Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,603 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Bayonetta 2
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,603 game reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Its keen sense of drama is as authentic as it is exhilarating: arcing a 40-yard free-kick around the wall and into the top corner in the last-minute of a cup final is as thrilling a moment as you'll witness in any FIFA match. It's hardly the beautiful game – its visuals are perfunctory at best – but Simon Read's creation smartly captures the capitalism, the artistry and the sheer, glorious unpredictability of its subject.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It looks great, and the boosting system means that, as a time-trial game, it's fantastic. If your progress wasn't so easily sabotaged by a thoughtless collision, it would be a fantastic racer, too. [June 2004, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An incredibly solid universe with barely a technical glitch to be found, but it’s soulless and almost bereft of plot or character. This is a sandbox game that’s begging for a purpose. [March 2005, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels more like a yearly update than a sequel, a new campaign with old multiplayer. The game isn't distinct from its predecessors in any important way, and fatigue sets in quicker than before. [Jan 2011, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Zombie Gunship obviously has its influences, but it works them into something surprising: a slow-mo high-score shooter, a grainy panorama of survival horrors, and a greater sense of an undead horde than the rest of the App Store's zombie shooters put together.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's undeniably a one-trick pony, then, but it's a good trick, performed with flair and polish. Those inclined to correct grammatical howlers in friends' Facebook missives will find this a far less confrontational way of sating their inner pedant.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Snowblind never truly escapes the feeling of being a well-dressed, derivative run’n’gun shooter, it never fails to get the running and gunning right, and in that respect, at least, it’s a sound success. [March 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels more like a yearly update than a sequel, a new campaign with old multiplayer. The game isn't distinct from its predecessors in any important way, and fatigue sets in quicker than before. [Jan 2011, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    We hate its impotence, its utter lack of a scare beyond an aversion to getting shot. And with its market-led features and Skinner-box mechanics, we hate that a series that began as a lesson in horror – of the B-movie kind, admittedly – now feels so afraid of the competition.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If Rock of Ages eventually runs out of variety, it never runs out of charm. The game has a magnificent sense of momentum throughout, tugging you downhill towards the enemy's gates and upwards through the strata of Western culture. It is an oddball offering in every sense.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Opoona has enough character that, combined with its innovative combat and leisurely pace through an interesting world, it is comfortably its own experience. [June 2008, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Masterful controls aside, Corruption sees Retro lost for a while, like Samus, down some mystifying and convoluted dead-end of its own making, populating a universe that should have stayed desolate and dead. [Nov 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fast, engrossing and perfectly attuned to the needs of a handheld, Lunar Knights addresses the previous games’ failings without feeling like a retreat, providing refinement without too much dilution. [Apr 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The most satisfying stages give you a generous toolset with which to experiment, but one too many involves painstaking repositioning of a few items.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While you won't necessarily win without some loyal subjects from your friends list, there's a deceptive amount of fun you can have while trying. [Oct 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At the halfway mark, Chains is so tremendous, striking an almost perfect beat of difficulty spikes, weapon upgrades and stupendous visual reveals, that you have to question its endurance. And, sadly, it flounders right on cue. [Apr 2008, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The revelatory finale will leave you winded, but also heartened by Krillbite’s assertion that firstperson horror needn’t be confined by crumbling walls and straitjackets.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As a reinvention it's a resounding success, and there are no pretenders to its comprehensiveness [May 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is restless and, in the context of Clank’s overalls story, incoherent. But it’s also vibrantly diverse. [Sept 2008, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Uprising may not break any new ground in a genre that is arguably an endangered species, but it does a good job of breathing life into the dying breed. It's a reminder that an artist's eye, when met by a designer's understanding of modern tastes, can revitalise a struggling brand and make the old feel new again.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For all its successes, the fact remains that even after significant delays, what's been delivered is far from finished. [Dec 2014, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It only betrays itself completely once – in a dismally conventional boss battle around halfway through – though at times Spartan threatens to become routine, it never does, thanks to its strong character, handsome looks and sheer, irrepressible verve. [Nov 2005, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Maddening moments are far enough between to be only a minor blemish on an otherwise fantastic portable action game. [Jan 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Boss fights aside, Ubosoft's consideration for its subject matter throughout is striking. [Sept 2014, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a shame that Forza's much-vaunted AI tech proves an ill fit for open-world racing. [Dec 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In terms of distilling the core Civilization experience from PC to handheld, this is almost as victorious as the PC-to-console iterations. [Oct 2008, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Core game play remains largely undeveloped from Symphony Of The Night, and, despite the additions, is aspirational rather than inspirational. It’s certainly the best handheld Castlevania game, but Igarashi’s team is too dedicated to the framework he masterminded for this to be anything innovatory. [Nov 2005, p.108]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Blood Money feels only slightly closer to the series’ ideal of a gameworld that’s both complex and cogent, and is more accessible and entertaining with it. [July 2006, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you've come this far on Lee's journey, Around Every Corner's ending will make the final chapter a near essential purchase: not just to see how this supposedly reactive, in part player-authored story ends, but to see if Telltale really can pull it off.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a game that feels like bits of lots of other games you've played before, but not in this order, rarely with such a sure-footed framework and never presented with such a crisp gloss of cartoon-quality presentation; and it's all bunched up together more tightly and enjoyably than in Sly 2. [Dec 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's a great deal of satisfaction in finding the right combination of fighters and feeling the curve of a battle until you hit the tagging sweet spot. [Mar 2011, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While the overall blandness means Galactrix is unlikely to truly thrill many people, it also means that it won’t exclude anyone either, and the ever-reliable pattern-spotting blends with the steady trickle of meaningless rewards to exert a pull on its audience that is truly Pavlovian. [Apr 2009, p.125]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The picaresque form allows the levels to function as discreet puzzles rather than as parts of a story arc: the objective remains pure and always the same. The obstacles and methods open to you are what change, and it's in these areas that Contracts has both expanded and improved. [June 2004, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's an unexpected clarity to solo play that's lost amid the tumult of human competition, but what's never obscured – and what stands as its great accomplishment – is its fond and intricate celebration of all things PlayStation.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    One of the most artistically accomplished games to have emerged from an independent studio, Trine 2 has enough minor tweaks and new things to see to draw you back into its playground. It's a short, sweet, occasionally imperfect little treat.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For all its delightful art and writing, the cold logic in its Gordian design is unrelenting. [Sept 2014, p.115]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Persistent players will find it to be one of the best multiplayer experiences on PSP. [Dec 2007, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With the FPS realm being crushingly overpopulated, and its upper class becoming so terrifyingly demanding and particular, Pariah’s solidity isn’t enough to allow it entry into the genre’s gentry. [June 2005, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The slower, more deliberate pace and the hefty fine levied by missed throws and counters may initially confuse those expecting Guilty Fear in a new set of clothes, but ultimately provides a smoother learning curve and a more welcoming experience for new players. [Sept 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels like one more step in the right direction for Daedalic, then, and while it’s still in dire need of some truly iconic and unforgettable cast members to define and flesh out its solid handle on the genre, Memoria is another worthwhile investment for both developer and player.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a shame that the terrain you wander through as you do all this is so visually substandard. [Dec 2014, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a generous package, and even more so given that a purchase of the Vita version nets you a PS3 copy as well, your progress persistent between the two versions. Other launch games may better sell Vita's touch, tilt or AR capabilities, but there is no better advertisement for its connectivity.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a game built with focus and one that’s going in a truly worthwhile direction, but that falls short of greatness. [Apr 2006, p.7]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In short, it's sweet. [Dec 2014, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's impossible not to feel disappointed with a title that, to judge by it's opening, ought to have competed on an even footing with "Super Mario Sunshine." Instead it's an uneasy compromise between the splendour of the early levels and the inadequacies of later missions. [Dec 2003, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The thrill of the chase is still present, then, even if we've come to expect something a little more subversive from Adult Swim.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The astounding breadth of the missions is enough to distract from finicky systems and low-res textures. [Dec 2014, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It can't have the same gobsmacking impact as its inspiration, but this is a simple, engaging and occasionally baffling journey in its own right, with plenty of hooks to snare the newcomer.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Magicka delivers splashy nonsense of a gleeful kind, and somehow its delight in chaos and willful stupidity buoys it some way above its faults. [Mar 2011, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    More diversion than challenge, and never leads to stress. [Aug 2009, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is still a fine – and visually opulent – auto-runner, but it’s bloated, too; a little restraint would have gone a long way.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Having moved up an entire notch from inaugural title "Racers," the PixelJunk brand is becoming one of PSN's most promising and confident niches. [Mar 2008, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Take it or leave it: just don’t ignore it, or you may miss the videogame equivalent of a daft night out with some of Capcom’s finest minds. [Dec 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It would be a pity if this erratic, wonderfully offbeat adventure ended here. [Dec 2014, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Really, this is a game of strong, simple virtues: knockout action, beautiful character design, lovingly articulated models, crisp sound and overall polish. Every now and then it'll overstretch, at which point it falls. [Jan 2007, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A stern, if unspectacular, challenge. [Jan 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A few interface niggles and the eventual feeling of repetition don’t hold back a creative reimagining of a game type that, thanks to the execution, is as important as it is enjoyable. [Nov 2007, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Compared to its Wii counterpart - as generic a movie-licensed collect 'em up as you'll see - the DS version is swollen with ideas. [Apr 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Our concern is that the game doesn't quite have the depth to sustain interest over a period of months, and an apparent uninterest in providing anything other than straight combat will compound the problem. And yet, at US$9.99, Plain Sight boasts a price that's as minimalist as its visual style. As such, a game this novel can only be a tempting prospect.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There are some gently taxing puzzles here, and just enough variety to keep the game ticking along, but the real surprise is just how winsome Docomodake’s fungi are, each section ending with a guilelessly warm celebration of family values. [Mar 2009, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like Spelunky before it, survival often depends on what you're carrying, and when you happen across life-prolonging shops and lucky weapon drops. But FTL is a less masterful game than Derek Yu's cave diver, throwing more chance into the mix.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s more to be got out of this new kind of play than Nintendo has found this time around, and some of it could be better implemented. But, for now, it offers an experience that can’t be matched. [July 2005, p.89]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It delivers on 5th Cell's unlikely conceit far more capably than expected, and fulfills a blueprint so bizarrely ambitious almost nobody believed it was possible. [Nov 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The sense of immersion is about as unparalleled as you can get without an Oculus Rift strapped to your head. But the campaign feels overlong and stretch marks begin to appear towards the end of the roughly 20-hour adventure. This game could have benefited from some strategic dismemberment of its own, performed by a shrewd editor who knows how to sever redundant limbs.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Apart from minor graphical tweaks and two fresh characters, VF4E remains much the same game. [May 2003, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Seeing the game from beginning to end reveals its true artistic merit: it never gets stale; every episode has been drawn with minute care and attention. It would have been an incredible achievement if the gameplay had matched the outstanding art direction. [Dec 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although the decision to lengthen the already generous cut-scenes may deliver the odd treat for MGS veterans, many will find their duration exasperating. Crucially, though, some of the reworked sequences end up interfering with the game's pacing while failing to bring anything of substance to the experience. [Apr 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a peculiar idea to grasp, but it's impossible to argue with how successfully Game Freak has taken one simple design decision and made it integral to movement, combat and puzzle solving. [Mar 2006, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Could allowing complete freedom to draw support sharply designed puzzles? Mid-way through the completed game’s 80-plus levels, you’ll still be wondering. [Mar 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Unadventurous Everybody's Golf may be, but it's wonderfully executed, and its presence at Vita's launch is welcome. With their endlessly smiling characters, cheery J-tunes and bright skies, Everybody's Golf titles are the best Nintendo-esque games a Sony console has ever seen, and this latest iteration is no exception.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a game that rewards the long-haul with deep, inventive missions which eschew the usual fetch and kill structure, ensuring that the many hours spent in Fallout 3’s wasteland aren’t wasted. [Christmas 2008, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Alan Wake is every bit as compulsive and satisfying as the fiction on which it riffs, but it also runs the risk of being equally forgettable. It’s a game that delivers the requisite number of twists, turns and thrills, but the only real revelations take place on those scattered manuscript pages.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beneath the drab visuals, then, Taito's unlikely classic remains a game of skill and wit, as well as proof that no-frills fun can still be found in the strangest of places.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game’s inimitable character bursts at the seams of what was clearly a limited budget. There is none of SquareSoft’s dull-eyed cinematic waste here, which will no doubt alienate swarms of both genre fans and critics. But the charm of the title coupled with its breathtaking breadth and depth will win over more discerning gamers. [Aug 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Underneath the mundane masculinity and grimy gun-toting clichés lies a heavily structured and well-considered score-attack game – one that’s worth excavating for all the short-lived interest it holds. [Feb 2008, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Europa Universalis IV is the game you graduate to when you’re tired of Civilization. That’s ultimately also why all those numbers are there, beneath the surface: because you never graduate away from Europa Universalis IV. It drops you in the deep end before you’re ready, but if you can swim back towards the shallows during those first five hours, you’ll unlock a game so rich, it’ll be helping you tell stories for years.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As clumsy as some elements feel, it's still difficult to vilify KOTOR II. Its strength is in its ability to make you care about your character's fate, and as an RPG package it's as comprehensive as they come. [Feb 2005, p.70]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For every moment of epiphany, wide-eyed with an awareness of a resolution, there's an equal number of blunderingly hapless wins, falling or jumping accidentally to new and advantageous positions. [June 2008, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This isn’t Far Cry 3 at its best mechanically, but it’s definitely the game at its most charismatic. Because as a bunch of well-worn VHS tapes at Ubisoft Montreal undoubtedly prove, the ’80s knew how to do personality.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fans of the series are in the position of seeing a game that is an enhancement, rather than an exploitation, of its source material – and fans of the FPS have another good example of the genre to add to their busy schedules. [Aug 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a game that’s as riotously entertaining as it is viciously random... It’s gleeful automobile slapstick, but not for anyone who values skill and achievement more than taking a wrecking ball to their opponents’ racing lines. [Dec 2005, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s an enormously likeable package, and one which sets perhaps a much more valuable next-gen agenda: one of games which place a higher emphasis on player enjoyment than they do their own ambitions. [Jan 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game isn’t clear how its surgeries work – which bits need be cut where, and with what tools – not a problem when you’re merrily and messily experimenting, but annoying if you’re keen to progress. Still, few games take that odd, occasional gulf between what you intend to happen and what actually occurs on screen and fill it with such comedy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ingenious, experimental and entirely polarising, games like ColorZ show that WiiWare continues to take the road less travelled. In doing so, the platform’s most poignant offerings reveal something a little bit magical - a fleeting glimpse of the soul lurking within the machine.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The levels can sometimes feel artificial and depopulated, the game neither recreating sprawling, unrelenting conflict, nor managing to suggest a greater world through the controlled cinema of more linear shooters. [Mar 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Series veterans may find there's no individual mission that can compare to past highlights like the nails-down-a-blackboard dread of Return To The Cathedral or the emergent possibilities of Life Of The Party, but they remain admirably clever pieces of level design. [July 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Perhaps, in this fastest of genres, it’s simply six months too late...in a race with "Forza Motorsport 2," "PGR4," "Dirt" and even the likes of "MotoGP '07," there’s the unmistakeable feel that Sega Rally’s been superseded before it leaves the grid. [Nov 2007, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Charming, irrepressible and inventive, the fact that it never manages to blend its ingredients smoothly together doesn’t stop it being a toothsome pick ‘n’ mix of playful puzzles, familiar faces and unrestrained whimsy. [June 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s still a classic, then, but one you’d be wise to play in brief installments. And with no real plot to lose yourself in, no breadcrumbs to follow, and very little else to bother yourself with besides headshots, perhaps this is Serious Sam as he’s always meant to be encountered – as a palate-cleansing blast of pure four-colour chaos to enjoy between other courses.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The picaresque form allows the levels to function as discreet puzzles rather than as parts of a story arc: the objective remains pure and always the same. The obstacles and methods open to you are what change, and it's in these areas that Contracts has both expanded and improved. [June 2004, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Many will be satisfied by the simple existence of a COD game on the day next-gen hardware launches, but this is a missed opportunity nonetheless. The studio that defined the console FPS in the current generation has declined to do the same here. By the time it gets another chance, it may be too late.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Whatever its bias or excisions, MOH rejects the sort of gung-ho globetrotting baloney seen in Modern Warfare, and makes an honest attempt not to trivialise the lives of US soldiers, creating an air of sober authenticity which is unusual among shooters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It would also be an overstatement to call it profound: in any other medium such themes would hardly be revelatory, and although The Line is a thoughtful and well-intentioned game, the level of its writing is carefully engineered to be accessible to those expecting a brainless bullet exchange. Even so, it is brazen in its critique, and a rarity besides. It may not be subtle, but it engages with problems that the bellicose ilk of Modern Warfare and Medal Of Honor have yet to acknowledge.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Perfect? No. Indispensable? Yes. Wii Sports more than earns its bundled place as an essential component of the hardware. [Christmas 2006, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ultimately, setting out to critique and parody so studiously such a hidebound genre has brought The Bard's Tale too close to what it was trying to distance itself from. This is a conventional, likeable dungeon crawl whose flashes of brilliance distract you from its accomplishments by hinting at how much more it could have been. [Christmas 2004, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ubisoft has taken a flawed game of boundless promise, destroyed some (but not all) of its appeal, fixed some (but not enough) of its problems, and jeopardised the whole endeavour by making the same mistake twice and rushing it to market before it was steady on its feet. Prince of Persia is strong and supple enough to survive this with many of its immense virtues intact. But it deserved so much better. [Christmas 2004, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It may not satisfy armchair warmongers used to Supreme Commander’s intimidating depths, but RA3 never threatens to take itself that seriously, and nor would you want it to. [Christmas 2008, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    NeverDead's heart is in the right place: committed to entertaining you, no matter the cost - even if it means losing your head a few too many times along the way. [March 2012, p.120]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A tiny game with some big ideas. [Sept 2012, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Diablo still contains enough impulsive monster-slaying to entertain, but the trek from its home on PC has left it diminished.