Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,542 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Grand Theft Auto IV
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,542 game reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's another shining example of a European developer handling Japanese IP with care, remixing and refreshing the genres Japan's native developers often struggle to enhance and honour.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Warp tends to the lightweight - almost a confection - but as with anything that offers this sort of energetic sugary high, sometimes it's good to be left wanting more.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The series' daily challenges return, and the team's flair for simple, yet interesting, map design remains undiminished. Refinement's never quite as exciting as reinvention, of course, but with so little to fix, Rodeo's clearly spent its development time rather wisely.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Splatters ultimately feels as much like the heir to Trials HD as to Rovio's feathery world-beater. Maybe it belongs on XBLA after all.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a dazzling seamlessness to every aspect of Prototype 2. You feel it as you traverse the world, sprinting powerfully up buildings, bounding high into the air just as you reach the lip of the roof and then transitioning with a tap of the right trigger into a glide that will take you to the next rooftop.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bolstered by solid voice work and elegantly stylised art, this has an uncommon level of polish for a iOS title, while its ten-hour runtime justifies the premium price tag.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ronimo has made an ingenious Trojan horse by delivering the structure and systems of a cult PC genre on consoles, wrapped in the glamour of classic console gaming. Rather than alienate the wrong audience, Awesomenauts could – and should – make plenty of converts to its cause.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Spellsword's enemies are disappointingly generic, there's a tactile joy in dispatching them: slimes and bats explode messily as blasts of wind launch them into walls, and it's possible to enjoy a brief game of swingball with the laser-shooting eyes that dangle elastically from the ceiling.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Future Soldier exemplifies a developer honouring the 'fun first' ethos of its publisher's canon, even as it stays true to the seriousness of its espionage licence. Yes, it's lost some tactical edge, but a disciplined commitment to entertainment focuses the experience. In the overmasculine world of the thirdperson shooter, this is a game that stands out for being delicately beautiful even as it delivers brutal thrills.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game's angled view and coloured stacks mean that some of the best moments – cascading chains that ripple outwards as the landscape collapses in a shower of points – can sometimes be the result of luck instead of judgement.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Showdown is not just a party game, nor is it the limp refurb you might expect this late in a console life cycle. It feels like something as crucial to Codemasters Racing as any of its predecessors – less a spin-off than a deliberate change of tack.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    And though a clutch of score-based challenges are both too few and too brisk, they contribute to an iOS game of rare generosity and substance.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a game confident enough in its core ideas to simply offer greater volume and variety of enemies in its later stages, and it has the balance and poise to ensure that's more than sufficient.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The shift from WiiWare to 3DS, meanwhile, may not see Art Of Balance really benefiting very much from either the handheld's touchscreen or the developer's range of depth tricks, but it does add a generous suite of new levels - and it does raise the chances of a larger audience finally discovering this playful, wonderfully-calibrated puzzler.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gravity Rush might not always live up to the promise of its tutorial, but it's exactly the kind of original game that a fresh-faced system such as Vita needs, taking subtle, thoughtful advantage of its control inputs while showcasing its power.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a game that lives well within your comfort zone no matter how many bullets are flying, and how many enemies are kiting along behind you. It's a game about games, in other words – and a very good one, at that.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Above all else, it's an infectiously cheery game that marches to a very different tempo. In that respect, Beat The Beat might just be the perfect swansong for Wii.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The frame-rate occasionally chugs, but little else can truly hold Mr. Dreamer back. This is a confident twist on a popular genre, and a case study in how a good idea needs little embellishment.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So while the campaign's filled with visual pleasures and colourful tricks, it's in the stark white spaces of the editor that Sound Shapes really dazzles, stepping away from the museum of hallucinations that all rhythm action games offer and threatening, at times, to become a genuine musical instrument in its own right.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a smart iOS game that reduces a sport to its basic elements like this - and an even smarter one that can then turn those elements into something that feels entirely new. Three points.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It remains disarmingly single-minded throughout, yet any repetition is offset by intuitive, precise controls, and satisfying audiovisual feedback.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throw in a typically generous range of levels and a surprisingly engrossing hidden object game, and Snapshot becomes a recipe for a candy-coloured afternoon of elegant brainteasers.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Klei's Saturday morning cartoon style visuals intersect smoothly with your ninja's slinky animation and flowing moves, and the range of visual effects (position-betraying lightning strikes, a blurred fog of war-style filter on activity beyond your sight line) folds neatly back into the game's light-and-shadow based stealth systems. The result is a slick and striking game, one with presentation worthy of the potent and flexible set of powers at its core.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The true measure of this journey isn't where you end up, it's how fast your pulse is racing when each luminous tube finally spits you out into the darkness again. [Oct 2012, p.92]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In spite of its balance wobbles, Orcs Must Die 2 is a frenetic blast of co-op joy - the ideal 30-minute post-pint pick-me-up, be it a step-change sequel or not. [Oct 2012, p.106]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether you're serious about climbing the leaderboards or just looking to race a teetering cupcake monster around on a pushbike, Hello Games' victory lap has you covered. May the instant restarts never falter. May the boosting never cease.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Guild Wars 2 is a few brushstrokes short of a masterpiece, then, but ArenaNet has succeeded in trying to paint over the worst of the genre's cracks. Thanks to a rigorous programme of restoration, only sometimes do its underlying imperfections show through the glossy veneer.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Smilebit, led by Masayoshi Kikuchi – who has since moved on to work on the Yakuza series, another franchise that pivots around vivid city-building – swam upstream with JSR, defying the rush to photorealism, celebrating rebellion and individuality in one of the most memorable genre mash-ups you're ever likely to come across. Its HD revival is every inch that game, serving as a reminder that originality and passion retain their lustre when all else fades, and that such treasures are worth buffing up to display again.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The levels here are every bit as inventive as they were in Origins and, by the time your moveset has expanded to include a hover, wall-run and punch, every bit as punishing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As the studio name suggests, this is a game design team that's in love with books, and so it's amongst books that its first offering reveals its true potential.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What Fireproof has done, in other words, is to literally wrap the mechanics of a point and click adventure, with its abstract puzzles and occasionally opaque logic, around these fantastical contraptions, before suffusing the experience with an air of ghostly mystery.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It makes no spectacular breaks from the past, but it does reclaim the mood – if not the tone – of Diablo II. It's living proof that the values of 2001 still have worth over a decade later.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jokes are in short supply, as is the serene abstraction often associated with modern puzzle games. The platforming segments and spaced-out checkpoints might annoy the more cerebrally focused, but all told they're a fairly minor part of the game.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hell Yeah! may wear its warm immaturity on its sleeve, but its jokes are strong, its protagonist and antagonists likeable and its rhythms satisfying.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Previous Forza entries showed glimmers of personality, hinting at a broader approach to accessibility, but were too shy and reserved to truly let loose. Horizon boldly goes there. It's a magpie game, assembled from pieces of other series, but it delivers a driving game precision engineered to offer all levels of player the best possible experience.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This sense of restrictiveness filters through to ACIII's mission design. There are surprisingly few assassinations here, and relatively little freedom to plan an approach to them. It's mostly eavesdropping, tailing, chase sequences and battle scenes.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Punch Quest isn't just good for a free-to-play game. It's good, full stop, infused with humour, depth and the most charming violence imaginable. Unless you're a skeleton knight, in which case the violence is offensive, troubling and needlessly graphic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At the core remains the solid, steady hand of Halo, but those hoping Halo 4 would roll back Reach's intricacies and deliver an alternative to the current wave of console shooters will be disappointed.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Backed by Activision's fantastic investment and support, Treyarch has succeeded, and made a sort of ultimate current-gen Call Of Duty. Not a reinvention – that, hopefully, comes next year, on box-fresh hardware and a new engine – but a refinement of the most successful series of its generation. Black Ops II is an excellent Call Of Duty game, then, but it's only a Call Of Duty game, with all that implies.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beyond the obvious aesthetic appeal of the jump to HD, New Super Mario Bros U doesn't make a particularly convincing case for Nintendo's new console, and there's very little here that couldn't have been done on Wii. But if it isn't a great showpiece for the console, it may have to settle for being a very good Mario game, perhaps the finest of the plumber's side-scrolling adventures since his 16bit heyday.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Far Cry 3's main missions are nothing special in and of themselves, and include one or two exhausting slogs and limp stealth sections, but the campaign does a better job than Far Cry 2's storyline when it comes to providing an alternative to the open emergence of the player-authored escapades.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Intelligent Systems takes great care to shape its RPG for portable play. The world is divided into Super Mario Bros-style levels that each pack a tidy little narrative. Levelling is removed in order to keep these vignettes grind-free. And it's all wrapped up in Nintendo's typically hilarious localisation.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are small gripes – having to use an undo button rather than pick tiles back off the grid irks in 'standard' scenarios, for instance – but they slowly melt away in the face of such eclectic gameplay. Seating arrangements have rarely felt so intelligent, knowing, or inventive.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yes, QatQi is a roguelike with words, and by the time it dawns, this ferociously smart game will have you hooked.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a masterfully constructed piece of tabletop theatre, whose spell is only broken once, as we were delayed for over an hour by some key loot that took over a dozen attempts to drop. Many won't make it past this preposterous roadblock, but those who persevere to the bitter end will be heartily glad they did.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Captivating, strategic and, despite the monstrous aliens, oddly welcoming. [Jan 2013, p.102]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the best entry in its genre since Bayonetta, and might just be the best game Ninja Theory has made to date.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The only sour note is the way the game keeps even the most skilled players at a severe leaderboard disadvantage until they've unlocked – or purchased – the final playable character.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For the moment, though, SOE's MMOG is a remarkable achievement. Games like it often have to sacrifice visual fidelity for performance, but PlanetSide 2 looks stunning, even on medium settings.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Level-5 and Studio Ghibli's contributions are harmonious. As a game, Ni No Kuni builds upon classic JRPG foundations, eschewing the evolutions of Xenoblade Chronicles and Final Fantasy XII. But the assured flair with which Level-5 has implemented each of the game's classic components combines with Ghibli's masterful storytelling to deliver a JRPG that's quite unlike any other.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Temple Run 2 is a beautiful looking, natural extension of the series that never breaks stride for a second. The game's only liability is that, as beautiful as its environments may be, their unceasing repetition can eventually grow wearisome. Like a child hearing about the concept of living in heaven for eternity and asking, won't I get bored?
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This series offered some of the most memorable hours we spent holding a gamepad during 2012. [Feb 2013, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a defined beginning, four distinct seasonal environments and an affecting, surprising conclusion, there's no question that Proteus is a game. But if there's one concern, it's whether this is an island that's worth revisiting once you've seen all it has to offer. In a way, its lack of progression – the absence of skill trees, difficulty levels and save points – works in its favour; you won't dive back in to mop up the last few achievements, or to climb leaderboards, but simply because you want to play Proteus.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a game for those who grew up in Hyrule but spent more time in Lordran in recent years. Some finicky platforming also frustrates, but then Link didn’t get an auto-jump until Ocarina Of Time.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This first segment is potent. [March 2013, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether she’s huddled up against the cold or sending five men to their doom with an explosive arrow, this is still Lara Croft, one of gaming’s most distinctive heroes – and now she has a personality that extends far beyond the bounds of her bra straps. If the purpose of a reboot is to redefine a character and set them up for the future, then this is a job well done.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s ostensibly an action game, but much more slowly paced than that term would suggest. It’s not quite an RPG either, although there’s levelling and grinding involved. And while its world isn’t open – each area is segmented into numbered zones – it’s a sandbox game in every other respect. Guild quests offer a skeletal structure, but there’s no pressure to stick to it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the twitchy combat and compulsive collecting, it all comes back to those creaking mansions. Highly polished under their grime and cobwebs, the treats awaiting in their dark rooms prove Luigi’s subversive series still has the capacity to thrill.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Only its brevity and the limited multiplayer modes keep Judgment firmly in the ‘not a real sequel’ world, but it’s a template for the next generation of Gears and a licence to experiment with the series’ most sacred mechanics.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s refreshingly exacting about timing, though too forgiving when it comes to grading – you can miss several prompts, take plenty of damage and still earn gold.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bright, colourful and mostly dismissive of current trends, it’s clear The Behemoth wants to delight players with every moment of its latest performance. That it succeeds in only most of those moments is still a remarkable achievement.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not take the genre into uncharted waters, and occasionally stumbles into cliche, but Gemini Rue is an accomplished homage that rivals the very titles that influenced it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not be the game of stealth the blueprints and lingo of red exclamation marks suggest, but Monaco’s loot and scoot play has a winning personality that’s all its own.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This welcome focus on spectacle – and the highly recognisable cast – makes Injustice more accessible than most modern fighting games, but there’s plenty to appeal to seasoned players.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Few games are as initially opaque as Starseed Pilgrim, and few offer as rich a dawning sense of discovery in return.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those expecting a tale on par with Atlus’ remarkable RPG may be disappointed, then, but Persona 4 Arena’s thoughtfully designed combat system has been well worth the wait.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Last Light’s pacing – switching as it does between tight tunnels and wide-open abandoned spaces, explosive gunfights and creeping horror, stealth and socialising – could have felt disconnected in the hands of a less-talented developer. Instead it lends its world uncommon depth. The trade-off for a distinctive personality, of course, is that Last Light is occasionally unyielding, but the desire to see what waits in its next tunnel remains a powerful draw throughout.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Schlocky and silly in places, but potent and reflective in others, Nilin’s tale has bags of heart to play off against its flamboyant bosses and existential quandaries, all grounded by a charismatic female star. While the world building isn’t on a par with the best – hampered by a civilian population as robotic as its metal cohorts – a rich backstory and architectural detail make Neo-Paris a place worth visiting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even in its current form, there’s a wealth of ideas and a set of powers that few games twice this length manage to pack in.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This core loop of planning and upgrading defences while plugging the gaps in your frontline is enriched by art that imbues surprising amounts of character into your microscopic soldiers, and sound design that turns the clash of swords and crackling fizz of magic spells into a compulsive symphony.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Coming from the studio behind Wave Trip and Bad Hotel, Gentlemen’s sharp, stylish menus and app icon were always a given, but a conceptual curveball like this was hardly guaranteed to hit its target. That it does so emphatically is convincing proof that this Edinburgh studio is no one-trick pony.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Familiarity is both the worst and best thing about Pikmin 3. Twelve years after the original and nine after the sequel, little has changed – but little really needed to. It may not sell systems on its own, but it’s a fine addition to a sparse software library that brings one of Nintendo’s most vibrantly characterful series into the HD era and, critically, makes convincing use of the GamePad.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rogue Legacy offers the silly, slapstick cruelty of the best roguelikes, but twins it with something just as appealing: a tantalising hint of control over your fate.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Compulsive and beautifully tuned, Pivvot is a tense, nervy challenge to relish.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One thing’s for sure: it’s the one we’ve been waiting to play.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Race The Sun’s tracks remain as consistently well-paced and tiered as the raft of stages we’ve experienced to date, then it can be considered a success rather than an experiment: a confident genre hybrid worthy of your time and patience because who knows, today could be your day.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s perhaps easier to admire than to enjoy, but those who are prepared to meet its bracing challenge may find themselves hooked by one of the smartest iOS games in some time.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a clutch of intricate puzzle stages and some tough daily challenges for players chasing mastery, Ookibloks challenges mind and thumbs in equal measure.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the games’ improved communication features, too, X and Y are truer to their narrative’s ethos: the joy of sharing moments of beauty and surprise with others. It’s a delightful message to send to a new generation of players, many of whom are just starting out on their own gaming journey.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Make no mistake: this is a pair of games that will lead to formative moments in young lives, moments of the kind that will inspire a lifelong passion for the medium.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a game that takes its fantasy as seriously as it needs to be, which is to say both lightly and with rigour in homage to the communal games that make up videogames’ heritage. But it’s also a real original.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    140
    140 is a magnetically moreish experience: delicately balanced and well thought-out. If this is what the programmer can achieve during the downtime from his day job, Playdead’s enigmatic second project can’t come soon enough.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nintendo’s nervousness around punishment, for fear of putting off newcomers, continues to undermine ALBW’s attempts at novelty.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dead Rising 3 is a sandbox in the purest sense, one that urges you to experiment with its innumerable toys at your leisure. The result is an open world that, in spite of its reanimated inhabitants, feels more alive than most.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s gorgeous; Resogun draws on its host hardware’s graphical capabilities to make you feel like the most powerful entity in the room.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a game that skilfully blends the safe with the courageous in an alchemical fusion of old and new, somehow brave and default all at once.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Playing Blek is pure intuition, not a puzzler so much as an act of freeform creation. That’s quite a feat within a genre which can feel so stiff and prescribed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Novelist, then, is a game of endless compromise, and in that sense it is a quite remarkable simulation of family life.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a masterclass of design purity: every one of these elements exists for a reason, and its potential is exploited to the fullest. But Samurai Gunn’s genius lies in its dizzying speed. It condenses organic, balletic setpieces worthy of an action flick finale into mere seconds, the ground filling up with the bloodied pixel remains of the fallen.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s no accident that your role can often feel more captive than intrepid explorer; Fireproof skilfully demonstrates that escapism through escapology can be a potent conceit indeed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Double Fine’s adventure is confident and charming, the studio feeling its way to a comfortable mid-point between the desires of adventure-game fans and its own motivation to move the genre forward – even if only by a small increment.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's never stronger than in its opening hours, and if it never quite recaptures that first heady whiff of discovery, it at least keeps you on the edge of your seat thanks to its punishing design, the stakes rising in tandem with your achievements.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pulling off tricks in OlliOlli – each precision twist, rotation and flick of the Vita’s left analogue stick – feels as satisfying for your fingers to negotiate as any fighting game finishing move. So even if you’re terrible at the game, even if you can’t land a single trick or grind, even if your scores barely creep into triple digits, your avatar’s tumbling faceplant will still imprint the outline of a grinning mouth in the pavement.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The only occasionally clumsy element in Surge Deluxe’s otherwise efficiently streamlined processes is you – or, rather, your big fat finger. Tracing lines between blocks obscures the screen, which can make quick, precise movements difficult, especially between narrow gaps.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Threes is uncommonly sweet, though it can feel a little insubstantial.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bold and distinctive. [March 2014, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So, yes, their irreverent take on the medium may have a few technical shortcomings, but you’ll usually be grinning far too much to care.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s surprisingly tactical.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a thoroughly successful evolution of the twitch shooter, broadening its scope both upwards and outwards as well as expanding its toolset.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This may be the age of the single-screen brawler, but TowerFall is among the most feature-rich of its kind.