Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,736 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Bloodborne
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2736 game reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The Great Escape is saved by a few good set-pieces and the licence, but it's hard not to feel hard done by. Those willing to endure yet another stealth game could find their morale ebbing away by the end of this. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nintendo is claiming that The Conduit might attract Halo fans to its console, but this game isn’t fit to wait Master Chief’s table.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Once guns are acquired you feel less helpless, but the combat is awkward with enemies reacting poorly to hits and a compulsory manual reload that is ponderous beyond belief. In trying to make the game realistic, Headfirst has grievously shot itself in the foot. [Dec 2005, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With the exceptions of deplorably bad cutscenes and haphazard signposting, there are few significant flaws here that a steadier gestation couldn't have resolved. [Aug 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The majority of insights are lost in a flood of banal dialogue and sluggish, shallow puzzles. [Aug 2009, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    That it feels so leaden despite its busyness, and fails to ignite despite all its gunpowder, is impossible to ignore. [May 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Need for Speed is a disappointing follow-up to the flawed but big-hearted Rivals, and while it's billed as a fresh start for the series, it feels more like a false one. [Christmas 2015, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sure, Platinum has made flawed games before, but nothing nearly so bland or as uninspiring as this. [Christmas 2014, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Instant deaths, glitchy combat, uninspiring boss encounters and twitchy controls conspire to make this a below-par experience. If it wasn't for the occasional flashes of imagination and the familiarity and richness conveyed through the license then The Emperor's Tomb would be utterly forgettable. [May 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that's both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Bodycount's lack of consistent game design, flitting between arcadey action and a sub-par story-driven campaign, ultimately causes the game to misfire. The lesser parts of Bodycount's gameplay ultimately shout the loudest, drowning out its charms and distracting from the flourishes of inspired ideas.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's a fine line between graphic artistry and immaturity, and while Alter Echo makes an attempt at the former, it probably falls into the latter. The hues are creative enough, and the faux-naturelle structures suitably curled and alien but perhaps the real problem is that a world made from plastic would look as dull as it sounds. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    As an interim project, it's good to see Criterion still interested in its most beloved IP, but it's just a shame there's so little of interest in the game itself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a high-profile demonstration of the fact that those who created this much-loved universe have lost their understanding of what originally made it so engaging. [Apr 2006, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You get the impression the only person who cares about Kain's legacy any more is the writer. The turgid battling lets an average game down. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    But it’s hard not to be disappointed that one of gaming’s true visions – of life’s multiplicity and constantly changing nature – should end up broadening itself by slumping into a worn groove of genre pieces and business dogma.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    While the basic mechanic shows promise, the game itself is purely mechanical, and predictably joyless as a result. [July 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The first Flipper wasn't a great piece of work, necessarily, but it had its own agenda and was powered by some pleasantly esoteric coding. The sequel, wonky and compromised, can't even claim that honour.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There’s a nugget of brilliance at the heart of Micro Machines that’s too simple and solid to crush, it’s true, but the laughable track editor, fussy interface and baffling load times certainly don’t justify this release. [Aug 2006, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that’s both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The possibility of this all coming together in a more flexible and engaging manner is still a welcome one. But, for a game based on a culture of reputation, craftsmanship and leaving a mark, Getting Up is one that'll pass by largely unnoticed. [Mar 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A pretty but vapid experience. [Sept 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    An over-complicated take on a classic recipe.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unless you possess a particular zeal for collecting and upgrading slightly different weapons, the familiarity of slicing through yet another batch of spawning creatures soon grinds way at the thin gameplay. [June 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Somebody up there probably regards this as a trailblazing taste of high-concept, one-size-fits-all blockbuster games to come. Consider that, and know true Primal fear. [March 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The virtual interface does little to help players and, if anything, slows the game down as you wait for it to catch up with things that are already evident to players – such as victory, failure and boredom. [Dec 2007, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, no sooner does Geist suggest it can blossom into something fresh and exciting that it's undermined at every turn by a frustrating insistence on being nothing more than a mundane firstperson shooter. [Oct 2005, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's a fine line between graphic artistry and immaturity, and while Alter Echo makes an attempt at the former, it probably falls into the latter. The hues are creative enough, and the faux-naturelle structures suitably curled and alien but perhaps the real problem is that a world made from plastic would look as dull as it sounds. [Nov 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    By keeping it real, the game retains many of the things that make navigating the real city more of a pain than a pleasure: countless faceless skyscrapers don’t make for memorable landmarks, and facing the wrong way down a jammed one-way street when you’re in a hurry to get somewhere is the sort of challenge few will relish. [Jan 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine