Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,611 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Rock Band 3
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,611 game reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Occasionally, the glow of sheer ambition nudges polish-related problems away from the light, allowing a few glorious moments to gaze upon what EYE could've been. But un-met ambition isn't enough.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Lords Of Shadow 2 is clunky, ugly and deeply misguided. It’s a game that sees the lord of the damned as a vehicle for rat-powered linear stealth, and that takes a future-Gothic London setting and then sets the action in tower blocks and sewers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There’s a nugget of brilliance at the heart of Micro Machines that’s too simple and solid to crush, it’s true, but the laughable track editor, fussy interface and baffling load times certainly don’t justify this release. [Aug 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With the exceptions of deplorably bad cutscenes and haphazard signposting, there are few significant flaws here that a steadier gestation couldn’t have resolved. [Aug 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Its foundations aren't sturdy enough to hold any longterm weight. [Feb 2013, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Shadow Ops feels like a game put together by a team bored by the clichés of the genre and the special forces material it was given to work with. This quickly communicates itself to the player. [Aug 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The possibility of this all coming together in a more flexible and engaging manner is still a welcome one. But, for a game based on a culture of reputation, craftsmanship and leaving a mark, Getting Up is one that’ll pass by largely unnoticed. [Mar 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's just not accurate or tangible enough to be rewarding, handling with the same kind of wool as Sonic's 3D platformers. [Apr 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a series that puts so much stock in its grace and composure, the lack of an intuitive control scheme is hard to overcome. [June 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For all its wit and swagger, Truckers is inescapably safety-conscious, rewarding the maintenance of a planned route and steady trajectory while more arresting notions - spontaneous risk, for example - fall from the back like poorly fastened cases of moonshine. [Sept 2005, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Large-scale, new IP RPGs have been something of a rarity on this handheld, but as higher quality titles start to emerge, conformist and mediocre efforts like this become even less attractive and viable. [Feb 2008, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For all its wit and swagger, Truckers is inescapably safety-conscious, rewarding the maintenance of a planned route and steady trajectory while more arresting notions - spontaneous risk, for example - fall from the back like poorly fastened cases of moonshine. [Sept 2005, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    While the more conventional controls make for a more satisfying experience, they also expose the painful ordinariness of the game. [May 2010, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A stunt-filled shooter in the vein (but not the league) of Stranglehold, it's a game that takes control away, reverts to how things used to be done, and judders between debilitating combat and haywire presentation. [May 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s just too hard, the physics too capricious, and the tasks too frustrating for words. [Aug 2006, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    After a few hours its lack of variation, poor technical accomplishments and above all its deadening mission repetition make for a hulking disappointment. [Aug 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Prinny sabotages the player's platforming with unsympathetic controls. [Aug 2009, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The dev team has an eye for spectacle – a towering golem comprised of cars and other metallic detritus is a visual highlight – but these moments mostly serve to illustrate how dull your actual actions are by contrast. [Dec 2008, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Hexodius’ dungeon sections aren’t involved enough to offer interesting choices or exploration, but last just long enough to qualify as clunky menu screens.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Yes, Beat Down revives the warped charisma of Capcom's beat'em up heyday, but that's the only area where it actually triumphs. [Oct 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    So indebted is dev studio Matrix to the old ways that it seems to have granted a free pass to the old problems. Quest signposting is buried in unclear dialogue snippets, bosses are beaten through trial and error, and grinding is rife. [Dec 2010, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As [Vince] laments the formulaic impositions of the game in successive cut-scenes, it only serves to remind you how much of a chore it is to play - and raises the question; why does every platform hero have to be a wiseguy? [Dec 2003, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A wholly unoriginal creation burdened by memories attached to the good ideas it’s imitating, and made worse by the sloppy execution of basic mechanics. [Oct 2008, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With Dust, CCP promised something that had never even been attempted before, and it delivered. Dust takes place in Eve. The setting is the same, the currency is the same, and the corporations can hold players from both universes. It’s just not enough. Because without Eve, there’s no point to Dust, a bland free-to-play FPS that can’t even capture the continent-spanning scale of PlanetSide 2, despite having a whole galaxy to play with.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Arzest has laid an egg here, but not of the golden variety.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    If Fuse had been made by a lesser known studio, it would simply be forgettable, but set against the expectations of a new game from the house of Rachet & Clank and Resistance, it’s a crushing disappointment.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The fun is spread far too thin. [Sept 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nevermind the sluggish movement, repetitive phrases from trainers, or ability to trap AI in combination patterns: at the most basic level, Prizefighter has suspicious collision detection and a great many gloves that clip through arms and heads. [Aug 2008, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Seemingly conflicted between delivering next-gen graphical impact and providing immediately recognisable objectives, Killer Game errs on the side of form over function, and in turn stumbles though a laundry list of poor design decisions. [Dec 2005, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine