Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,535 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Last of Us
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,535 game reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's just not accurate or tangible enough to be rewarding, handling with the same kind of wool as Sonic's 3D platformers. [Apr 2006, p.93]
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's just too hard, the physics too capricious, and the tasks too frustrating for words. [Aug 2006, p.85]
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a title trying hard to inject personality into the genre, the experience feels irreparably mechanical. There's plenty of variety in terms of racing categories and machinery, but the overall lack of involvement is inexcusable. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's almost a relief that the game struggling to break free from these severe technical shortcomings is mundane. [May 2011, p.104]
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Whether there truly is a demand for the high-fidelity thrills found on other formats among shooter-starved Wii owners is largely academic, because Conduit 2 - like its predecessor - just isn't up to the task of providing them. [June 2011, p.92]
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Darkspore remains a humdrum deep-space Diablo, but one doomed to be defined more by what it's missing than what it offers. [June 2011, p.98]
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The plot may be filled with sub-Lynchian fumbles, but it weaves an intriguing story, while the charismatic muddle of awards that accompanies each solution goes some way to wiping away the grey memory of what you're actually being congratulated for.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    What Level-5 has created is a Frankenstein's monster. It's half singleplayer and half multiplayer, and both of them are half good: a compromise that leaves much of this game feeling soulless. To give WKC2 its due, it certainly improves on the original. But in trying to fix a poor template rather than start anew, it was probably doomed from the beginning.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    If the Old West is anything, it's a giant myth, and one that the Call Of Juarez games have always embodied. What The Cartel replaces this with – a mishmash of 
The Shield and conspiracy theories – is a much less substantial vision, played out within a world with no real resonance to it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Occasionally, the glow of sheer ambition nudges polish-related problems away from the light, allowing a few glorious moments to gaze upon what EYE could've been. But un-met ambition isn't enough.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Bodycount's lack of consistent game design, flitting between arcadey action and a sub-par story-driven campaign, ultimately causes the game to misfire. The lesser parts of Bodycount's gameplay ultimately shout the loudest, drowning out its charms and distracting from the flourishes of inspired ideas.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The bottom line is that Rise Of Nightmares isn't as engaging or exciting as AM1's established brand. It's also too adult in its content to appeal to the younger users who might enjoy its gimmicky use of Kinect.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You can see things worth admiring here. The promise of sandbox combat emerging from the interplay between environment and gun-modes never comes good, instead devolving into a repetitive, gruelling bedlam - but that promise alone is more than many shooters offer. To make anything of it, however, Hard Reset would need to go right back to the drawing board.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In music, bad tribute acts play pubs and weddings: in games, they sit at the top of the charts.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As an interim project, it's good to see Criterion still interested in its most beloved IP, but it's just a shame there's so little of interest in the game itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    This is a smart template for future fun, but the details need work. When it comes to getting this kind of game onto iOS then, Madfinger has, in more ways than one, done all the boring bits.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    An over-complicated take on a classic recipe.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In-app purchases require delicate balancing, but with T-Coin bundles costing up to £69.99, and annual T-Club subscriptions available for £20.99 a year, EA could hardly be more obvious in letting you know that, as far as it's concerned, the 69p you paid to download the game was only the beginning.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The first Flipper wasn't a great piece of work, necessarily, but it had its own agenda and was powered by some pleasantly esoteric coding. The sequel, wonky and compromised, can't even claim that honour.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It says a lot that a dancing game is the best thing on offer in this muddled, cynical package. For the most part, Kinect Star Wars feels ill-conceived: kids will be bored, and adults will be embarrassed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Occasionally gripping but frequently unfulfilling, Sniper Elite V2 comes in at a heavy price for a package that's all gore and little reward.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You'll trudge endlessly around the forest, cursing your protagonist's languid walk speed as you wander from one already visited landmark to the next in the vague hope of triggering the next bit of scripting in a narrative which goes out of its way to confuse the player.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Cheap bosses and stingy save points ensure that it's a drag as well as a bore, while a handful of crash bugs do very little to improve proceedings. My Little Hero's greatest charm is its air of sweet innocence, perhaps, but in truth this adventure is primitive rather than childlike.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The series' modest ambitions are here scaled back to a glum inventory of FPS conventions, its spectacle dampened by hardware limitations and dormant art direction, and its platform-specific novelties largely revealed as fussy irritations, presumably born of a need to promote the struggling Vita's features.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Moops isn't a bad idea for a iOS title, then, but it's extremely poorly implemented. For a game about bug hunting, it's failed to catch enough of its own.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's a long, repetitive grind that fails to reward your efforts. [Sept 2012, p.100]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Should a game about surviving an alcoholic, abusive parent be fun? Probably not. But it gains nothing from being wearying and frustrating.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Even at its best, when using the AV8R stick, Damage Inc feels clumsy, badly implemented and lacking in imagination. Mad Catz is unlikely to drive sales of its peripherals with a game in which every flight feels like work and every kill is, at best, a Pyrrhic victory in a tedious war.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    At its best, Orgarhythm's disparate ingredients coalesce into scenes of thrilling tribal warfare, a winningly eclectic soundtrack stirring your men to march into battle. Too often, however, you end up feeling like your fragmented cabal: disorientated, frustrated and battered into submission by an unforgiving enemy, with little reason to keep on fighting.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Its foundations aren't sturdy enough to hold any longterm weight. [Feb 2013, p.110]