Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,884 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Orange Box
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2884 game reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gun
    Why roam freely (when the game lets you, which is by no means always) when all that’s out there to find is an empty trek between jarring episodes of production-line gaming? [Christmas 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Not sensing the damage you're imparting and receiving makes skirmishes seem arbitrary (you'll rely on the HUD reporting your XP wins to know you've taken out enemies at long range), while explosions - in a game based on destruction - pack no punch. [Mar 2011, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nimble Quest is cute and compelling, but it’s also a cynical complication of a classic design.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Imagine building one of the most visually arresting games in recent memory, infusing the track design with genuine ingenuity, then having your work cruelly undermined by a learning curve shallower than a hill in Holland. RE is simply not challenging enough. [March 2003, p94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's perhaps because the title benefits from such a high production spend … that the average design and execution becomes more pronounced. [Mar 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This closing chapter of the Dynasty Warriors series is admittedly a neat full stop, an exhausting book-end for the enthusiasts, but it offers exactly the same baby step forwards as every other sequel-cum-update. [Feb 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In the end, though there is little average about either its elegant successes or its needless failings, between them they leave Lost Magic hanging in the balance. [June 2006, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Players are in danger of slipping in to a meditative trance from sustained focus on the undulating, serpentine ribbon of dirt that their vehicle consumes. Hypnotic, perhaps, but not especially compelling. [Dec 2008, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A strangely admirable bore: smart enough to take direct movement out of your hands, but not quite smart enough to find anything suitably enjoyable to replace it with. Never less than earnest, Doom Resurrection ignores the central lesson of much horror fiction: there are certain things you probably shouldn't do, even if you can.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Encounters feel needlessly protracted - born of a stubborn refusal to admit the game’s fundamental lack of content. The layout of scenery predetermines your every gambit before enemies blithely meander into your squad’s unlimited gunfire. [Apr 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Little Deviants' real problem is simple: it's not moreish, and its challenges fail to reveal the kinds of nuance on the second and third tries that will have you refining strategies and aiming to better scores. Without that incentive to return, you're unlikely to.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the air of brutality Space Marine tries to cultivate, it's ultimately defined by convenience; by linear levels where you follow the green lights of unlocked doors from one corridor to the next, while the gentle trickle of upgrades and new weapons does just enough to keep you playing. The result is sometimes casually enjoyable, but never vivid, or memorable, or truly involving.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    When directing death from above, Strike Team offers a glimpse at what might have been, but when it’s time to go loud, the whole thing collapses as limply as the enemies you’ve dropped.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a whisper of what the IP has to offer videogames rather than a realisation, and there's no disguise in the universe that can hide that. [Aug 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    FFXIII takes brave risks with the series’ foundations, but they ultimately create trembling fractures throughout the entire edifice, that robust battle system unable to support the weight of an entire world. Final Fantasy games are always an investment. This time, the returns are questionable.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Lucid is carrying on the spirit of its PGR days with this sim-arcade hybrid, but where Bizarre Creations’ driving games pushed their platforms’ boundaries, 2K Drive is incapable of breaking through the limitations of iOS.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At release, it offers a staggeringly beautiful world filled with unfinished systems, ugly cash grabs, and a string of missed opportunities. [Jan 2014, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A whole lot better on phones than it is on 3DS. [July 2015, p.115]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Many titles are likened to "Devil May Cry," but Van Helsing appropriates that game's structure with such brazen thoroughness that it might be seen as this generation's Great Giana Sisters. [July 2004, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Astro Boy is a light cartoon romp sure to please young admirers of the character, but it fails to offer the depth required to engage a broader demographic. [May 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nearly all enemy behaviour consists of direct charges, calling on the butt of your gun as frequently as its barrel. While it’s undeniably intense, it soon becomes apparent that this intensity is the only string on the designers’ banjo, plucked with increasingly feverish rapidity instead of ever-changing chords. [Nov 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rarely does dying feel like the player's fault and, in typical "Sonic Adventure" fashion, the best bits are when you find that the majority of control has been taken away from you, and you're flung around the world at escape velocity. [Mar 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Did a purse-holder at Activision one day grapple fruitlessly with the last game's control system and scrawl in their subsequent notes “Make the next one so that I can play it”? Speculation aside, someone sure messed-up Spider-Man. [Dec 2005, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nearly all enemy behaviour consists of direct charges, calling on the butt of your gun as frequently as its barrel. While it's undeniably intense, it soon becomes apparent that this intensity is the only string on the designers' banjo, plucked with increasingly feverish rapidity instead of ever-changing chords. [Nov 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Free-to-play works when you earn the trust of your players over time, but RedLynx instead prods you at every opportunity to remind you that you haven’t paid for your game yet. Even so, once dredged from beneath the cloying mass of microtransactions that suffocate it, Trials Frontier isn’t a bad game as such. It is, however, a very bad Trials game.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's often unclear whether or not your shots are hitting, which inclines you to blunder out from your cover and head for close quarters - which in turn destroys the developer's intention of forcing a tactical, cautious approach. [Nov 2003, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Yes, you really do feel in chargeof steering, but when the amount of speed put into a tight bend is dictated by the game, not the player, that feeling only delivers so much. [Christmas 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In-app purchases, however, are handled with more nuance and kept pleasingly out of sight.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    So despite the winner podiums and big sponsorship contracts and – yes – even the hours you'll spend in this askew universe, Grand Prix Story feels more like deja vu than entertainment. The formula is rapidly palling.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The dozens of pre-prepared puzzles can be fiendish enough in themselves, but the option of dragging modifier icons on to tiles, changing the pattern with which they flip, enables high scores just as surely as it does enormous headaches. [June 2007, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine

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