Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,628 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Super Mario Galaxy
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,628 game reviews
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Naughty Dog has delivered the most riveting, emotionally resonant story-driven epic of this console generation. At times it’s easy to feel like big-budget development has too much on the line to allow stubbornly artful ideas to flourish, but then a game like The Last Of Us emerges through the crumbled blacktop like a climbing vine, green as a burnished emerald.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    No one makes worlds like Rockstar, but at last it has produced one without compromise. Everything works. It has mechanics good enough to anchor games of their own, and a story that is not only what GTA has always wanted to tell but also fits the way people have always played it. It’s a remarkable achievement, a peerless marriage of world design, storytelling and mechanics that pushes these ageing consoles to the limit and makes it all look easy.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Yes, there's still the freedom to cause havoc, and inevitably you do; the difference is that you’re no longer impelled to toy with GTA IV's world in quite the same sadistic way - you live in it. [June 2008, p.82]
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It all adds up to what is easily the best and most progressive rhythm-action game ever made, if that label even applies anymore. [Christmas 2010, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sega's loss is Nintendo's gain: Bayonetta, twirling away from a gigantic demon's maw and smacking the highest choir of angels on the nose, has just given Wii U its first true classic. [Nov 2014, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As a whole it is almost overwhelming in its depth, irresistible in value and certainly, unreservedly, brilliant. [Dec 2007, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A beautiful and graceful fighting game that lets imagination loose, and winks before slapping Dante, Kratos and every other hero back to the drawing board. [Christmas 2009, p.90]
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s a multiplayer riot, a visual landmark, a feat of engineering, and one of the most charming games ever made. But even those accolades are dwarfed by its scope, its potential, and the apparent endlessness of them both. [Dec 2008, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Half-Life 2 is a first-person shooter. But in action, storytelling, technical achievement, atmosphere and intensity it has far outdone its peers. Valve just hit the top note no other PC game developer could reach...The excuse that 'it's just a game' won't cut it anymore. [Dec 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    How apt that this ultimate tale of hero-making should see Nintendo's hardware become the console it was always meant to be.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    In substance it's nothing new, merely a magnificent, beautiful monster of an FPS sequel. In concept and execution, though, Halo 3 is the future. [Nov 2007, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Since the end of the N64 era, as Nintendo has explored new pastures and methodically tended old ones, it’s been easy to forget the times when every major release from the company felt like this. It’s a bravura piece of design that pulls off stunts no one else has even thought of. [Christmast 2007, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As a whole it is almost overwhelming in its depth, irresistible in value and certainly, unreservedly, brilliant. [Dec 2007, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A dazzling work of dank, abject horror that cements Miyazaki as one of the all-time greats. Sixteen months after PS4's launch, the new generation has finally begun. [May 2015, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This isn't a game that redefines the genre: this is one that rolls it up and locks it away.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Yes, there's still the freedom to cause havoc, and inevitably you do; the difference is that you're no longer impelled to toy with GTA IV's world in quite the same sadistic way - you live in it. [June 2008, p.82]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While certainly being Treasure's most fragmented game, there’s a sense that the lack of narrative, character and even proper framework makes this its most raw, pure and delightful. [June 2008, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a remarkably assured game for such a young studio, the work of a small team that knows exactly what it wants to do and executes it almost without error.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Even if the DNA of its forebears is barely apparent, such a bold, brilliant transformation certainly involves something a little like magic. [Dec 2009, p.100]
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As with previous GTA games there's lots to criticise, but San Andreas survives, scathed but still walking tall, buoyed by the kind of ambition that sees most games crumble under the weight of it all. It's a multi-faceted, multi-achieving experience, a rough-edged but massively substantial landmark. [Christmas 2004, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Every single moment of Four Swords is magically familiar and every single moment is dazzlingly fresh...Whether being experienced in the competitive, co-operative cackle of multiplay, or the captivating atmosphere of singleplayer, the extraordinary virtues of the game itself remain the same. [May 2004, p.96]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The best platformer on iPhone just got better, and there's still no sign of any meaningful competition. [Sept 2009, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No other beat 'em up developer is quite as willing to experiment with the form in a bid to stave off the moribundity that's gradually subsuming the genre. [Import - June 2003, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a puzzle game and a strategy game as much as an action game, then, and like Rockstar's Manhunt, it will sicken you even as it provides its murky thrills.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It can be a little basic in places, and it isn’t a ‘paradigm shift’ in any sense, but it is proof that games can love their roots and use the quality of being a ‘game’ to give form to their stories – and excel at it. [Feb 2008, p.90]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The only thing that's hard to adjust, in fact, is the tension in your muscles. GTR 2 is hugely better than its predecessor in exactly the area that matters. [Oct 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Zelda virgins might well play The Wind Waker and deem it the best game they've ever encountered. To those of us who already have an idea of what to expect, though, it's 'merely' brilliant. [May 2003, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sokobond introduces complexity via level furniture that breaks bonds or lets you adjust the position of bonded atoms, but even the basic chambers provide ingenious challenges. Forget chemistry: it takes alchemy to produce a puzzle game as refined and smart as this.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Valve has taken something unscripted and dynamic, and seeded it with the right amount of narrative flavour, pacing and spectacle. [Christmas 2008, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It arrives fully formed, with a challenge and aesthetic that's beautifully intertwined and finely crafted. Joyous.