Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,611 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Orange Box
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,611 game reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mario Kart 8 is yet another overwhelmingly powerful argument in favour of the company’s idiosyncratic approach to design.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A game that's more than the sum of its parts. [Dec 2009, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    GTAIV’s modern weapons spit bullets like angry hornets until a health circle depletes; here, lives end in uncompromising fashion. For the western aficionado, it is viciously accurate; for the fan of wanton sandbox carnage, it is comically frank.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Super Smash Bros is a series that has often been unfairly derided as button-mashing, largely thanks to its surface sheen of cutesy characters, but it has one of the most enduringly innovative and deep systems of any fighter. [Apr 2008, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The freedom of movement requires a new level of spatial imagination. Before Prince of Persia, platform games were like playing Tetris with only the blocks and bars. [Christmas 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If L4D2 is sometimes over-complicated by its glut of small innovations, then it also substantially rewards the player with its few large ideas: confusion gives way to depth and dynamism, grander thrills and starker dramas. We’re still interested in the fate of the original game’s heroes, but this sequel affirms that the way ahead is due south.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A work of progressive genius that hauls its staid genre up by the bootstraps and takes its place alongside the WOWs and Oblivions of this world. It's altogether too good to be true. [Christmas 2006, p.74]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An ambitious and largely successful attempt to meld the accuracy of traditional firstperson battling with the extra spatial agility and awareness afforded by thirdperson movement. It does feel slightly overdone, but not to the point of obscuring its offering of intensity and flighty action. [May 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Charting a course through Earth's imminent destruction is as unashamedly difficult as it was in 1994's X-COM. It's possible, through bad planning and bad management, to doom the planet early on, making the game feel unfair. Get it right, however – survive the stresses of management, and the strains of aliens – and you'll feel like world's greatest hero.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like the very best narratives, Thirty Flights Of Loving relies on economy more than excess, and it races you breathlessly to its conclusion rather than herding you through an awkward gauntlet of false choices and bottlenecks.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Borderlands 2 might not develop extensively on its forebear, but it has even greater power to hold you for hours on end, deftly weaving RPG stat development with skill-based play. It's enough to make every decision you make meaningful and fun, and lend the realisation that Gearbox knows more about the fundamentals of the shooter than almost any other developer.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a game designed to exhaust the world’s supply of adjectives. It’s a world littered with riches - tiny details sewn into a vast, varied and utterly spectacular canvas. [Sept 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Playdead's debut title is a rare thing – a wholly realised place as well as a successfully realised game, and both Limbo and the Limbo inside it are one-of-a-kind places to be stuck in.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Awakening offers an excellent game of strategy, but it’s the relationship system that makes it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Far Cry 3 asked for the definition of insanity, and its sequel answers it. [Jan 2014, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The only real criticism that can be levelled at Knights of the Old Republic is that, particularly towards the end of the game, it all feels fairly easy, but then this is a game that's designed to be experienced rather than conquered, and lightsaber wielding Jedi aren't supposed to find things difficult. [Oct 2003, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is an instinctive, ingenious joy to play for every minute, and it sets a new gold standard for game interface design on any platform. [Sept 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A vast, almost encyclopaedic look at the united nations of rally, Dirt 3 doesn't feel definitive despite America – it wouldn't feel definitive without it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    SFXT successfully combines the best of the most popular 2D and 3D fighting games in the world, proves Capcom's most newcomer-friendly fighter, and boasts a combat system of bewildering depth. If any company was going to move the genre forward, it seems fitting that it's the one that invented it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    From its sluggish, restrictive start, Human Revolution opens into a world of scintillating possibility in which your actions' significance reaches far into the future. And with something like that difficult future approaching fast, Human Revolution achieves a rare accolade: it's not just a great game, but a timely one.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The game's unflinching depiction of wartime suffering is particularly unsettling in a medium that commonly focuses on pyrotechnics and headshots. [Jan 2014, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The central achievement of Minecraft is a willingness to let the player define the experience; to make them the most interesting element in a world that's already dynamic and fascinating. It's a decision that has made designer Markus Persson a millionaire, and it's ensured that the most important PC game of the past five years is also the most timely.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So if Arkham Asylum was defined by its limits, Arkham City is a careful, considered exercise in stripping those limits away. Its open city lets players be a different kind of Batman to the stealthy predator of Asylum – this is the Batman of dropped smoke pellets and theatrical getaways, the Batman with an ear to the ground for the strong picking on the weak, and the Batman who floats above the city with a gothic majesty.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As an accessible, powerful game-building tool, LBP 3 is remarkable, and offers more scope than we dared to expect. [Christmas 2014, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Reach is a fine conclusion to Bungie's stewardship of the series, but that's what stops it from being anything more. Halo felt like the future. Reach is merely a brilliantly engineered present.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is Mario like you’ve never seen him before, and unlike so many of his next-gen rivals, he nips along at an effortless 60fps. If the true measure of new hardware’s worth is how stark the difference is between it and what came before, then this is the most next-gen game that 2013 has yet produced.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fez
    The route you pick through Polytron's floating world is nearly impossible to verbalise, while its puzzles resolve themselves in your mind unexpectedly, in clear, wordless chunks. There's really no language to cover many of the things you get up to in Fez. For a videogame in 2012, that may be the ultimate endorsement.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fight Night has tirelessly rebuilt itself when many expected retirement. Cautious improvements from Round 4 - the removal of the cut-man game and automation of recovery - have been confidently reinforced, while ring physics, ragdolls and cloth dynamics are in a different class to the chaotic Round 3. [Apr 2011, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The micromanagement is on a previously unimagined macro scale and yet is accessible and coherent enough to draw you in, making hours of concentrated playtime pass like minutes. [Dec 2003, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To give in to its spell, you just need to let go. [Christmas 2014, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine