Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,628 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 LittleBigPlanet
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,628 game reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Housemarque's adventure wears its ambitions so openly that the comparison is inevitable. By no means a classic on those terms, Outland is nonetheless a well-executed game that - hopefully - lays the groundwork for future iteration upon its central ideas.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Over-familiarity and stagnation has bred a cancerous apathy among gaming's cognoscenti. FFX-2, like it or not, gives players a reason to take notice again. [Jan 2004, p.98]
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A hybrid game of mixed success, Legacy reconciles Ace Combat's past and present while failing to offer enough diversity and features to make the results essential.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With both real-time and turn-based flavours of haphazard carnage on offer, Glitch Tank is willing to mess with your brain at a variety of speeds. Michael Brough's certainly given iPad owners something to think about, then – even if few will have the patience and foresight to feel truly comfortable on this strange new playing field.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a puzzle-platform game pared down to its base essentials, with a sweet, simple tale and an artfully imagined world wrapped around that core. [July 2013, p.122]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game never judges you, offering no morality system despite the frequent dilemmas and difficult choices its systems organically generate. But it certainly tests you. This is as close as we’ve come to putting our lazily daydreamed zombie survival plans into effect.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game is full of charm, from the easily-distinguishable block types and hero in dressing gown, to the sequences that detail the game’s story and a delicate hint mode. [July 2007, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The overwhelming impression Los Angeles leaves is very slick, but it’s ultimately quite soulless. [Dec 2008, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is a game that may not leave you full, but it'll taste pretty sweet while it lasts.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The battles, meanwhile, are engaging despite their simplicity, and it's beautiful to watch each turn play out. [May 2010, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s a fantastic combo system at Killer Instinct’s core, but right now it feels like half a game – one full of promise, certainly, but not an especially next-gen one either. The cascade of particles may not be enough to retain player interest until the rest of the game arrives.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You'll soon learn the groove: shoot, dodge, shoot, dodge. It should get tedious, but it doesn't. P.N.03 rewards skill above all else and mastery brings huge satisfaction. Grace under fire has rarely been done better. [June 2003, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is a game that may not leave you full, but it'll taste pretty sweet while it lasts.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Relic seems afraid to let any of its ideas meaningfully vary your experience, in case the result isn’t as satisfying as the scenario it has clearly tested so well. [Apr 2009, p.119]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's not as much depth as Tetris or Puyo Puyo, but there's not much that disappoints about Bombastic apart from a rather lacklustre platform game that's been bolted on. The deeply involving puzzle mechanics brilliantly build on the foundations laid down by Devil Dice. [Christmas 2003, p.124]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Its game may rarely do anything you haven’t seen done better elsewhere, but the developer knots a slew of disparate elements together with no little skill, leaving the whole feeling irresistibly fresh.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Polyphony has produced a handling and physics model that is unmatched by any other racer, but failed to provide AI competition capable of showcasing it to its fullest.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Add the odd cruelly-placed save point, and you've got an adventure that occasionally explores the agonies, as well as the ecstasies, of gaming's past. At least it's honest.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Driver has escaped near-death with a captivating and colourful return, and one where everything from systems to cinematics is of a quality build. As surprises go, it's a juggernaut. [Apr 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's an attractive game, too, its painterly art style and creative enemy design sullied only by the occasional drop in performance and that persistently unhelpful camera. If wrestling with the right analogue stick is no one's idea of a good time, such frustrations are worth enduring for a daring and sometimes exhilarating boss rush.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Series veterans may find there's no individual mission that can compare to past highlights like the nails-down-a-blackboard dread of Return To The Cathedral or the emergent possibilities of Life Of The Party, but they remain admirably clever pieces of level design. [July 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Undisputed can be complex one moment and crude the next, the dominant ‘full mount’ position (the holy grail of ground-and-pound fighters) far too achievable against even experienced opposition.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When you're playing a Ninja Gaiden game and not dying until the eighth chapter, it doesn't bode well for the future of the series as we know it. Oh, and the camera's still rubbish. [Nov 2009, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tropico is as vibrant and capricious as the setting, and never dry or formulaic in the way that other management games can tend to be. [Christmas 2009, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Made in Wario confidently sticks two fingers up at an industry that seems to have lost its sense of humour … it displays a refreshing intertextuality that manages to poke fun at and celebrate videogames. [June 2003, p. 103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s an introspective RPG not just in theme, but in the outlay of time and thought it asks of the player to make sense of what’s otherwise a cosmetically unfair challenge. It’s a work of art, but one on such a dauntingly high pillar that only the most dedicated will appreciate it to the full. [Christmas 2004, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game occasionally drags, arguably due to representing the bleakness of its environment and the challenges of existing within it a little too keenly. Autosave points are few and far between, which means that on anything above normal difficulty your frequent restarts will result in much repetition. Likewise, I Am Alive's platforming is occasionally cumbersome and inexact. But nevertheless this game offers a journey worth charting, one of physics, social decline and welcome terror in a market overrun by zombies.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A lender and borrower with a few ideas of its own, Kami Retro's not quite perfect, but is worth a hundred more generic clones.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Crimson Skies really comes to life online. Up to 16 players can duke it out in the skies and the dogfights are terrific. This is better than you'd ever have expected. [Christmas 2003, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Singleplayer is weak - despite well-worked tutorial and mission modes it always feels like target practice for combat with friends - and the lack of online support disappoints. But despite a potentially hazardous dimensional switch, it remains as appealing a way of antagonising your friends as ever. [Dec 2003, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Whereas our appetite for entertainment is such that we happily consume similar amusements again and again, we have to ask if we really need to learn these lessons twice. [Sept 2007, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Through the crush of it all, Viewtiful Joe's pedigree for fusing entertainment and quality is clearly visible throughout the chaos, even if it doesn't necessarily shine. [Dec 2005, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The beginning is a sensible place to start, but rest assured, it gets much, much better. [Feb 2009, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Siren's grand ideas are to be applauded, but savouring them takes effort. If you can invest the time, and look away in all the right places - such as the genre's trademarks of outrageously bad combat and dogsbody objectives - then there's a uniquely suffocating horror experience waiting to be survived. [Mar 2004, p.99]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fundamentally, it's hard to bear a grudge against a game with such generosity of spirit and pleasant delivery. But having tangled with mythical sea beasts and alternate Londons, isn't it time for Layton to solve the greatest mystery of all: where does he go next.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though generous with its ideas, Flexile can't quite make them stretch across 60 levels, and while the controls are as good as virtual buttons can be, some challenges are too fiddly to be fun, with a curious fussiness when it comes to triggering your blob's powers. Even so, this is a bright and attractive puzzler that is, thankfully, far smarter than its title would suggest.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Messy but oddly mesmeric, Bad Hotel is perhaps more successful as a curious plaything than a game, but it's no less essential for that.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At its worst, however, Galaxies has some big problems. The biggest is that it is remarkably fond of spawning enemies behind your ship too quickly for you to move away... It can be incredibly annoying – enough, in fact, to slightly taint the whole experience. [Feb 2008, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s not even surprising,? ?despite all? ?this,? ?that Resident Evil? ?5? ?is a good game.? The surprising,? ?and sad,? ?thing about? ?Resident Evil? ?5? ?is that it feels old.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Next Encounter is one of the grandest and busiest console battlefields yet created. This is a spiritual update to Space Invaders, a one-trick pony that kicks harder than most FPS thoroughbreds, making the "Medal of Honour" series seem like a vain diva by comparison. [June 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As an open-world game, Second Son feels emaciated. There’s little to do in the way of side missions, and what is here becomes repetitive, unlikely to sustain interest beyond a single playthrough. Approach it as an action game that just happens to be set in a nonlinear environment and it makes more sense, but its not-inconsiderable achievements take effort to uncover.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite its paucity of detail, Jade Empire is still many, many things, some are fine and some poor, but for a game to contain so much is a testament to its breadth, and the reason why it'll remain a worthwhile expedition for many. [June 2005, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The only black mark is for the controls: the on-screen buttons feel reasonably responsive most of the time, but you'll experience a definite stickiness when things heat up.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For dedicated Ghosts GRAW 2 is a no-brainer. For the rest of us it's just the exact game "Advanced Warfighter" should have been and would have beeen if the clock wasn't watching; Ubisoft rewriting history and charging us twice for the privilege. [May 2007, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It refreshes with its purity of purpose and ambition, even if, as a mechanising of the grieving process, it’s a game few will wish to return to once completed.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ubisoft has taken a flawed game of boundless promise, destroyed some (but not all) of its appeal, fixed some (but not enough) of its problems, and jeopardised the whole endeavour by making the same mistake twice and rushing it to market before it was steady on its feet. Prince of Persia is strong and supple enough to survive this with many of its immense virtues intact. But it deserved so much better. [Christmas 2004, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a game that’s as riotously entertaining as it is viciously random... It’s gleeful automobile slapstick, but not for anyone who values skill and achievement more than taking a wrecking ball to their opponents’ racing lines. [Dec 2005, p.114]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In taking away direct control Miniland Mayhem has intensified the appeal to players' protective instinct which exists at the heart of the series. [Jan 2011, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The single-player campaign is fast-paced if rather unforgiving on occasion, and the online community is refreshingly vibrant given the game's steep learning curve. Recollection's only real problems exist in the form of a handful of irritating crash bugs and server disconnects, along with an unwelcome over-eagerness to drive you towards in-app purchases as you seek to bolster your sickly starter deck.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Epic Mickey may not always be entirely satisfying to play, but it's still enormously interesting to wander around with an eye open for the detailing. [Jan 2011, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's the tutorials that stick in the mind: Skullgirls' real win is via Zaimont grasping that fighting games needn't be easier to play, but should be easier to understand.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It hangs together because its distinct strands feed into one another just enough, even if that relationship is as crude as a dialogue tree leading to you gaining a stat-altering card that you can play during the campaign phase.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Conan is a genuine surprise. It’s not innovative in its entirety, but it does almost as much as it can with the central conceit, and thus proves one of the better examples of the hack’n’slash genre. [Dec 2007, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For its dramatic and cinematic flair, its lovingly crafted chaotic destruction and above all its network of interconnected personalities, it's an adventure that shouldn't be missed. [JPN Import; June 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What’s left is, while smartly streamlined, a thoroughly orthodox game within a well-established type, a niche within a niche that’s getting smaller all the time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If some activities are variants on familiar parlour games, they’re enlivened by creative twists and side objectives, while others are brimming with invention.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Magic Pengel isn't, by any stretch of the imagination, a rounded and satisfying videogame. But it is, without question, a rounded and satisfying stretch of the imagination. [Nov 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you share director Ragnar Tornquist's view that being engaged in dialogue is a form of gameplay, then there's a richness here that few other titles have the ability or luxury to create. [June 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels more like a yearly update than a sequel, a new campaign with old multiplayer. The game isn't distinct from its predecessors in any important way, and fatigue sets in quicker than before. [Jan 2011, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is a game you'll complete, chuckle at and show off. [Sept 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Its keen sense of drama is as authentic as it is exhilarating: arcing a 40-yard free-kick around the wall and into the top corner in the last-minute of a cup final is as thrilling a moment as you'll witness in any FIFA match. It's hardly the beautiful game – its visuals are perfunctory at best – but Simon Read's creation smartly captures the capitalism, the artistry and the sheer, glorious unpredictability of its subject.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It looks great, and the boosting system means that, as a time-trial game, it's fantastic. If your progress wasn't so easily sabotaged by a thoughtless collision, it would be a fantastic racer, too. [June 2004, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An incredibly solid universe with barely a technical glitch to be found, but it’s soulless and almost bereft of plot or character. This is a sandbox game that’s begging for a purpose. [March 2005, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels more like a yearly update than a sequel, a new campaign with old multiplayer. The game isn't distinct from its predecessors in any important way, and fatigue sets in quicker than before. [Jan 2011, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Zombie Gunship obviously has its influences, but it works them into something surprising: a slow-mo high-score shooter, a grainy panorama of survival horrors, and a greater sense of an undead horde than the rest of the App Store's zombie shooters put together.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's undeniably a one-trick pony, then, but it's a good trick, performed with flair and polish. Those inclined to correct grammatical howlers in friends' Facebook missives will find this a far less confrontational way of sating their inner pedant.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Snowblind never truly escapes the feeling of being a well-dressed, derivative run’n’gun shooter, it never fails to get the running and gunning right, and in that respect, at least, it’s a sound success. [March 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels more like a yearly update than a sequel, a new campaign with old multiplayer. The game isn't distinct from its predecessors in any important way, and fatigue sets in quicker than before. [Jan 2011, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    We hate its impotence, its utter lack of a scare beyond an aversion to getting shot. And with its market-led features and Skinner-box mechanics, we hate that a series that began as a lesson in horror – of the B-movie kind, admittedly – now feels so afraid of the competition.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If Rock of Ages eventually runs out of variety, it never runs out of charm. The game has a magnificent sense of momentum throughout, tugging you downhill towards the enemy's gates and upwards through the strata of Western culture. It is an oddball offering in every sense.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Opoona has enough character that, combined with its innovative combat and leisurely pace through an interesting world, it is comfortably its own experience. [June 2008, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Masterful controls aside, Corruption sees Retro lost for a while, like Samus, down some mystifying and convoluted dead-end of its own making, populating a universe that should have stayed desolate and dead. [Nov 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fast, engrossing and perfectly attuned to the needs of a handheld, Lunar Knights addresses the previous games’ failings without feeling like a retreat, providing refinement without too much dilution. [Apr 2007, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The most satisfying stages give you a generous toolset with which to experiment, but one too many involves painstaking repositioning of a few items.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While you won't necessarily win without some loyal subjects from your friends list, there's a deceptive amount of fun you can have while trying. [Oct 2009, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At the halfway mark, Chains is so tremendous, striking an almost perfect beat of difficulty spikes, weapon upgrades and stupendous visual reveals, that you have to question its endurance. And, sadly, it flounders right on cue. [Apr 2008, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The revelatory finale will leave you winded, but also heartened by Krillbite’s assertion that firstperson horror needn’t be confined by crumbling walls and straitjackets.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As a reinvention it's a resounding success, and there are no pretenders to its comprehensiveness [May 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is restless and, in the context of Clank’s overalls story, incoherent. But it’s also vibrantly diverse. [Sept 2008, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Uprising may not break any new ground in a genre that is arguably an endangered species, but it does a good job of breathing life into the dying breed. It's a reminder that an artist's eye, when met by a designer's understanding of modern tastes, can revitalise a struggling brand and make the old feel new again.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For all its successes, the fact remains that even after significant delays, what's been delivered is far from finished. [Dec 2014, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It only betrays itself completely once – in a dismally conventional boss battle around halfway through – though at times Spartan threatens to become routine, it never does, thanks to its strong character, handsome looks and sheer, irrepressible verve. [Nov 2005, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Maddening moments are far enough between to be only a minor blemish on an otherwise fantastic portable action game. [Jan 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Boss fights aside, Ubosoft's consideration for its subject matter throughout is striking. [Sept 2014, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a shame that Forza's much-vaunted AI tech proves an ill fit for open-world racing. [Dec 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In terms of distilling the core Civilization experience from PC to handheld, this is almost as victorious as the PC-to-console iterations. [Oct 2008, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Core game play remains largely undeveloped from Symphony Of The Night, and, despite the additions, is aspirational rather than inspirational. It’s certainly the best handheld Castlevania game, but Igarashi’s team is too dedicated to the framework he masterminded for this to be anything innovatory. [Nov 2005, p.108]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Blood Money feels only slightly closer to the series’ ideal of a gameworld that’s both complex and cogent, and is more accessible and entertaining with it. [July 2006, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you've come this far on Lee's journey, Around Every Corner's ending will make the final chapter a near essential purchase: not just to see how this supposedly reactive, in part player-authored story ends, but to see if Telltale really can pull it off.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a game that feels like bits of lots of other games you've played before, but not in this order, rarely with such a sure-footed framework and never presented with such a crisp gloss of cartoon-quality presentation; and it's all bunched up together more tightly and enjoyably than in Sly 2. [Dec 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's a great deal of satisfaction in finding the right combination of fighters and feeling the curve of a battle until you hit the tagging sweet spot. [Mar 2011, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While the overall blandness means Galactrix is unlikely to truly thrill many people, it also means that it won’t exclude anyone either, and the ever-reliable pattern-spotting blends with the steady trickle of meaningless rewards to exert a pull on its audience that is truly Pavlovian. [Apr 2009, p.125]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The picaresque form allows the levels to function as discreet puzzles rather than as parts of a story arc: the objective remains pure and always the same. The obstacles and methods open to you are what change, and it's in these areas that Contracts has both expanded and improved. [June 2004, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's an unexpected clarity to solo play that's lost amid the tumult of human competition, but what's never obscured – and what stands as its great accomplishment – is its fond and intricate celebration of all things PlayStation.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    One of the most artistically accomplished games to have emerged from an independent studio, Trine 2 has enough minor tweaks and new things to see to draw you back into its playground. It's a short, sweet, occasionally imperfect little treat.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For all its delightful art and writing, the cold logic in its Gordian design is unrelenting. [Sept 2014, p.115]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Persistent players will find it to be one of the best multiplayer experiences on PSP. [Dec 2007, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With the FPS realm being crushingly overpopulated, and its upper class becoming so terrifyingly demanding and particular, Pariah’s solidity isn’t enough to allow it entry into the genre’s gentry. [June 2005, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The slower, more deliberate pace and the hefty fine levied by missed throws and counters may initially confuse those expecting Guilty Fear in a new set of clothes, but ultimately provides a smoother learning curve and a more welcoming experience for new players. [Sept 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels like one more step in the right direction for Daedalic, then, and while it’s still in dire need of some truly iconic and unforgettable cast members to define and flesh out its solid handle on the genre, Memoria is another worthwhile investment for both developer and player.