Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,620 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Last of Us
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,620 game reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Journey's real issue, if it has one, goes much deeper than that. It's a resolutely linear game in which your range of interactions is minimal. For some, that will make it a pretty but hollow novelty; boring, perhaps. But for those who play games to explore strange lands, see beautiful sights and to immerse themselves – for however brief a time – in a new world, Journey is perfect. And what's more, they'll find someone like them to share it with.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although the basic joy of rolling realistic water around might be short-lived, it's bolstered by the far greater satisfaction of solving the game's intuitive, well-paced puzzles. [Jan 2011, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's clever without being intimidating, delicate without being volatile, and immediate without a sense of panic. [Feb 2011, p.99]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This new outing for Sega’s ever-appealing sports series is a deeper, more serious and demanding beast than before, yet happily manages to retain the series’ lighthearted atmosphere and is, on occasion, utterly bonkers. [Apr 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The improvements are so varied, polished and deep to make any devotee of the game consider upgrading. In fact, its range is extensive enough to make those who turned their nose up at the business-as-usual nature of UT2003 come storming back. [May 2004, p.98]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Has enough in that expertly-pitched control system to keep you replaying the same courses over and over, relaxing into a groove before smashing through the score barrier on one perfect run. It's an iPhone game you'll come back to for the controls alone – and that's not something you can't say every day.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    MotoGP may only bring a handful of new bikes and tracks, but it’s still a handsome package. [July 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an incredible achievement, the closest a simulator has come to entertainment; the nearest videogaming has come to the real experience of driving. Forget play. Just drive. [March 2005, p.84]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a vehicle that may win over more action fans than true-bloods, but its plagiaristic tendencies represent a shrewd way of ensuring that the series gets a firm footing outside of the 2D realm. [Nov 2010, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Quarrel DX is the funniest and most stylish word game around, with layers of strategy that go down so deep it sometimes feels you're just scratching the surface. Even without multiplayer this is an essential purchase. With multiplayer, it could take over the world – or, at the very least, be the thinking person's Angry Birds.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The stuff of legend, then? Indeed. Although, perhaps fittingly, one with nothing new to say. [Apr 2010, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unlike the creature at its centre, Isolation isn't structurally perfect, but it is brilliantly hostile in a way that's likely to shock many players. [Dec 2014, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What is most amazing of all is that despite its litany of weird little problems, Destiny is fantastic, its combat up there with the very best, the thrilling rhythm of its battles still not fading the 30th time through, and it has no single systemic problem that is not fixable. [Dec 2014, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whereas a more comprehensive reimagining of how Okami would work on DS could have resulted in a less ambitious, more polished game, Okamiden succeeds in preserving both the spirit and form of its forebear, and that makes in rather special indeed. [Mar 2011, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if some of the fundamental stuff has been sacrificed to the creation of this huge world, Fuel still makes it across the finish line on a far-from-empty tank. [July 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the best entry in its genre since Bayonetta, and might just be the best game Ninja Theory has made to date.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where next for Pokemon? Black and White don't suggest any answers, but they do remind us why we'd care in the first place. [Mar 2011, p.103]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite these minor imperfections F-Zero GX has it where it counts. The combination of blistering speed, responsive controls and rivals with genuine personality makes this one of the most addictive games of the year. [Oct 2003, p.96]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where next for Pokemon? Black and White don't suggest any answers, but they do remind us why we'd care in the first place. [Mar 2011, p.103]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like "GTA" there's more to this than shock and awe. Within its linear structure there is a lot of freedom within which to act, much more so than both "Splinter Cell" and "Metal Gear Solid 2," the titles which Manhunt most closely resembles. [Jan 2004, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A colourfully written and often funny game, but one that doesn't deviate much from the fantasy rulebook, an area where a more substantial break from the past would have been welcome. [Sept 2014, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a clutch of intricate puzzle stages and some tough daily challenges for players chasing mastery, Ookibloks challenges mind and thumbs in equal measure.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Through judicious pruning and reweaving Naughty Dog has crafted one of the finest action adventures to date. It’s involving in its narrative, a triumph of pacing, and simply a pleasure to play. [Christmas 2007, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not since Yoshi's Island's designers broke out the crayons has a Nintendo platformer looked so much like a work of craft, but it's a pity that, for the most part, the levels don't feel as fresh as they look - a platform made of butterfly stitching is still just a platform. [Christmas 2010, p.93]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A love letter to the NES era, Shovel Knight is punishingly difficult, a game of quick reflexes and exacting precision. [Sept 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Intelligent Systems takes great care to shape its RPG for portable play. The world is divided into Super Mario Bros-style levels that each pack a tidy little narrative. Levelling is removed in order to keep these vignettes grind-free. And it's all wrapped up in Nintendo's typically hilarious localisation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a whiff of trial and error at times, but no puzzle's Eureka moment comes by accident. [Sept 2014, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Level-5 and Studio Ghibli's contributions are harmonious. As a game, Ni No Kuni builds upon classic JRPG foundations, eschewing the evolutions of Xenoblade Chronicles and Final Fantasy XII. But the assured flair with which Level-5 has implemented each of the game's classic components combines with Ghibli's masterful storytelling to deliver a JRPG that's quite unlike any other.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s hard to find reasons not to point to Exit as a prime piece of PSP gaming. It’s rich colours and bold stylings bring out the best in the machine’s screen; the short, compelling levels are perfect for playing in bite-sized chunks, and wi-fi connectivity means new levels – of which Taito has already made a good few available - will sustain your enthusiasm longterm. [Fe 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This sequel isn't the leap forward the concept deserves, but it's a testament to the original that it remains a standout personality over two years on, at a point when quality platform games have become thin on the ground. [Mar 2011, p.99]