Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,808 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 LittleBigPlanet
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2808 game reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is no Guitar Hero, or even a rhythm-action game, but something more akin to a portable notepad for musicians. [Nov 2007, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Although Suikoden 3 is better than the average Japenese RPG, it's clear that with the move to 3D Konami has tried to freshen the formula. But by watering down the series' bastion gameplay elements it may have alienated all but the fanatics. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Chaos Legion isn't as sharp as it should be. Beautiful, polished and at times engaging Capaom's latest invention, nevertheless, tests neither the reactions nor the brain enough to hold your interest. [May 2003, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though the game’s confidence falters, its storytelling never does, building a new myth with the kind of passion and resonance expected from an eastern retelling of an old one, and enriching the entire sweep of its universe. [June 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While World Of Warcraft and its peers provide variety through landscape, Hellgate fails utterly to conjure any motivation to investigate the next instanced dungeon. [Christmas 2007, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all the atmospheric window-dressing, it doesn't extend its reach beyond competent familiarity. [Jan 2007, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's simple, accessible and ultimately disposable stuff. Not the sprawling adventure you were hoping for, but fun nonetheless. [Apr 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are things to admire here, and The Ball's simple challenges ensure a pleasant, if casual engagement, enhanced by the skilful drawing of this subterranean world. [Dec 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The irony is that many of Too Human’s problems wouldn’t exist if another pair of human players were allowed to enter the fold (as was originally intended) – speeding up play considerably and making ‘just one more run’ into something a little more manageable. [Oct 2008, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The overriding impression is of a game that's physically too big for its action. [June 2009, p.88]
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's never worse than pleasant, and the evergreen villages, the jaunty swagger of its cows and donkeys and the peaceful expansion of your city are exactly the kind of recharging experiences Taylor talked about providing four years ago. It's only a shame that the repetition, and a lack of anything to look forward to, mean that you eventually realise your grass still needs to be cut.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Like the first Gears, Ryse is a simple game loaded with small-scale encounters and rudimentary set-pieces with the intention of hustling you towards something beautiful. Both have their own ‘horror’ stage, both have sieges, both have stationary guns of sorts, and Ryse, like Gears, has room to grow if given the chance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s a product of a time when hardened roleplayers were better noted for their patience – and its difficult to see many players tackling the adventure in its entirety. The walking speed for example, especially in the overworld, proves irritating in its sluggishness. [Feb 2007, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Too much of it is cut from old cloth instead of woven from its own loom. [Aug 2015, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is a stupefyingly linear experience. While the individual stand-offs and shoot-outs are exhilirating, the removal of any sense of choice or any requirement of tactical thought makes this more of a theme park ride than a military operation. [Christmas 2003, p.117]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite the obvious staying power of the game’s mechanics that has made it a hit in all its various iterations, it strains to push itself beyond its one-note colour-matching principle into truly engaging puzzling. [Aug 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ultimately, owners of Sega GT should ask themselves whether a handful of new elements and the online component are worth the investment (even at the reduced price). [Feb 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In refusing to let the PSP’s home-console-style graphical capabilities dictate the nature of its gameplay, Acid is a valuable blueprint for future PSP development. [Feb 2005, p.77]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Its pacing is hindered by slow movement speed, and nuance is lost as the incidents increase in frequency and topics of conversation shift from the social to the situational. [March 2016, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Where FlatOut felt like racing in a field, FlatOut 2 feels like racing on a film set. It has been reshaped into the archetype, competent arcade racer. [Aug 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    One of the 3DS launch line-up's visual standouts: colourful, crisp and with horizons that have never looked so distant. It's disappointing, then, that you'll discover its limits so quickly. [Apr 2011, p.90]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is a package filled with value and historic charm, but viewed devoid of nostalgic mist, the earliest installments of the series feel little more than average. [March 2003, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all its polish, Reflect Missile has managed to retain the loose energy of a quirky prototype: a 500 Nintendo Point exercise in pure mechanics that is lithe – and slight – enough to suggest that a talented designer may have knocked the whole thing up over an inspired series of lunch breaks.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As tightly designed and finely balanced as it is, it's hard to shake the feeling that you're endlessly replaying a tutorial.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It may have few aspirations beyond being a dumb FPS, but it never fails to make the most of its limited talents. [Christmas 2007, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Uncharacteristically watered-down. [Aug 2015, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all the spectacle of Resonance's gunfights, the game feels restrictive. It's a strategy game in which your tactical options are limited to one or two reliable strategies, and an RPG in which character development is chained to similar lines. [May 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The handling hasn’t evolved and a year on, with the masking novelty of the game’s tuning aspects worn off, it’s disappointingly limited and remote. And despite the increased choice and plot introduction the whole exercise can often feel soulless. [Christmas 2004, p.60]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Colourful, crafty, and cheerily free of ambitions, it's the perfect companion for a drowsy early morning commute.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Design flaws include a bizarre decision to cordon off most of the ship after completion, locking away any unique items you previously overlooked. Much of the game commendably favours stealth players but the rest can feel shambolic.