Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,559 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 LittleBigPlanet
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,559 game reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The Great Escape is saved by a few good set-pieces and the licence, but it's hard not to feel hard done by. Those willing to endure yet another stealth game could find their morale ebbing away by the end of this. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    This is a perfectly awful conversion with poor controls, cumbersome combat, an antiquarian save system, inadequate maps and clumsy menu design. [Jan 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As [Vince] laments the formulaic impositions of the game in successive cut-scenes, it only serves to remind you how much of a chore it is to play - and raises the question; why does every platform hero have to be a wiseguy? [Dec 2003, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You get the impression the only person who cares about Kain's legacy any more is the writer. The turgid battling lets an average game down. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Shadow Ops feels like a game put together by a team bored by the clich├ęs of the genre and the special forces material it was given to work with. This quickly communicates itself to the player. [Aug 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Firefights become more surreal than menacing when the worst-case scenario is of your fellow GIs having to catch their breath for a few seconds after being riddled with bullets. [Aug 2004, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For such a costly flagship title to provide neither the promised statement of mainstream grown-up appeal nor even polished, lesser disposable thrills is a landmark failure. [May 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Ends up feeling like it's been built by PC game developers obsessed with quick saves. There's absolutely no creative latitude; it's a case of remembering where enemies appear and getting them before they get you. [May 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's a game that makes you desperately want to feel like a Jedi, arcing your lightsaber across the screen, ducking under attacks, parrying counters and going in for the kill, but the subtlety just isn't there. [July 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Levels feature numerous boss battles and a stream of identikit foot soldiers, but merrily send the player back to square one when their lone life is over and make the singleplayer story mode an agonising exercise in self-abuse. [June 2005, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The possibility of this all coming together in a more flexible and engaging manner is still a welcome one. But, for a game based on a culture of reputation, craftsmanship and leaving a mark, Getting Up is one that'll pass by largely unnoticed. [Mar 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With the exceptions of deplorably bad cutscenes and haphazard signposting, there are few significant flaws here that a steadier gestation couldn't have resolved. [Aug 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    By keeping it real, the game retains many of the things that make navigating the real city more of a pain than a pleasure: countless faceless skyscrapers don't make for memorable landmarks, and facing the wrong way down a jammed one-way street when you're in a hurry to get somewhere is the sort of challenge few will relish. [Jan 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For all its wit and swagger, Truckers is inescapably safety-conscious, rewarding the maintenance of a planned route and steady trajectory while more arresting notions - spontaneous risk, for example - fall from the back like poorly fastened cases of moonshine. [Sept 2005, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Yes, Beat Down revives the warped charisma of Capcom's beat'em up heyday, but that's the only area where it actually triumphs. [Oct 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's just not accurate or tangible enough to be rewarding, handling with the same kind of wool as Sonic's 3D platformers. [Apr 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that's both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Something of a departure, sure, but it's nothing new. Falling awkwardly between action and strategy, it's unlikely to satisfy anyone other than rabidly obsessive fans of the character.
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, no sooner does Geist suggest it can blossom into something fresh and exciting that it's undermined at every turn by a frustrating insistence on being nothing more than a mundane firstperson shooter. [Oct 2005, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a promising set-up, but one that’s flawed at nearly every level... You’re left with the overwhelming sensation of a Christmas present with no batteries to go in it. [Nov 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's telling that the more dejected and hoarse your voice becomes, the easier it seems for the forces to understand their orders. Whoever programmed Odama's English speech recognition clearly wasn't having much fun either. [May 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    By keeping it real, the game retains many of the things that make navigating the real city more of a pain than a pleasure: countless faceless skyscrapers don't make for memorable landmarks, and facing the wrong way down a jammed one-way street when you're in a hurry to get somewhere is the sort of challenge few will relish. [Jan 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's just not accurate or tangible enough to be rewarding, handling with the same kind of wool as Sonic's 3D platformers. [Apr 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's just too hard, the physics too capricious, and the tasks too frustrating for words. [Aug 2006, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a title trying hard to inject personality into the genre, the experience feels irreparably mechanical. There's plenty of variety in terms of racing categories and machinery, but the overall lack of involvement is inexcusable. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's almost a relief that the game struggling to break free from these severe technical shortcomings is mundane. [May 2011, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Whether there truly is a demand for the high-fidelity thrills found on other formats among shooter-starved Wii owners is largely academic, because Conduit 2 - like its predecessor - just isn't up to the task of providing them. [June 2011, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Darkspore remains a humdrum deep-space Diablo, but one doomed to be defined more by what it's missing than what it offers. [June 2011, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine