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Above all else, it's an infectiously cheery game that marches to a very different tempo. In that respect, Beat The Beat might just be the perfect swansong for Wii.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not take the genre into uncharted waters, and occasionally stumbles into cliche, but Gemini Rue is an accomplished homage that rivals the very titles that influenced it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's done enough to shake a shambling wraith out of its coffin and render it an elegant, challenging treat.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its troop AI is better than that of "FEAR," and environmentally more aware than that of "Far Cry." [May 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the finest WWII games of recent memory. Hidden & Dangerous 2 manages to distract you from errors that would cripple a lesser game through its sheer ambition and scale. [Christmas 2003, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bolstered by solid voice work and elegantly stylised art, this has an uncommon level of polish for a iOS title, while its ten-hour runtime justifies the premium price tag.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The singleplayer adventure is yet another sprawling, puzzle-heavy artefact hunt which, truth be told, is far bigger than we had any right to expect. [May 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Another excellent outing for Codemasters' rally team, but one that has possibly taken the series to its structural - and commercial - limits. [Nov 2003, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From its overpowered weapons and gormless AI to its pedestrian objecctives, the singleplayer game is as dumb as it is misguided – an embarrassment to the rather splendid mulitplayer game that, fortunately, represents all that's really important. [Dec 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As forgettable as the story mode is, this is a game that should be judged by the pleasure it can bring to a room full of gamers eager for furious arena combat and a splendid variety of team games. And judged by those criteria, it has few peers. [Apr 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As expectations are put aside and the game is explored for its own merits, it begins to provide a vast sense of potential that few games can muster. [June 2003, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Punch Quest isn't just good for a free-to-play game. It's good, full stop, infused with humour, depth and the most charming violence imaginable. Unless you're a skeleton knight, in which case the violence is offensive, troubling and needlessly graphic.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a range of nicely differentiated AI personalities to choose from in single-player, a decent local two-player option, and a rule set of unusual elegance and economy, The Octagon Theory leaves you with every reason to work your way towards mastery of this strange, underimagined battlefield. It won't quicken your pulse, but it will steadily rewire your brain; sometimes that's a far superior outcome.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The controls are excellent and the visuals might be a touch more rakish, but what really matters is that Radiangames has found a hectic pace that lends the blasting a kind of cumulative drama. In doing so, this until now polite series has picked up a bit of an attitude.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In keeping with the original, Otogi 2 is something of an empty vessel, but it's one of the most ornate and accomplished around, possibly the most excessively and obscenely beautiful videogame yet made. Games that are this electric and uniquely rewarding don't come along very often, whereas those with more complexity are commonplace. Take your pick. [Mar 2004, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As forgettable as the story mode is, this is a game that should be judged by the pleasure it can bring to a room full of gamers eager for furious arena combat and a splendid variety of team games. And judged by those criteria, it has few peers. [Apr 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Atlus's surgery sim is in rude health. [July 2010, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's totally faithful, and if you're of a certain age worth it without question for the nostalgia hit and sheer fizz of the nutty robots and explosions.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What will stop you in your tracks is the scale, detail and beuty of the environments. Even after repeated play it's impossible not to pause and breathe in the magnificant view from the top of the Deep Amazon Temple. [May 2004, p.94]
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s not much that can be said about Shadow Of The Colossus. Not because there aren’t pages to be written about the designs of the colossi, the wisdom of some of the puzzles involved in defeating them, or the deliberately ambiguous implications of the story, but because this is a game with so little content that to discuss specifics would be to tarnish an experience that needs to be approached with as few preconceptions as possible. [Christmas 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If there’s one great story in The Sims 3, it’s of how the biggest game in the world continues to act like it, expanding in some respects, shrinking in others, but always evolving. And it’s about EA learning more and more how to act like the world’s biggest developer, the production values, build quality and feature set here being almost overwhelming.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A labour of love. The core of the game might be a remake, but the features and polish applied move it beyond the realm of simple cash-ins to one of the finest games to grace PSN or XBLA yet. [Sept 2008, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    QuBit is only held back by itself: as a linear drive-into-things score attack game, it's a great one. But it never quite unfolds in the way that the very greatest do – a Space Giraffe or Geometry Wars – to reveal layer after layer of variation.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Irrespective of talent, taste, spare time or even online connectivity, it has something for anyone with even a tingle in their trigger finger. [Jan 2008, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever the oddities and missed opportunities of its singleplayer mode, Bad Company 2 delivers a fulsome online game that continues to hone a winning formula. [Apr 2010, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At the core remains the solid, steady hand of Halo, but those hoping Halo 4 would roll back Reach's intricacies and deliver an alternative to the current wave of console shooters will be disappointed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Much like a summer movie blockbuster, Split Second offers thrills galore, but there's a hint of glossy superficiality to it, too...Yet there are few games in the genre that create quite so many sharp intakes of breath and instances of unintentionally barked profanity as this one, and sometimes that's what racing gaming is all about. [June 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The details of each individual victory may fade with time, but you’ll never forget the fractal patchwork rippling beneath you, or the stormy static of the clouds that clash overhead.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Developer PAM has reinvented a game that no longer strives to be a thinking man’s alternative to Virtua, but something altogether superior. [May 2006, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The shift from WiiWare to 3DS, meanwhile, may not see Art Of Balance really benefiting very much from either the handheld's touchscreen or the developer's range of depth tricks, but it does add a generous suite of new levels - and it does raise the chances of a larger audience finally discovering this playful, wonderfully-calibrated puzzler.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Minor lapses in cohesion and polish drop Lumines short of the absolute completeness of "Rez," but it expands upon its concepts in ways even Mizuguchi followers couldn't have expected. It's a block puzzle that celebrates the joy of light and sound – to the question of whether the PSP can encourage new experiences, it's a resounding 'yes'.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gravity Rush might not always live up to the promise of its tutorial, but it's exactly the kind of original game that a fresh-faced system such as Vita needs, taking subtle, thoughtful advantage of its control inputs while showcasing its power.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where Is My Heart? revels in simplicity, beauty and restraint, yet the experience tempers such qualities by proving challenging, infuriating and exhausting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Compared to so many free-roaming games to date, it so rarely stumbles. It’s the very skeleton of the genre, those bones strengthened to the point where they alone can stand as a game, rather than serving as hangers for threadbare ideas to be dangled from. [Mar 2007, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It might not be a system seller, but provides further compelling evidence of the Wii controller’s lofty potential. [July 2007, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    OutRun 2 remains a pinnacle of the arcade racing tradition, a peak that, through both design and circumstance, may never again be topped.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the few games of its type you can actually play for an hour, take on one of its missions, and have a meaningful unit of experience. Staight in. Straight out. Gamer satisfied. [Sept 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Viewtiful Joe will undoubtedly test your patience. But the moments that stay with you after you switch off the GameCube are characterised by inventiveness, wit, verve, charm style, vigour and, above all, fun. And that's not something that can be said of that many other games these days. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Much of the enjoyment comes from the awe and wonder at discovering the simple things in the world. Where previous Harvest Moon titles encouraged workaholic tendencies … the thrill here is in experimentation. [Apr 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Finally, Sega can dust off that classic marketing line, because once you've played Vanquish, everything else seems a little bit slow. [Dec 2010, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The new control system may ultimately be an upgrade Samus Aran never really needed, but this is still the best – and most logical – Wii reissue from Nintendo to date.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When it works, however, Infinity Blade II represents iOS gaming at its finest. For all Chair's improvements, the first game's nagging sense of hollow repetition will still set in eventually; it just takes longer to arrive this time. But until that point arrives, Infinity Blade II remains a defining, and essential, iOS experience.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The 3DS' first fighting game happens to be a version of one of the genre's best, and it's lost little in the conversion to a portable system. Token additions, such as the cute-but-unworkable Dynamic (3D) View, bulk out the package, but it's what's stayed the same that's the real triumph here. SSFIV is just as vibrant, fluid and confident as ever – and it's just been unshackled from your TV.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The best tennis game of this generation, if not ever. A crisp, responsive and consuming sports title where the act of hitting the ball is made so effortless that your focus can be instantly diverted towards thinking about tactics and exploring the subtle depth on offer. [Jan 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Makai Kingdom feels more about brutal stat farming than true tactics… Makai Kingdom’s key strategy isn’t so much tactics as just sheer weight of numbers, of accumulation and refinement of properties. [Oct 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s ostensibly an action game, but much more slowly paced than that term would suggest. It’s not quite an RPG either, although there’s levelling and grinding involved. And while its world isn’t open – each area is segmented into numbered zones – it’s a sandbox game in every other respect. Guild quests offer a skeletal structure, but there’s no pressure to stick to it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This welcome focus on spectacle – and the highly recognisable cast – makes Injustice more accessible than most modern fighting games, but there’s plenty to appeal to seasoned players.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Amped 2 is Amped with the right trigger gently pressed: it's tweaked. Balance meters take away some of the series' grace, but make it more of a game, like Tony Hawk's tilted downwards. [Christmas 2003, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s difficult to shake the sensation that Killer 7 is an important production, as paving for future creative leeway if nothing else. But its likely love/hate status is testament to just how adamant it has attempted to be in its flair for extraordinary presentation. [Aug 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Over the Top has tempered its obvious ambition with skill and understanding, and the result is a game that’s refreshingly quick to take flight.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the odd misstep, Infinity Field is a great dual-stick shooter that moves into essential territory with its controls.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What Fireproof has done, in other words, is to literally wrap the mechanics of a point and click adventure, with its abstract puzzles and occasionally opaque logic, around these fantastical contraptions, before suffusing the experience with an air of ghostly mystery.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its ideas are streamlined, its tight boundaries narrowing what could have been an overwhelming proposition, plunging players all the sooner into compelling strategic depths. [Christmas 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Full of bravado, packed with features and brimming with invention, this 20-year-old veteran is as vital and relevant as ever. [Jan 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Isn't a game that does anything obviously or overtly clever or innovative. But any game that takes such a simple premise and polishes it, hones it and refines it until it's this engrossing, this absorbing, and this much fun, is quite obviously doing something very clever indeed. [Christmas 2003, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A brainteaser that's nervy, humbling, and strangely energising. If you can handle the stress, SpellTower is magnificent.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Criterion’s ability to make the technology and design of games seem harmonious is a significant strength in an industry where few can pull it off... Black is a fiery example of what can result. [Mar 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nonetheless, LA Noire is a success story. Over its 20-hour-plus length, it cuts a cross-section through the moral, social and geographical landscape of a city that carefully treads the line between a plausible '40s LA and the morally bankrupt City of Angels found in hardboiled fiction.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even in its current form, there’s a wealth of ideas and a set of powers that few games twice this length manage to pack in.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The most remarkable thing is how smoothly it runs: a flawless 60 frames a second that makes any caveats about the slightly pixellated visuals disappear in the wind. [Dec 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nonetheless, LA Noire is a success story. Over its 20-hour-plus length, it cuts a cross-section through the moral, social and geographical landscape of a city that carefully treads the line between a plausible '40s LA and the morally bankrupt City of Angels found in hardboiled fiction.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It revitalises both old and recent characters and, despite the basic environments having the odd clunky element in their geography, triumphantly succeeds as a new breed of fighting game. [Oct 2009, p.90]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a smart iOS game that reduces a sport to its basic elements like this - and an even smarter one that can then turn those elements into something that feels entirely new. Three points.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The darling of the indie scene for so many years, it's a pleasure to see the game proving itself all over again. [June 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This game's focus is its singleplayer campaign, and it's an involving, dynamic, astonishing-looking 12-15 hour bloodbath. A good, old-fashioned bloodbath. [Dec 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a sequel, it's not so much an extension as a remix, but one so capable and confident that 'remix' could very well be one of Clover Studio's own personal VFX powers.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The control system deserves special mention, as it could so easily have been crude or overwhelming. Instead, it's sophisticated and sensitive, catering solidly enough for corridor-cleaning run'n'guns while allowing ambitious flights of TK fancy. [Aug 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A debut of rare success in the genre: one at once fresh yet familiar, both visually arresting and mechanically enticing. [Apr 2010, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Double Fine’s adventure is confident and charming, the studio feeling its way to a comfortable mid-point between the desires of adventure-game fans and its own motivation to move the genre forward – even if only by a small increment.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its flaws are downplayed in the context of its range, its humour, its oddities, and its alternately psychopathic and pandering NPCs. It's as unusual as it is conventional. [Nov 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is melee done right, set in an astonishing world, brimming with imagination. [July 2009, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jokes are in short supply, as is the serene abstraction often associated with modern puzzle games. The platforming segments and spaced-out checkpoints might annoy the more cerebrally focused, but all told they're a fairly minor part of the game.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that's no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the streamlined and brisk approach that brushes over some of the minutiae of the previous games might cause some PC fans to baulk, Revolution has concentrated rather than diluted the Civ experience, creating an expression of the concept that's perfectly suited to its platform. [July 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's never stronger than in its opening hours, and if it never quite recaptures that first heady whiff of discovery, it at least keeps you on the edge of your seat thanks to its punishing design, the stakes rising in tandem with your achievements.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Racers has an appealing lack of pretension that suggests it has nothing to prove other than that Ridge Racer is a delight to play. And it is, with no call for caveat – for a handheld, for a ‘remake’, for a launch title. It's simply one of the best pure arcade racers to date. [JPN Import; Feb 2005, p.68]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s scope to build everything from a two-hour co-op dungeon crawl to a 100-hour purple-prosed epic. It’s that breadth that makes NN2 as much of an essential purchase as genre fans could ask for. [Christmas 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Above all, it's funny...If anything, this is the most bizarre game in the series to date. [Jan 2007, p.72]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One thing’s for sure: it’s the one we’ve been waiting to play.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game’s depth is matched by a generous breadth of modes and options.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite being all about the numbers, FM2010 rises above them to be unexpectedly cruel, kind, and even visceral at times. [Christmas 2009, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is, of course, more of the same, but the concept is as compulsive as ever. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Guwange appears the most accessible of Cave's late-90s output, even if the latter stages of the game, particularly in the two extra modes featured in this update, will require a combination of dedicated practice and natural skill to overcome. [Oct 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not be the game of stealth the blueprints and lingo of red exclamation marks suggest, but Monaco’s loot and scoot play has a winning personality that’s all its own.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The major strengths of the original title remain undimmed; this is as consumate an example of Koei's design skill as its predecessor and every bit as enjoyable - in spite of having seen it all before. [Dec 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's another shining example of a European developer handling Japanese IP with care, remixing and refreshing the genres Japan's native developers often struggle to enhance and honour.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As we wait for the first of the promised updates, then, there's plenty of reason to hope that this is the beginning, after all –the beginning of something rather special.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The only sour note is the way the game keeps even the most skilled players at a severe leaderboard disadvantage until they've unlocked – or purchased – the final playable character.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Suddenly the nonsense global scoreboards of Xbox Live and PSN, designed no doubt to validate those services with the suggestion of mass involvement, are exposed as being badly hampered by their own ambition. United’s tight-knit communities are a welcoming, sensible and above all enjoyable blueprint for the way things should be. [Apr 2007, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that’s no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine