Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,818 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Orange Box
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2818 game reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is a package filled with value and historic charm, but viewed devoid of nostalgic mist, the earliest installments of the series feel little more than average. [March 2003, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all its polish, Reflect Missile has managed to retain the loose energy of a quirky prototype: a 500 Nintendo Point exercise in pure mechanics that is lithe – and slight – enough to suggest that a talented designer may have knocked the whole thing up over an inspired series of lunch breaks.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As tightly designed and finely balanced as it is, it's hard to shake the feeling that you're endlessly replaying a tutorial.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It may have few aspirations beyond being a dumb FPS, but it never fails to make the most of its limited talents. [Christmas 2007, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Uncharacteristically watered-down. [Aug 2015, p.121]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all the spectacle of Resonance's gunfights, the game feels restrictive. It's a strategy game in which your tactical options are limited to one or two reliable strategies, and an RPG in which character development is chained to similar lines. [May 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The handling hasn’t evolved and a year on, with the masking novelty of the game’s tuning aspects worn off, it’s disappointingly limited and remote. And despite the increased choice and plot introduction the whole exercise can often feel soulless. [Christmas 2004, p.60]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Colourful, crafty, and cheerily free of ambitions, it's the perfect companion for a drowsy early morning commute.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Design flaws include a bizarre decision to cordon off most of the ship after completion, locking away any unique items you previously overlooked. Much of the game commendably favours stealth players but the rest can feel shambolic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though the setting is clichéd and you’ll have experienced all the tricks Frictional has pulled to construct Black Plague’s menacing atmosphere before (echoed voices, bestial groans, oppressive shadows, flickering lights), they’re highly effective. [Apr 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s rarely elegant – a horde of zombie cosmonauts exited our ship as quickly as they entered after arriving next to a hull breach – but in battling back from the brink of obliteration there are moments you’ll feel like a surrogate Kirk. Crashes, glitches and repetition break the spell, but when it’s time for some thrilling heroics Star Command proves itself a worthwhile enterprise.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The comic hit rate is lower here than you might have hoped for, but Telltale shows a commendable knowledge of when to simply emulate the Sam & Max of old and when to move forward. [Dec 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As an example of unabashed, often exuberant Britsoft that pulls out the SRPG's staples and rebinds it in approachable ease, Future Tactics is remarkable, deserving of cult status. [Aug 2004, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For the time being, Exordium represents a kind of success, even if it’s tempered by the evident struggle to achieve an objective that may, in the end, prove to be a fool’s errand.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sonic Unleashed isn’t quite the spectacular return to form promised, but it’s a hell of a lot closer than Sega’s other recent efforts. [Jan 2009, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a detour into new territory that will satisfy co-op players as it maintains, rather than distills, the essence of its ancestry. [Dec 2011, p.122]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    You'll find a number of technical issues plaguing the game, from scenery clipping to inconsistent collision and some hideously low resolution textures. But the game's relentless dedication to giving you violent bangs for your bucks goes some way to compensating for them. Because Twisted Metal at its best delivers exactly what it sets out to: a messy, manic and tasteless treat.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A good all-round introduction to the tactical FPS. Glitzy and attractive, but ultimately a little empty, there’s also no doubt that it lives up to its name. [Christmas 2006, p.79]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Rather than developing the original’s ideas, it’s content to simply reuse them. Zipping around via a network of boost tiles no longer carries the same thrill, and though squeezing the shoulder button as a monster passes by a translucent platform remains one of the most deliciously cruel ways to dispose of an enemy, repeating the trick diminishes its impact.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Area 51 is entirely without inspiration, an exercise in slick, crowd-pleasing cookie-cutter cliché from the Jerry Bruckheimer school of entertainment manufacture. It is absolutely not bad, almost never broken, and usually a good deal of fun. [July 2005, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's good to see Inman opting for something other than a straight sequel, but this is one space odyssey that won't last you much longer than a pleasant hour or so.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    More intelligent than your average online shooter, ... this quirky concept deserves recognition. [May 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There's nothing to stop a dedicated RPG fan from having a thoroughly good time but the Arc the Lad games have always had a derivative heritage and this is competent but sadly no different. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A thrilling ride, but with so little strategic variety, and without the benefit of multiplayer, a certain sameness takes hold and unfortunately cuts short what could have been a fantastic portable shooter resurgence. [Christmas 2005, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Something of a quirky offshoot than a bold new puzzling dawn. [Jan 2007, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An acceptable game rising from the foundations of a great one. Hutch has proved it can do amazing things with Apple's touchscreen but, this time at least, it's provided dubious implementation of almost everything else.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With its extravagant art direction, Samurai Warriors was the obvious franchise for Koei to debut on Nintendo's new platform. The surprise is how well the simple combat and new ideas work as a portable experience. [May 2011, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Like the first game, it remains a competent but ultimately restrained title. [June 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Multiplayer’s not much better, and is a rare area in which Shadow Fall suffers technically, the action slowing to a crawl when things get busy thanks to an unlocked framerate.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though still unique, Patapon's crisp, minimalist art design and central mechanic is no longer a strong enough draw to excuse its repetitiveness and price tag. [May 2011, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine