Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,568 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 LittleBigPlanet
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,568 game reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s surprisingly tactical.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a thoroughly successful evolution of the twitch shooter, broadening its scope both upwards and outwards as well as expanding its toolset.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This may be the age of the single-screen brawler, but TowerFall is among the most feature-rich of its kind.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As an enigmatic whisper of a narrative concludes in delightful, uplifting fashion, you’ll likely be left wanting more.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While it attempts to blend FMX, quad bikes and more familiar Trials action, the new elements sit uneasily with the old. Trials has always been about precision and skill, traits that are blunted or obfuscated by four-wheel drive and fussy inputs.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It can be too obtuse at times, but the rewards are quite unlike anything else in games: the music peaks, a laser beam rockets off into the sky, and you turn, heading off after that distant synth, in search of your next project deeper in the neon unknown.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a game, it has problems. Indoor spaces will struggle to contain more than a few players (the maximum is seven) and with no rules governing conduct, smaller players are at a natural disadvantage if competition escalates. Still, as a statement of intent it is extraordinary, and feels characteristic of what Sportsfriends sets out to achieve – a realisation that simplicity and good company are the root ingredients of enjoying games, and that far from being decisive, visual sophistication might actually be entirely irrelevant.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Come to terms with its idiosyncrasies and you’ll find a unique and wonderfully characterful action game; it’s well worth suffering those early scratches for the moments where it really begins to purr.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Super Time Force hands you a super weapon that feels super – one that gives you the impression you’ve hacked into the game’s code to gain the upper hand – and then dares you to try to break the game with it. That it never buckles, despite allowing you to continually rewrite history as a horde of player characters and hundreds of projectiles fill the screen, is nothing short of remarkable.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s all a bit of a muddle, suggesting an unwarranted lack of confidence in the core systems, and at times the most keenly anticipated game of this new generation leans too heavily on the conventions of the past.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The New Order is, above all, brave. Its odd mix of ’90s-style FPS excess and Nazi atrocities could have come across as outdated and crass. But MachineGames maintains just as much respect for its difficult subject matter as it does for its players, and the result is a game that indulges the mature and juvenile parts of your personality in equal measure.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For your money, however, this is the best new MMOG since Guild Wars 2 and arguably the most feature complete an MMOG has ever been on launch.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s the combination of this collective roleplay with direct competition that makes the game so compulsive. As such, Blade Symphony is as close as you are likely to get to the fantasy of slowly becoming a master swordsman.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A colourfully written and often funny game, but one that doesn't deviate much from the fantasy rulebook, an area where a more substantial break from the past would have been welcome. [Sept 2014, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A love letter to the NES era, Shovel Knight is punishingly difficult, a game of quick reflexes and exacting precision. [Sept 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a whiff of trial and error at times, but no puzzle's Eureka moment comes by accident. [Sept 2014, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unlike the creature at its centre, Isolation isn't structurally perfect, but it is brilliantly hostile in a way that's likely to shock many players. [Dec 2014, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What is most amazing of all is that despite its litany of weird little problems, Destiny is fantastic, its combat up there with the very best, the thrilling rhythm of its battles still not fading the 30th time through, and it has no single systemic problem that is not fixable. [Dec 2014, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A classy, inventive adventure with an absorbing story. [Dec 2014, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Irritations never last long in Smash 3DS, sandblasted away by the winningly varied combat and the sheer torrent of ways to enjoy it. [Dec 2014, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Advanced Warfare is still Call of Duty, but it's more playful, knowing and refreshing than COD's been in years. [Christmas 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Allow the mood to feel its way into you and the sticky combat and occasional something's-missing-don't-know-what confusion become part of the experience. [June 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Apart from minor graphical tweaks and two fresh characters, VF4E remains much the same game. [May 2003, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's not as much depth as Tetris or Puyo Puyo, but there's not much that disappoints about Bombastic apart from a rather lacklustre platform game that's been bolted on. The deeply involving puzzle mechanics brilliantly build on the foundations laid down by Devil Dice. [Christmas 2003, p.124]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The extreme volatility of every moment carries a reward that overshadows the annoyances. [June 2005, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As a place, Los Angeles simply isn't as much fun as Liberty or Vice. Too much of this silicon LA exists simply because the designers wanted to show that it could be done rather than because it serves any gameplay purpose. [Christmas 2003, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    We need more games like this - ones that are confident and individual - but we need them to be less roughly hewn. The core of the game is solid, but the way it's applied throughout the levels just isn't interesting enough. [Mar 2004, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Gran Turismo 4 is fundamentally unconcerned with furthering the art of the videogame. This titanic franchise, this critical, load-bearing pillar of PlayStation, is barely even a videogame at all. It’s a hobbyist software suite, a racetrack tutorial, an encyclopaedia you can get in and drive off. [March 2005, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Undersized and profoundly linear, but that cannot shake its solidity and the sheer intensity of the spectacle it creates. The most fun thing you'll get on the PC this side of Christmas. [Christmas 2003, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    SimCity 4 might sit down among the many footnotes in the history of gaming, but it fills its remit with skill, creating a game that genuinely demands something of our oft-neglected intellect. [March 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An efficient and well thought out expansion. Short, tight and intense, it's a considerably different experience from Medieval proper and well worth experiencing. [June 2003, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's an 'experience' as much as a game, meaning that it will leave as many people cold as it grabs by the right half of the brain. Beyond good, then, but not quite excellent. [Christmas 2003, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's an 'experience' as much as a game, meaning that it will leave as many people cold as it grabs by the right half of the brain. Beyond good, then, but not quite excellent. [Christmas 2003, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Seeing the game from beginning to end reveals its true artistic merit: it never gets stale; every episode has been drawn with minute care and attention. It would have been an incredible achievement if the gameplay had matched the outstanding art direction. [Dec 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Seeing the game from beginning to end reveals its true artistic merit: it never gets stale; every episode has been drawn with minute care and attention. It would have been an incredible achievement if the gameplay had matched the outstanding art direction. [Dec 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's in traditional multiplayer (and to some degree singleplayer) where the game shines and attains that perfect shallowness of being both addictive and immediately forgettable - until the next go. [Apr 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Over-familiarity and stagnation has bred a cancerous apathy among gaming's cognoscenti. FFX-2, like it or not, gives players a reason to take notice again. [Jan 2004, p.98]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Invisible War is a very fine game spread too thin. It's a game that's made the effort to name the cat in the secretary's desk photo but not to make jumping work properly, that bothers to script loving exchanges between insignificant NPCs but pits you against clumsy and stuttering AI. [Feb 2004, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Yes it is almost the same, but when it's brilliant fun, and no other publisher is releasing games like this, who cares? [June 2003, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If Desert Storm 2 has one flaw, it's that there are only ten maps and these usually channel the player down avenues rather than provide ample playgrounds for strategic experimentation. [Nov 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If Desert Storm 2 has one flaw, it's that there are only ten maps and these usually channel the player down avenues rather than provide ample playgrounds for strategic experimentation. [Nov 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The antithesis of the arcade fix and, despite the fact that this stance is unfashionable at the moment, comes highly recommended, not least because it offers a different view of gaming's future. [May 2003, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite what Naughty Dog's crack programmers might think, you can't encode fun-ness into a videogame. Yes, there's lots of 'fun' to be had here, but is it really more fun than the original? Probably not. [Nov 2003, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A victim of its own success. By creating a story and an atmosphere so far in advance of what we have come to expect from a videogame, it throws harsh light on the conventions we accept without question in lesser titles. It maps out just how far there is to go in marrying sophisticated narrative and meaningful interactivity. [Feb 2004, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Magic Pengel isn't, by any stretch of the imagination, a rounded and satisfying videogame. But it is, without question, a rounded and satisfying stretch of the imagination. [Nov 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A limited, but well-honed, experience. There's craft evident everywhere, from the stylised environments and the vibrant characterisation to the well-rounded storyline. A beautiful, enchanting and unusual game. [March 2003, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you can stomach the precarious ethical nature of a game that takes American intervention in the very serious political quagmire that is Somalia as its subject matter, then this game makes for a varied and engrossing piece of gun-action. [May 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The open levels are fantastic and are complemented by a great storyline with dialogue that's immediately engaging, yet Tribes can feel slightly primitive and the indoor missions are a letdown.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What was once a pleasing console compromise now seems overly restrictive post-"Knights of the Old Republic." Despite hints of moral choices and a dusting of side-quests, it soon boils down to a straight slog, mashing the 'A' button as you wander through prettily rendered - if largely linear - dungeons. [Feb 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Such bastard generic cross-pollination will be of keen interest to those who have pigeonholed the console RPG as yesterday's bread, as Dragon Quarter variously suceeds in its misfit marriage. [June 2003, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ratchet & Clank 2 shows all the signs of a game that's been focus tested to death; at no point will you have to repeat a section more than three times. It's a frustration free journey but sometimes feels anodyne. [Dec 2003, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beautifully detailed with impressive lighting, accurately modelled protagonists and a terrific sense of speed. A refreshing and captivating direction for the series. [Christmas 2003, p.115]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beautifully detailed with impressive lighting, accurately modelled protagonists and a terrific sense of speed. A refreshing and captivating direction for the series. [Christmas 2003, p.115]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You come to Virtual-On to beat up big robots through a mix of opportune tactics and instinctive brawn, and throughout Marz the precise and articulated combat remains as demanding as ever. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Singleplayer is weak - despite well-worked tutorial and mission modes it always feels like target practice for combat with friends - and the lack of online support disappoints. But despite a potentially hazardous dimensional switch, it remains as appealing a way of antagonising your friends as ever. [Dec 2003, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Singleplayer is weak - despite well-worked tutorial and mission modes it always feels like target practice for combat with friends - and the lack of online support disappoints. But despite a potentially hazardous dimensional switch, it remains as appealing a way of antagonising your friends as ever. [Dec 2003, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As an RTS, Black & White 2 is less deep, but just as flexible and responsive – and when creatures, miracles, wonders and large armies are all in play it’s arguably the greatest show in gaming. [Nov 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Siren's grand ideas are to be applauded, but savouring them takes effort. If you can invest the time, and look away in all the right places - such as the genre's trademarks of outrageously bad combat and dogsbody objectives - then there's a uniquely suffocating horror experience waiting to be survived. [Mar 2004, p.99]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's impossible for your heart not to race as you sweat out the fright of its peerless audio design, chattering voices and muffled sobs endlessly scraping at your senses. [Oct 2004, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The picaresque form allows the levels to function as discreet puzzles rather than as parts of a story arc: the objective remains pure and always the same. The obstacles and methods open to you are what change, and it's in these areas that Contracts has both expanded and improved. [June 2004, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The picaresque form allows the levels to function as discreet puzzles rather than as parts of a story arc: the objective remains pure and always the same. The obstacles and methods open to you are what change, and it's in these areas that Contracts has both expanded and improved. [June 2004, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Groove works you harder than lots of rhythm action games, although that's often because players will find themselves waving unnecessarily, unsure whether their hits are going to register. This is where the game suffers most: It lacks the tactile response of its peers. [Jan 2004, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Right now, the online exchange that Trackmania needs doesn't exist, but the community is growing by word of mouth. This is clever gaming, and in six months time it could be enormous. [Feb 2004, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Deformable landscapes, multiple level routes, context sensitive controls, impeccable camera control, inventive boss level. Flipnic would be one hell of an adventure game. [Dec 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    That this is one decidedly average experience and one decidedly great one jammed together becomes clear long before you’re freed to fully enjoy yourself. [Jan 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Series veterans may find there's no individual mission that can compare to past highlights like the nails-down-a-blackboard dread of Return To The Cathedral or the emergent possibilities of Life Of The Party, but they remain admirably clever pieces of level design. [July 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As a reinvention it's a resounding success, and there are no pretenders to its comprehensiveness [May 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's easy to forget just how precious few of the genre's many exponents ever attain this level of competence, of course, but that said it's not unreasonable to have hoped for a little more innovation from Capcom. [July 2004, p.103]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's almost as if Capcom has distilled its Onimusha series, extracting the two core components of the franchise ' epic, fierce confrontations, and puzzle-pocked exploration of lavish settings ' and given each more room to breathe, with their own character, style, atmosphere and pace... Fresher, but not better. [Jan 2005, p.82]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ultimately, setting out to critique and parody so studiously such a hidebound genre has brought The Bard’s Tale too close to what it was trying to distance itself from. This is a conventional, likeable dungeon crawl whose flashes of brilliance distract you from its accomplishments by hinting at how much more it could have been. [Christmas 2004, p.93]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's all about flamboyance, stylish swordplay against clusters of spawning enemies. Anyone expecting more than the chance to concoct dazzling high-score strategies will find it a flat and empty experience, though. [Mar 2004, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While there are awkward moments on this malignant management escapade, it’s never less than charming. The exaggerated ‘60’s spy-movie design is familiar and entertainingly fresh, and although flawed, it’s still far more appealing than Republic. [Nov 2004, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While there isn't the sense of playing something that opens up a new era for a genre long written off as dying, there is a simple freshness and a delightful accessibility which might endear it to an even wider market. [July 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you share director Ragnar Tornquist's view that being engaged in dialogue is a form of gameplay, then there's a richness here that few other titles have the ability or luxury to create. [June 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Next Encounter is one of the grandest and busiest console battlefields yet created. This is a spiritual update to Space Invaders, a one-trick pony that kicks harder than most FPS thoroughbreds, making the "Medal of Honour" series seem like a vain diva by comparison. [June 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The strongest MMO launch for a long while, and the genre’s deftest ever take on PVP – but its appeal may yet prove too narrow. [Christmas 2008, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With the FPS realm being crushingly overpopulated, and its upper class becoming so terrifyingly demanding and particular, Pariah’s solidity isn’t enough to allow it entry into the genre’s gentry. [June 2005, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ignore the presentation, the much-talked-about comic book inspiration. Ignore the artwork, the ridiculous voiceovers and the magnificent origin stories. Pay it no attention. The really funny thing about Freedom Force is how little the funny stuff matters. [May 2005, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An incredibly solid universe with barely a technical glitch to be found, but it’s soulless and almost bereft of plot or character. This is a sandbox game that’s begging for a purpose. [March 2005, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Unsung War doesn’t break any boundaries, but it perfectly fulfils expectations. What might look unambitious is in actuality an adventure that whisks you through brilliantly rendered backdrops with a touch more polish than previous iterations, always flying hard and successfully conveying the buzz of aerial combat. [Jan 2005, p.90]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s an introspective RPG not just in theme, but in the outlay of time and thought it asks of the player to make sense of what’s otherwise a cosmetically unfair challenge. It’s a work of art, but one on such a dauntingly high pillar that only the most dedicated will appreciate it to the full. [Christmas 2004, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At its best only when the structure is there to support it. Find eight people to play with regularly, and invest in voice communications to streamline tactical discussions, and Guild Wars offers an intelligent and demanding thrill - bringing the best of the skill and strategy of FPS deathmatches to the grandeur of a role-playing world. [Aug 2005, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Plenty of games have flourished around the slaughter, scale and destruction of war, but few have managed to realise a soldier’s role and worth - disposable, vulnerable, pivotal - as well as this. [Apr 2005, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Plenty of games have flourished around the slaughter, scale and destruction of war, but few have managed to realise a soldier’s role and worth - disposable, vulnerable, pivotal - as well as this. [Apr 2005, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The complaints that can be levelled at Superstars are real, but so is the magic it contains. When it works, Monkey Ball truly feels like you’re tilting the land, not moving the ball. When it works, Nights makes you think you can fly. [Dec 2005, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s just no accounting for an excruciating wipeout on the final lap when such possibilities are at the mercy of circumstances as much as they are at the player’s skill. But, played with a graceful, Zen-like acceptance – shit happens – Crash ‘n’ Burn is as enjoyable as it is easy to understand. [Jan 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Nippon Ichi’s disregard for the cult of stagnated updates is at once exhilarating and unnerving. It’s exhilarating because it leaves the player wondering exactly where these craftsmen of the strategy minutiae will go next, and it’s unnerving because Phantom Brave’s reworking is a bridge too far for all but the most dedicated of videogame strategists. [Nov 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ubisoft has taken a flawed game of boundless promise, destroyed some (but not all) of its appeal, fixed some (but not enough) of its problems, and jeopardised the whole endeavour by making the same mistake twice and rushing it to market before it was steady on its feet. Prince of Persia is strong and supple enough to survive this with many of its immense virtues intact. But it deserved so much better. [Christmas 2004, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ubisoft has taken a flawed game of boundless promise, destroyed some (but not all) of its appeal, fixed some (but not enough) of its problems, and jeopardised the whole endeavour by making the same mistake twice and rushing it to market before it was steady on its feet. Prince of Persia is strong and supple enough to survive this with many of its immense virtues intact. But it deserved so much better. [Christmas 2004, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Crisp of cut-scene, blessed with a refreshingly light touch and low-key compared to the po-faced chest-beating of its peers, Second Sight could well be a high water mark in storytelling through games (as opposed to storytelling around them). [Oct 2004, p.104]
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It looks great, and the boosting system means that, as a time-trial game, it's fantastic. If your progress wasn't so easily sabotaged by a thoughtless collision, it would be a fantastic racer, too. [June 2004, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s wildly exhilarating, and it’s wildly exhilarating because it works, but that’s not to say it works perfectly... Persevere to perfect the right lighting conditions and learn the game’s slightly idiosyncratic perception of your movements, and it is an unparalleled experience, if a slightly shallow sports game. [Jan 2005, p.86]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Were it not for the rich, recognisable and beloved settings that fall over themselves to get to the player, this would be a desperately bland game. But the power of those settings simply cannot be brushed aside. [June 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    THUG2’s biggest step forward – it’s stripped-down Classic mode – is one it takes back. It’s as refreshing as it is nostalgic, taking on old-school Tony Hawk’s levels and goals with THUG’s improved trick set, and proves to be a necessary antidote to the mouthy fluster of the career mode, offering up pure, disciplined high-score play against the clock. [Dec 2005, p.117]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a game that’s as riotously entertaining as it is viciously random... It’s gleeful automobile slapstick, but not for anyone who values skill and achievement more than taking a wrecking ball to their opponents’ racing lines. [Dec 2005, p.114]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a game that’s as riotously entertaining as it is viciously random... It’s gleeful automobile slapstick, but not for anyone who values skill and achievement more than taking a wrecking ball to their opponents’ racing lines. [Dec 2005, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Alien Hominid is just about an essential title for anyone who’s caught themselves yearning for a forgotten past, or to any young blood wondering what people mean when they say they don’t make them like they used to. [Jan 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Kids are often underestimated, but that doesn’t mean their games should be. Lego Star Wars has an appeal that goes beyond age, even if it’s one that rarely goes beyond 20 minutes at a time. [May 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Kids are often underestimated, but that doesn’t mean their games should be. Lego Star Wars has an appeal that goes beyond age, even if it’s one that rarely goes beyond 20 minutes at a time. [May 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Snowblind never truly escapes the feeling of being a well-dressed, derivative run’n’gun shooter, it never fails to get the running and gunning right, and in that respect, at least, it’s a sound success. [March 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine