Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,620 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Rock Band 3
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,620 game reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The freedom of movement requires a new level of spatial imagination. Before Prince of Persia, platform games were like playing Tetris with only the blocks and bars. [Christmas 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The present console cycle is expected to last nearly a decade, and there will inevitably be developers advocating the need for more sophisticated tools. But just like Machu Picchu, the Pyramids and every other engineering marvel of antiquity, Uncharted 3 will stand as a reminder to future generations of gamers that enough problem-solving imagination can turn any old trowel into a magic wand.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Minor gripes aside, Rock Band with four players in the same room is quite something to be a part of, a game not only an evolution of the genre but of the social side of gaming itself. [Jan 2008, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A dazzling work of dank, abject horror that cements Miyazaki as one of the all-time greats. Sixteen months after PS4's launch, the new generation has finally begun. [May 2015, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Because there's an underlying subtlety and sophistication in the handling - and it's encouraging to see even minor damage and tyre wear affecting lap times - the compulsion to shave fractions off your records is always there. [June 2005, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that’s no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A work of progressive genius that hauls its staid genre up by the bootstraps and takes its place alongside the WOWs and Oblivions of this world. It's altogether too good to be true. [Christmas 2006, p.74]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There's a remarkable consistency to the design even as the levels gets steadily bolder until, after hovering vacuums, teleporters, and levers that freeze time, Simogo throws in a climactic boss battle that is as nerve-wracking as it is joyous. It's a compliment to say that Beat Sneak Bandit feels like a Rhythm Tengoku minigame taken to its logical extreme; it's constructed with a precision and a sense of mischief – and, in its final surprise, a generosity of spirit - that echoes the best work of the WarioWare team.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Threes is uncommonly sweet, though it can feel a little insubstantial.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rome: Total War is more compelling, more beautiful and more expansive than anything that has gone before. [Dec 2004, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Grid still offers the most on-track excitement (and better car damage), and the forthcoming GT5 already looks graphically superior, but anyone looking for the most rewarding console driving experience to date has found their ride.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [CD Projekt's] reputation as a studio of remarkable technical prowess has been tarnished a little, however noble its intentions. [July 2015, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No other beat 'em up developer is quite as willing to experiment with the form in a bid to stave off the moribundity that's gradually subsuming the genre. [Import - June 2003, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Awakening offers an excellent game of strategy, but it’s the relationship system that makes it.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The freedom of movement requires a new level of spatial imagination. Before Prince of Persia, platform games were like playing Tetris with only the blocks and bars. [Christmas 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This series offered some of the most memorable hours we spent holding a gamepad during 2012. [Feb 2013, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While a smattering of minor blemishes mean it shines a bit less brightly than 2014's other headline acts, it's not less essential for it. [Jan 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The overall impression Guitar Hero II leaves, particularly in light of its multiformat future and MTV's investment in Harmonix, is that it’s ceased to be a stand-alone game, and is now a platform in its own right. [Christmas 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Journey's real issue, if it has one, goes much deeper than that. It's a resolutely linear game in which your range of interactions is minimal. For some, that will make it a pretty but hollow novelty; boring, perhaps. But for those who play games to explore strange lands, see beautiful sights and to immerse themselves – for however brief a time – in a new world, Journey is perfect. And what's more, they'll find someone like them to share it with.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a potent return to form for Takahashi, then, a glowing comeback for the Japanese RPG, and an injection of creativity for some tired hardware. Xenoblade Chronicles manages to impress, enrich and, best of all, inspire wonder.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By polishing away blemishes, Rock Band 2 carefully improves on its predecessor. Those expecting the likes of music-making functionality perhaps aren’t quite on Rock Band’s wavelength, which is about performance, not creativity. [Dec 2008, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A rewarding stopgap for anyone after something old on something new. [July 2010, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Simogo’s greatest triumph, perhaps, is to intensify the potency of the written word. In using its text both as narrative and as geography – and through its impressively restrained use of illustration and sound – it generates an almost unrivalled sense of place.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Regardless of the amount of familiarity, though, Echoes is as solid and tangible as ever: the uncluttered HUD, the gentle rumble as Samus touches down from her unfaltering jumps, the ingeniously tucked-away power-ups, the smoothness and surety of movement. Its combat and exploration, if taken separately, can feel a little hollow and basic, but taken together they're still a powerful combination for a rewarding adventure. [Christmas 2004, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is brand new, yet it tastes vintage. Because it's nothing less than Capcom at its best in the genre it defines. [May 2010, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a rare delight to play a game with such consistency of vision, its art design, level architecture, rulesets, storylines and writing all working in lockstep.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It provides a revolution, but only inside its own idiosyncratic attitude and aesthetic. Sackboy remains Sackboy, and he won't convert those who didn't like the way he behaved in LBP. And for all the fascinating flexibility of its toolset, clearly this is still a framework: you can stamp a creation with your own style, but the overall vibe will ultimately be Media Molecule's. For those who are happy to embrace it, though, LBP2 represents a dazzling new opportunity for creating deep, diverse and ingenious play.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Vivid, smart and perhaps a little mocking, then, Infinity Gene, like Extreme, has exchanged the cold depths of space for the trippy vortex of some strange digital migraine: this classic isn't growing old with grace, but it's certainly continuing to evolve.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You’ll discover whether you’re a screamer or a yeller, a wide-striding groover or a bolt-upright pogo-er. This is a game that you can play sitting down, but you won’t. Not once. [Christmas 2005, p.104]
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The new control system may ultimately be an upgrade Samus Aran never really needed, but this is still the best – and most logical – Wii reissue from Nintendo to date.