Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,808 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Half-Life 2
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2808 game reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As a series, Civilization is being quietly surpassed. [Christmas 2016, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Shadowrun has too many cooks: it’s a heady broth initially, and the possibilities might seem unmatched, but ultimately it turns out to be limited fun. [Aug 2007, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Like its titular star, the game tends to transform, flipping from triumphant to frustrating, and back again.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Look at it one way, and it's a choking journey with unprecedented attention to unease and psychological horror, a game framed with unparalleled sophistication. From another angle, it's just a clunky PSone throwback, with all the design wit of a dodo. [Aug 2004, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The whole production’s chintzy Hollywood feel is just right, and there’s plenty to keep its target audience entertained. [Jan 2009, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Burn, Zombie, Burn’s serving of arcade chaos is instantly gratifying, if a tad trivial, and its nods to deadsploitation flicks should tickle those not yet tiring of Crypt Keeper chic. [Feb 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As efficiently and proficiently designed as Logan’s Shadow is, it’s unavoidably tied to the problems associated with action games of this type on PSP. [Feb 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Wideload has placed a welcome knee in the groin of the status quo, but by taking its subject too lightly it's also failed to turn an adventurous prototype into a durable production. [Christmas 2005, p.102]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Alluringly lurid, but ultimately disposable. [Dec 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Guitar Hero has one of the most intuitive and subtle control systems of any game, but here it becomes increasingly subservient to making the game – yes – rock hard, and for the average player will often descend into button-mashing. [Christmas 2007, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Playing against AI can throw up a challenge, but requires patience. Higher difficulties give the AI more time to think, but DTOL's real problem is its interface. It's simple to the point of crudity, but functionally it can be opaque and cluttered, making a reasonably complex game seem even more so while you're figuring out the rules. Get past that, and there's an acute psychological game to be played in DTOL, but it'll require time – and an extra player – to find it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As far as plot-twist clichés go, Downpour trots out all of the usual suspects.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    No one thing ruins Cavorite, but its pile of minor faults eventually overshadow its charisma. The levels can be ingenious, and Dr Cavor's quirky animations and great gimmick feel fresh, but the experience soon devolves into attrition rather than a challenge.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sir, You Are Being Hunted needs something more – a change in objective, focus or challenge to sustain engagement beyond the point when snatching teleporter pieces from robots on the coast loses its sense of mystery. As it is, it’s caught in an awkward hinterland of its own.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nintendo is famed for sprinkling around mechanics other developers would build entire games on, but here the effect is quite irritating. [Oct 2008, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It remains an early PS Move highlight, but one that can't boast the charm or accessibility of its Wii rivals, despite the improved tech. [Nov 2010, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The solid presentation and well-adjusted linear flow of the game make it simple, if mindless, fun. [Jan 2008, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Spider-Man 2 presents players with a city ripe for action and exploration, but once you swing down out of the clouds and take a closer look at the grubby streets and roads strewn with vehicles, you'll find little to pique your interest. [Sept 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The whole is far greater than the subtraction of its failures would suggest, and will attract many put off by the wonderfully absurd complexities of Nippon Ichi’s brazen coup. [July 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s a brave game that dares to weaken players in one way as it empowers them in another. Comcept may be wrong in thinking Monster Hunter would be better if it was just about hunting monsters, but Soul Sacrifice is courageous and thematically bold enough to distinguish itself from the clones that have followed in the wake of Capcom’s phenomenon. As with Inafune’s recurring criticisms of Japan, however, it proves repetition isn’t always the best way to make a point.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Tactics lacks what it needs the most, which is the seemingly limitless potential achieved by its predecessor. [Feb 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    What began as a celebration ends with nostalgia’s bubble being cruelly pricked.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Crisis Core gets arguably the most important thing right: its story is often expertly engineered and delivered, and despite the odd misstep (Genesis becomes especially tiresome as the game wears on) is some achievement in itself. [June 2008, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all Team Ninja's talk of keeping it more real, DOA5 is mostly business as usual. There are tweaks to the formula and aesthetic, but nothing too sacrilegious or enticing. It's disappointing, then, that this has little to offer over its forebear.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Argonaut's latest platformer is certainly a curious brew. You get the impression that loads of ideas have been thrown into the pot but, unfortunately, none of the weaker ones have been rejected. [Feb 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Look at it one way, and it's a choking journey with unprecedented attention to unease and psychological horror, a game framed with unparalleled sophistication. From another angle, it's just a clunky PSone throwback, with all the design wit of a dodo. [Aug 2004, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's an enjoyably twisted and often satisfying piece of fantasy, then, even though the reality of its more generic aspects poses a serious threat to its achievements. [JPN Import; Oct 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The concept at the core of Yosumin Live is robust, but it fails to hold up under extended play. Either Square Enix has happened upon a brilliant mechanic that has yet to fully bloom or one that it has been unable to sustain. The scant progression Yosumin has made in its transition from webgame to XBLA release indicates that perhaps it is the latter.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sadly, the early learning curve is far too shallow, while creative freedom is often illusory, with a single solution to many stages. Rovio does eventually loosen the reins, but the combination of rickety vehicles and unforgiving level design only heightens the frustration.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The game's great strength is the well-judged escalation of pace and scale. From your humble dungarees-and-pistol beginnings, the expansion of your squad means missions intensify from hit-and-run raids to large-scale onslaughts. And it is this, ultimately, which induces a sensation of swaggering brawn that allows the game's hiccups to be forgiven. [Oct 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine