Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,808 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Bayonetta 2
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2808 game reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Provides too little in the way of engaging structure behind its exemplary racing to make it more than a series of thrilling rides. [July 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A fairytale comeback. Extravagance was one of the signatures of the graphic adventure: extravagance to bring them in, and a cracking story well told to keep them.Both tenets of the Broken Sword series remain intact here, and that's all the devoted fans could have wanted. [Christmas 2003, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Smarter, faster pacing could have made all the difference. When it isn't intentionally hobbled, the combat is spectacular and unique. [Feb 2010, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As the more intimate title suggests, this may be as much about Croft's brand awareness in the face of unprecedented (and Uncharted) competition. [Oct 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beautifully detailed with impressive lighting, accurately modelled protagonists and a terrific sense of speed. A refreshing and captivating direction for the series. [Christmas 2003, p.115]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sunrise does nothing truly brilliant, but does it with such engaging raw excess that it’s hard not to be sucked in by its fairground attraction. [May 2005, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If Pocket Paradise makes you want to throw it against something, though, it’s only because it succeeds in making gardening compulsive. [Oct 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's the tutorials that stick in the mind: Skullgirls' real win is via Zaimont grasping that fighting games needn't be easier to play, but should be easier to understand.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While PixelJunk Shooter 2 may seem more like an expansion than a standalone game, there's no shortage of new ingredients to enrich what was already a lively concoction. [Apr 2011, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For experienced players, though, this is as fluid as Tekken has been for years, the tagging doing much to revitalise a combo system that, with its over-reliance on juggles and wall combos, was in danger of growing stale. But it's taken a 12-year-old mechanic to do that, and other games in this increasingly crowded genre boast a deeper level of mechanical complexity as well as a more generous welcome to newcomers.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The payoff is feeling like the Red Baron and Luke Skywalker rolled into one when you emerge from a tricky dogfight. [Oct 2015, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a game, it has problems. Indoor spaces will struggle to contain more than a few players (the maximum is seven) and with no rules governing conduct, smaller players are at a natural disadvantage if competition escalates. Still, as a statement of intent it is extraordinary, and feels characteristic of what Sportsfriends sets out to achieve – a realisation that simplicity and good company are the root ingredients of enjoying games, and that far from being decisive, visual sophistication might actually be entirely irrelevant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a delightfully risky experiment, and the end result is pure alchemy: the blending of two fiercely traditional genres into something both unique and entirely natural. [Apr 2009, p.125]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Atlus's surgery sim is in rude health. [July 2010, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Its prudence, that veil of simplicity masking a system of astonishing possibility and depth, makes it one of the purest fighting games on the market today.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its troop AI is better than that of "FEAR," and environmentally more aware than that of "Far Cry." [May 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whereas a more comprehensive reimagining of how Okami would work on DS could have resulted in a less ambitious, more polished game, Okamiden succeeds in preserving both the spirit and form of its forebear, and that makes in rather special indeed. [Mar 2011, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a dazzling experience, combining carefree spectacle with careful score attack, a game that's as concerned with its looks as the precision of its underlying mathematical systems. [JPN Import; June 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Blood Money feels only slightly closer to the series’ ideal of a gameworld that’s both complex and cogent, and is more accessible and entertaining with it. [July 2006, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Brutal Legend has the looks and the attitude, and a hefty chunk of original and engaging content to go with it. Whenever it goes near a stage, though, it begins to fall apart. [Dec 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Creatively, New Vegas gets almost everything right. Mechanically and technically, it's a tragedy. So, it's a simultaneously rewarding and frustrating game, the gulf between what it is and what it could be a sizeable stretch indeed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you were that kid who was pulled away from the TMNT cabinets by an angry mum, who couldn’t wait for Golden Axe to appear on a home console, and who played Streets Of Rage 2 over and over, Castle Crashers is for you. [Nov 2008, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One corker of an action game. Perhaps the biggest mention goes to the 'vo-cap' tech behind its extraordinary performances. [May 2009, p.88]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some may argue over what the series should have become, but what’s important is that it has made that tough decision for itself, and established a rock solid foundation for inevitable, now justified successors. [May 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It instantly shares the same atmosphere and pleasure as the original Sonic classics did 15 years ago, even if it does little to move them forward. [Christmas 2005, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The handling hasn’t evolved and a year on, with the masking novelty of the game’s tuning aspects worn off, it’s disappointingly limited and remote. And despite the increased choice and plot introduction the whole exercise can often feel soulless. [Christmas 2004, p.60]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Series veterans may find there's no individual mission that can compare to past highlights like the nails-down-a-blackboard dread of Return To The Cathedral or the emergent possibilities of Life Of The Party, but they remain admirably clever pieces of level design. [July 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The shift from WiiWare to 3DS, meanwhile, may not see Art Of Balance really benefiting very much from either the handheld's touchscreen or the developer's range of depth tricks, but it does add a generous suite of new levels - and it does raise the chances of a larger audience finally discovering this playful, wonderfully-calibrated puzzler.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It can't have the same gobsmacking impact as its inspiration, but this is a simple, engaging and occasionally baffling journey in its own right, with plenty of hooks to snare the newcomer.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Over the Top has tempered its obvious ambition with skill and understanding, and the result is a game that’s refreshingly quick to take flight.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This serves well as a third chapter, conscripting much of what has gone before while upping the testosterone and providing some glamorous distractions to pry your attention away from how little control you actually have over events. [Christmas 2006, p.81]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The improvements are largely cosmetic, with everything about this sequel – from the menus to the maps – more polished and user friendly, springing to life on Retina-equipped iOS devices with bursts of colour and character.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Having sacrificed racing integrity in "Double Dash" to side with social silliness, Nintendo has turned 180 degrees into an awkward halfway house. [May 2008, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Much like a summer movie blockbuster, Split Second offers thrills galore, but there's a hint of glossy superficiality to it, too...Yet there are few games in the genre that create quite so many sharp intakes of breath and instances of unintentionally barked profanity as this one, and sometimes that's what racing gaming is all about. [June 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Halo exhibits a single-minded focus that the modern FPS, with its choreographed set-pieces and thrilling scripted sequences, largely disregards. This is a game about the arc of a perfectly thrown grenade, a game about tense games of cat-and-mouse with foes as powerful as you, a game about constant improvisation with the tools at your disposal. It's a game that always feels tactical, and a game that – even now – has the capacity to surprise.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a game that, for all the intricacy of its systems and the charm of its painterly world, feels oddly empty.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Plenty of games have flourished around the slaughter, scale and destruction of war, but few have managed to realise a soldier’s role and worth - disposable, vulnerable, pivotal - as well as this. [Apr 2005, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As forgettable as the story mode is, this is a game that should be judged by the pleasure it can bring to a room full of gamers eager for furious arena combat and a splendid variety of team games. And judged by those criteria, it has few peers. [Apr 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s an introspective RPG not just in theme, but in the outlay of time and thought it asks of the player to make sense of what’s otherwise a cosmetically unfair challenge. It’s a work of art, but one on such a dauntingly high pillar that only the most dedicated will appreciate it to the full. [Christmas 2004, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Last Guardian doesn't just live up to its forebears' legacy, it goes further. Despite the callbacks to Fumito Ueda's previous works, it is a unique creation. Outside of indie experiments, we don't get to say that about modern videogames often enough.
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The handling hasn’t evolved and a year on, with the masking novelty of the game’s tuning aspects worn off, it’s disappointingly limited and remote. And despite the increased choice and plot introduction the whole exercise can often feel soulless. [Christmas 2004, p.60]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Blackbar tells a satisfying dystopian short story, one that invites you to engage directly with its censorship theme.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The overwhelming impression Los Angeles leaves is very slick, but it’s ultimately quite soulless. [Dec 2008, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A classy, inventive adventure with an absorbing story. [Dec 2014, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It may not satisfy armchair warmongers used to Supreme Commander’s intimidating depths, but RA3 never threatens to take itself that seriously, and nor would you want it to. [Christmas 2008, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    And while The Walking Dead had its share of technical problems, here they’re even worse, with lengthy loading times on 360 fracturing the pace and some several-second freezes completely killing the tension during fight scenes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is ballsy, brash, confident gaming at its best - a lesson in how games don't have to be perfect to be brilliant. [Christmas 2003, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A triumphant toolset attached to a decent stab at the karting genre
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Enslaved's greatest achievement is standing out in the crowded field of me- too, colour-sapped videogame apocalypses, serving as a vibrant oasis in the otherwise murky brown wastes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a feeling that never quite dissipates over the game’s core 15 missions, a sense of lean and focused game design which prizes the exhilarating tussle of conflict over long, drawn-out army building. [Mar 2009, p.86]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Pacific Rift certainly feels a more complete game than its predecessor, but the state of the art has moved on considerably since the original wowed at launch. [Dec 2008, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    SSX
    
In looking outside itself for inspiration, SSX has found a worthy infrastructure to establish an online community and culture. But this same approach has found the brand veering away from some of the fun and fireworks of yesteryear, leaving its more seductive silly side out in the cold.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    By the time you reach the end of Blacklist everything has grown so big and so explosive that you’re left exhausted but not entirely satisfied, and maybe after all that incoherent action you’ll recall the time when a single flashlight in Chaos Theory’s Panamanian bank made you hold your breath.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Last Light’s pacing – switching as it does between tight tunnels and wide-open abandoned spaces, explosive gunfights and creeping horror, stealth and socialising – could have felt disconnected in the hands of a less-talented developer. Instead it lends its world uncommon depth. The trade-off for a distinctive personality, of course, is that Last Light is occasionally unyielding, but the desire to see what waits in its next tunnel remains a powerful draw throughout.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though it occasionally goes pear-shaped as an adventure game due to the stinginess of its feedback, Botanicula is never less than a breath of fresh air.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Only a supreme apologist could suggest that such performance dips aren’t as damaging as they are disappointing, but conversely a realist should soon become capable of accepting them, momentary as they are. [Apr 2006, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There's a solid adventure title here, but it's spread thin over a densely written airport thriller. [Feb 2011, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether you're serious about climbing the leaderboards or just looking to race a teetering cupcake monster around on a pushbike, Hello Games' victory lap has you covered. May the instant restarts never falter. May the boosting never cease.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In a world of family-friendly games whose desire to appeal to all makes them feel wishy-washy, it's a welcome splash of colour. [Nov 2008, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Coming from the studio behind Wave Trip and Bad Hotel, Gentlemen’s sharp, stylish menus and app icon were always a given, but a conceptual curveball like this was hardly guaranteed to hit its target. That it does so emphatically is convincing proof that this Edinburgh studio is no one-trick pony.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Blood Money feels only slightly closer to the series’ ideal of a gameworld that’s both complex and cogent, and is more accessible and entertaining with it. [July 2006, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A frustrating step backwards for a studio that can do better. [July 2016, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those accustomed to the adult world of online PC gaming may have reason to sniff at the more streamlined play, but Pandemic has given consoles a whole new genre, pretty much perfectly formed... No game has ever felt quite so much like playing with Star Wars figures. [Nov 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is as good as you'll find on DSiWare at the moment, and it'll likely stay that way until Q-Games comes up with another mini-marvel. [Feb 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Double Fine’s adventure is confident and charming, the studio feeling its way to a comfortable mid-point between the desires of adventure-game fans and its own motivation to move the genre forward – even if only by a small increment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For your money, however, this is the best new MMOG since Guild Wars 2 and arguably the most feature complete an MMOG has ever been on launch.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Resistance Retribution might be shallow, but its good looks and refined controls lend a certain mesmerising pleasure to it nonetheless. [Apr 2009, p.124]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This game's focus is its singleplayer campaign, and it's an involving, dynamic, astonishing-looking 12-15 hour bloodbath. A good, old-fashioned bloodbath. [Dec 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that's no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A scary, vicious, visually progressive if rather hollow next-gen showcase that doesn’t outstay its welcome. If you want to spend a night or two in the company of the future of horror videogaming, you could do a lot worse. [Christmas 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A revitalisation of the very spirit that made the franchise a success. Finally, it’s time to stop asking where next for the series, and to start savouring where Project 8 has taken it. [Christmas 2006, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Nidhogg is not about lengthy stage lists, improvable online systems, fussy control mapping or AI. Nidhogg is about the purity of two friends on a couch duking it out as Daedelus’s moody dynamic electronica frames acrobatic displays of wits and reflexes. In that sense, it has no equal.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Let all the vision-obscuring dust settle and it transpires that Battlefield 4 is a more conservative sequel than we were led to expect.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's less motivation to persevere in erecting a monument to your skill when there's no one around to see it. [March 2015, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If all this wasn't enough, there's also an affecting story going on. [Oct 2016, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If you're looking for a sparklingly attractive shooter with a side order of slinky physics, this delivers the goods. But it's about as average as FPS gaming gets. [June 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may be formulaic, but that formula is still one of invention, surprise and excellence. [Jan 2005, p.87; JPN Import]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    GW2 offers an alternative, lighthearted take on a genre that can often feel po-faced. [May 2016, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Renegade Ops sees Avalanche successfully putting a thoroughly modern spin - and more than a few spin-outs - on well-worn mechanics. If you're reading, EA, we know just the team for that Strike reboot.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where Is My Heart? revels in simplicity, beauty and restraint, yet the experience tempers such qualities by proving challenging, infuriating and exhausting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While Rockstar made its millions capturing the grotesque allure of fantasy crime, every character in this me-too endeavor is simply grotesque. It has a taste for hot coffee, but only knows how to serve it straight. [Oct 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Memories of Mizuguchi's original may hold more value than anything offered here, making for an unusual proposition. Highly enjoyable as it is, Lumines II is tough to recommend. [Christmas 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It bears all the hallmarks of its maker. The future, it seems, is in safe hands. [Aug 2015, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a peculiar idea to grasp, but it's impossible to argue with how successfully Game Freak has taken one simple design decision and made it integral to movement, combat and puzzle solving. [Mar 2006, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For all of its little stumbles on the journey from Vita to PS4, and its odd mix of new ideas and an old world, Unfolded retains one of its progenitor's most vital ingredients: buckets and buckets of charm. [Nov 2015, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This lightness of touch, combined with instant restarts and a Trials-style checkpoint system, makes for an extremely moreish racer. [June 2016, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Gunplay is conveyed through some truly dazzling visual feedback and blare. But, once the smoke clears, it feels all too repetitive in terms of its deathmatch-style objectives. [Christmas 2005, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Nippon Ichi’s disregard for the cult of stagnated updates is at once exhilarating and unnerving. It’s exhilarating because it leaves the player wondering exactly where these craftsmen of the strategy minutiae will go next, and it’s unnerving because Phantom Brave’s reworking is a bridge too far for all but the most dedicated of videogame strategists. [Nov 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Everything is unabashedly cheerful... It's a shame that later levels begin to run out of steam, repeating tasks over and over as a contrivance for lengthening narrative. [Oct 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brutal and rather short, VVVVVV's also devious and darkly funny. It's a pedantic classic, and a game for watch-makers as much as speed-runners.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Unite doesn’t offer the kind of transformation at its higher levels that you might expect – the essential purpose is the same throughout: kill monsters, craft new shin pads out of dino-bladders, and swap your pig’s wings for a magician’s hat. Nonetheless, these simple motivations give way to a huge depth of execution which empowers and requires four players.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s not necessarily badly constructed, but in many ways it is badly intentioned, failing not just because of its conga-line of racial and sexual clichés, but because of the way it makes it a little bit easier to criticise videogaming as a hollow and sadistic pursuit. [Dec 2008, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With "Denied Ops" dropping the Conflict ball and "Call Of Duty 4"’s snappy splendour drowning any tactical sense, it’s a likeable and distracting continuation, but one that won’t be difficult to usurp. [Apr 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dual Destinies is an Ace Attorney game, all right, and that’s perhaps the best result anyone could have hoped for.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Its clumsiness of presentation and lack of explanation might be partly excused as aesthetic choices that enrich even as they frustrate. But perhaps its truest accolade is in returning the horror of survival itself to the survival horror genre.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Advanced Warfare is still Call of Duty, but it's more playful, knowing and refreshing than COD's been in years. [Christmas 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it feels dynamic for what is, essentially, an RPG of skill harvesting and exploiting, the end result is more about flexibility than exhilaration, more a colourfully-framed and extended session of rock-paper-scissors than any kind of rush. [June 2005, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game fumbles its potential with unanticipated incompetence. [Christmas 2007, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This first segment is potent. [March 2013, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game's angled view and coloured stacks mean that some of the best moments – cascading chains that ripple outwards as the landscape collapses in a shower of points – can sometimes be the result of luck instead of judgement.