Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,579 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 LittleBigPlanet
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,579 game reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In-app purchases require delicate balancing, but with T-Coin bundles costing up to £69.99, and annual T-Club subscriptions available for £20.99 a year, EA could hardly be more obvious in letting you know that, as far as it's concerned, the 69p you paid to download the game was only the beginning.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The first Flipper wasn't a great piece of work, necessarily, but it had its own agenda and was powered by some pleasantly esoteric coding. The sequel, wonky and compromised, can't even claim that honour.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It says a lot that a dancing game is the best thing on offer in this muddled, cynical package. For the most part, Kinect Star Wars feels ill-conceived: kids will be bored, and adults will be embarrassed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Occasionally gripping but frequently unfulfilling, Sniper Elite V2 comes in at a heavy price for a package that's all gore and little reward.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You'll trudge endlessly around the forest, cursing your protagonist's languid walk speed as you wander from one already visited landmark to the next in the vague hope of triggering the next bit of scripting in a narrative which goes out of its way to confuse the player.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Cheap bosses and stingy save points ensure that it's a drag as well as a bore, while a handful of crash bugs do very little to improve proceedings. My Little Hero's greatest charm is its air of sweet innocence, perhaps, but in truth this adventure is primitive rather than childlike.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The series' modest ambitions are here scaled back to a glum inventory of FPS conventions, its spectacle dampened by hardware limitations and dormant art direction, and its platform-specific novelties largely revealed as fussy irritations, presumably born of a need to promote the struggling Vita's features.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Moops isn't a bad idea for a iOS title, then, but it's extremely poorly implemented. For a game about bug hunting, it's failed to catch enough of its own.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's a long, repetitive grind that fails to reward your efforts. [Sept 2012, p.100]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Should a game about surviving an alcoholic, abusive parent be fun? Probably not. But it gains nothing from being wearying and frustrating.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Even at its best, when using the AV8R stick, Damage Inc feels clumsy, badly implemented and lacking in imagination. Mad Catz is unlikely to drive sales of its peripherals with a game in which every flight feels like work and every kill is, at best, a Pyrrhic victory in a tedious war.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    At its best, Orgarhythm's disparate ingredients coalesce into scenes of thrilling tribal warfare, a winningly eclectic soundtrack stirring your men to march into battle. Too often, however, you end up feeling like your fragmented cabal: disorientated, frustrated and battered into submission by an unforgiving enemy, with little reason to keep on fighting.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Its foundations aren't sturdy enough to hold any longterm weight. [Feb 2013, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s simply baffling that it manages to make so many mistakes within such a well-worn template.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Star Trek has more bugs crawling on it than a Fear Factor contestant. Sometimes the results are amusing, as in the turbolift example, but frequently they just make life a drag.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With Dust, CCP promised something that had never even been attempted before, and it delivered. Dust takes place in Eve. The setting is the same, the currency is the same, and the corporations can hold players from both universes. It’s just not enough. Because without Eve, there’s no point to Dust, a bland free-to-play FPS that can’t even capture the continent-spanning scale of PlanetSide 2, despite having a whole galaxy to play with.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    If Fuse had been made by a lesser known studio, it would simply be forgettable, but set against the expectations of a new game from the house of Rachet & Clank and Resistance, it’s a crushing disappointment.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The game is also lumbered with a tragic split personality. On one hand, there’s a lot to do, and if you like the look of one of the initial five heroes you can do all of it for free with a little grinding. On the other hand, Marvel Heroes is so eager for you to spend – and so keen to extract the most out of your wallet when you do – that the price tag of the game in real-world terms can soon become astonishingly disproportionate to its quality.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Hexodius’ dungeon sections aren’t involved enough to offer interesting choices or exploration, but last just long enough to qualify as clunky menu screens.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    While the original aimed to capture our hearts, the sequel only seems to be after our wallets.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sonic games, and platformers in general, have always been about memorising the lay of the land, but rarely have mistakes been so costly or heavily punished, and it says much that one retailer’s preorder bonus consists solely of 25 additional lives.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    At a base level, this is simply too forgettable to give players a good enough reason to return. Perhaps it would be different if Zombie had been more lenient with its economy, allowing you to try more before committing to buy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Lords Of Shadow 2 is clunky, ugly and deeply misguided. It’s a game that sees the lord of the damned as a vehicle for rat-powered linear stealth, and that takes a future-Gothic London setting and then sets the action in tower blocks and sewers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Arzest has laid an egg here, but not of the golden variety.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Much as it saddens us, given the promise of seeing a 3D Ghost Trick, we pronounce this dead on arrival.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Infinity is extremely limited, both in terms of what little content it offers and your ability to access it. [Aug 2014, p.119]
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Supernauts is both too limited to succeed as a town-builder and frustratingly restrictive as a creative tool, while its superhero interludes are disempowering and dull. [Sept 2014, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sure, Platinum has made flawed games before, but nothing nearly so bland or as uninspiring as this. [Christmas 2014, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There's practically no aspect that doesn't appear half-hearted. Black Isle's drawn-out death has undoubtedly poisoned Brotherhood, but it's hard to tell if there was ever a good game here to begin with. [May 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Inspired moments, such as the vehicles' mulitple weapons systems, are forced from the mind by the relentless slogs across the levels... In the end, you're likely to discover that the real battle is to continue playing. [May 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine