Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,884 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Bloodborne
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2884 game reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Spider-Man 2 presents players with a city ripe for action and exploration, but once you swing down out of the clouds and take a closer look at the grubby streets and roads strewn with vehicles, you'll find little to pique your interest. [Sept 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The whole is far greater than the subtraction of its failures would suggest, and will attract many put off by the wonderfully absurd complexities of Nippon Ichi’s brazen coup. [July 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s a brave game that dares to weaken players in one way as it empowers them in another. Comcept may be wrong in thinking Monster Hunter would be better if it was just about hunting monsters, but Soul Sacrifice is courageous and thematically bold enough to distinguish itself from the clones that have followed in the wake of Capcom’s phenomenon. As with Inafune’s recurring criticisms of Japan, however, it proves repetition isn’t always the best way to make a point.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Tactics lacks what it needs the most, which is the seemingly limitless potential achieved by its predecessor. [Feb 2008, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    What began as a celebration ends with nostalgia’s bubble being cruelly pricked.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Crisis Core gets arguably the most important thing right: its story is often expertly engineered and delivered, and despite the odd misstep (Genesis becomes especially tiresome as the game wears on) is some achievement in itself. [June 2008, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all Team Ninja's talk of keeping it more real, DOA5 is mostly business as usual. There are tweaks to the formula and aesthetic, but nothing too sacrilegious or enticing. It's disappointing, then, that this has little to offer over its forebear.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Argonaut's latest platformer is certainly a curious brew. You get the impression that loads of ideas have been thrown into the pot but, unfortunately, none of the weaker ones have been rejected. [Feb 2004, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Look at it one way, and it's a choking journey with unprecedented attention to unease and psychological horror, a game framed with unparalleled sophistication. From another angle, it's just a clunky PSone throwback, with all the design wit of a dodo. [Aug 2004, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's an enjoyably twisted and often satisfying piece of fantasy, then, even though the reality of its more generic aspects poses a serious threat to its achievements. [JPN Import; Oct 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The concept at the core of Yosumin Live is robust, but it fails to hold up under extended play. Either Square Enix has happened upon a brilliant mechanic that has yet to fully bloom or one that it has been unable to sustain. The scant progression Yosumin has made in its transition from webgame to XBLA release indicates that perhaps it is the latter.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sadly, the early learning curve is far too shallow, while creative freedom is often illusory, with a single solution to many stages. Rovio does eventually loosen the reins, but the combination of rickety vehicles and unforgiving level design only heightens the frustration.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The game's great strength is the well-judged escalation of pace and scale. From your humble dungarees-and-pistol beginnings, the expansion of your squad means missions intensify from hit-and-run raids to large-scale onslaughts. And it is this, ultimately, which induces a sensation of swaggering brawn that allows the game's hiccups to be forgiven. [Oct 2003, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There’s no question that DUB Edition can be pleasurable, especially in the multiplayer games, but the Career mode too often feels like graft. There are tournaments, one-off street races and ‘special’ events, but each individual race feels much the same as the last. [June 2005, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Naturally, it isn’t as attractive as its console cousin, though zoom down to eye level during its majestic sunsets and the shanties belted out by your crew make for a reasonable facsimile of the console game.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Were it not for its creative direction's admirable job of filling in its patchy mechanics' gaps it would be entirely skippable. With those gaps filled it's a charming, if flawed, achievement. [June 2006, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The game's second half descends into a fiasco...One thing's for certain: if there's a great action game in Infamous 2, no one's actually built it yet.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Aged environments and models are wheeled out and the interface is surprisingly clunky and obtrusive. There is a solid game here to prop it up, but it's indicative of the no-frills production that even the robotic announcer seems to be phoning in its performance. [May 2004, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Resistance Retribution might be shallow, but its good looks and refined controls lend a certain mesmerising pleasure to it nonetheless. [Apr 2009, p.124]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite its reheated fantasy trappings and formulaic design principles, it also remains surprisingly easy to get hooked on the steady dopamine hit of each fresh loot acquisition and the rhythm of the game's combat pulse.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The experience certainly isn’t awful, but nor is it in any way exceptional – and up against the accomplished competition, that simply won’t be good enough. [June 2007, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Something it achieves more successfully is the frustration of sensory impairment. [Oct 2015, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The illusion of epic-scale warfare remains a powerful and entertaining one, broken most significantly by the player’s need to avoid overexposing themselves to its fundamentally tedious nature. [Feb 2007, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Area 51 is entirely without inspiration, an exercise in slick, crowd-pleasing cookie-cutter cliché from the Jerry Bruckheimer school of entertainment manufacture. It is absolutely not bad, almost never broken, and usually a good deal of fun. [July 2005, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For all Raven's efforts with temporal gimmicks, this is a game which is stuck in the FPS past – but, perversely, in its gun-metal and gore, in its most archaic respects, Raven proves it can just about stand the test of time.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There’s a lot of charm to Fetch, and this is as charmingly produced as anything on iOS, but there’s little adventure or arcade substance beneath its surface.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though its essential concept is well worn, Ninjatown is sturdily designed and offers a commendably flexible set of strategies for survival against the hordes. [Christmas 2008, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There are nice touches – cockroaches that scatter under your flashlight, the occasional puzzle, effective cutscenes – but there is little that you won’t have found implemented in a vastly more satisfactory form elsewhere. [May 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The pacing, thanks to a combination of necessary haste and the weakness of your divided squad members, feels more akin to a corridor shooter; there's a constant sensation of feeling harried and hemmed in. [Oct 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's perhaps because the title benefits from such a high production spend, in fact, that the average design and execution becomes more pronounced. [Mar 2004]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Once the novelty of the new setting and storylines has worn off - there's little genuine inovation to hold your interest. [July 2004, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Did a purse-holder at Activision one day grapple fruitlessly with the last game's control system and scrawl in their subsequent notes "Make the next one so that I can play it"? Speculation aside, someone sure messed-up Spider-Man. [Dec 2005, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While Neversoft's course design holds up, its objectives sadly don't; setting high scores is as thrilling and rewarding as ever, but we're less forgiving of being asked to collect five objects dotted around a level without a right-stick camera than we were at the turn of the millennium.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is more than just a cynical cash-in conversion, but in pitching itself as a kind of '1.5' iteration it's never clear if the game is a necessity or a distraction for devotees of the Kingdom Hearts universe. For all but the most ardent follower, its off-target execution will imply the latter. [Feb 2005, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sadly, encounters with enemy AI - particularly in combat - are by far the weakest link in an otherwise enjoyable effort. [Apr 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On retreading the levels enemy attacks become predictable puppet shows, with mad-eyed soldiers lining up to get killed exactly where they did many times before. It's the kind of repetition more commonly associated with lightgun games these days. [Christmas 2003, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's a great deal of fun for the first 20 minutes, but once you've mastered your ships and applied your favourite skull decals, there's little to keep you hooked. [Tested with Oculus Rift; June 2016, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While Monster Madness does much to scratch the co-op itch, and offers some titillating online modes, it sullies it with patchy execution and a series of poor design choices. [Sept 2007, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The only area in which the game satisfyingly realises the twisted ideas is in mental ailments. [July 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    By the second of third level you’ll feel that Get Even has shown you everything it has. The odd moment of redemption comes with an excellent boss here, a Taito in-joke there, and the invaders. [Feb 2009, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The laser-like focus on the personal side of management is to the exclusion of all else – the lack of a match engine is one thing, but there's no detail whatsoever to the football your team is playing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The net result is a product that can't be faulted on its accessibility, but has less subtlety than ever with which to hide the inherently, and sometimes unrelentingly, mechanical process that caring for your sims represents. [Mar 2007, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Enormous potential. However, those moments where you feel justice being done are few, and a brave mess is still, after all, a mess. [Apr 2004, p.104]
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s during its harder moments that Crimson Dragon pushes you away. A combination of heavy handling and poor communication make you feel hoodwinked rather than outmatched, and the ability to buy continues with Gems you’ve purchased with real money sullies the challenge. It’s a good job that the Zen gardens of those easier levels are always there to return to.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For the promising set-up, it collapses in the heat of battle. Nearly a full third of the PSP’s screen is filled by a clumsy status display, clipping the peripheral vision that would have been so useful in the chaos of a Dynasty scrum. [Feb 2005, p.79]
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With little to differentiate fighters beyond base levels of aggression, symmetrical faces and notions of characters they’re meant to represent, it doesn’t take too long for Balboa to flag, or indeed trudge to an unceremonious end. [Mar 2007, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game’s unique honour system (requiring you to tag and then kill enemies in exchange for upgrades) proves largely irrelevant, and in the heat of battle, toggling your firstperson view and wrestling with the analogue nub to track fast-moving targets proves frustrating and unwieldy. [Jan 2008, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The game is its own worst enemy, as its fully featured hands-on action never quite sits comfortably with roleplaying combat. [July 2010, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gun
    Why roam freely (when the game lets you, which is by no means always) when all that’s out there to find is an empty trek between jarring episodes of production-line gaming? [Christmas 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's certainly got strong production in its favour, but needs better direction - what's been gained in grunt and intensity has been lost in terms of poise and refinement, resulting in an uncomfortable middle ground between truly outrageous action and the disciplined choreography of the original. [Jan 2007, p.74]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Getting monkey into position, and camera into position behind him, in time to make your desperate dash for a whirling mechanism has everything to do with the old-school frustrations of instant-death gaming and nothing to do with the effortless application of skill that the first game delivered so appealingly. [Feb 2006, p.91]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What felt greedy before is on yet more dubious ground here - the feeling of tactical scope missing from the singleplayer campaign is largely due to Square Enix cutting out the goods to sell at a later date. [Oct 2009, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a perfectly serviceable adventure that you’ll play through with few frustrations, but will likely have forgotten by the following morning. Ratchet and Clank’s story ends, then, not with a bang, but with a half-hearted shrug.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sadly, encounters with enemy AI - particularly in combat - are by far the weakest link in an otherwise enjoyable effort. [Apr 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Power Tennis has depth only insofar as there's a great deal to do – medals to win, records to beat and tournament trophies to hold aloft – but all the frills and gimmicks overcomplicate something that wasn't broken in the first place. [Jan 2005, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It seems Buena Vista has gone from making lacklustre titles out of much-loved franchises to making a reasonable game from the coldest of franchises. [Mar 2007, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Saboteur is an awesome display of clichés, stereotypes, shortcuts and failures in logic. [Jan 2010, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In practice, Tokobot offers so little to challenge either the reflexes or the mind that it boils down to one long, plodding, gentle ushering from one side of a large, mostly vacant level to the other, with nothing to reward self-determined exploration and an identical series of Pavlovian cues to let the player know that it’s time to switch to the next formation. [Feb 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Polish and beauty is the essence of ULALA, and while this conversion is superb, it's simply not made for the small screen. It's large, loud and beautiful, and that's how it should be. [Oct 2003, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Handling is the biggest setback here. In a sport where cars spend most of their time dancing on tarmac, gravel and snow there is very little feeling of cadence conveyed in Sega Rosso's game. Ultimately, your money could be better spent on something else. [March 2003, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While Monster Madness does much to scratch the co-op itch, and offers some titillating online modes, it sullies it with patchy execution and a series of poor design choices. [Sept 2007, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The thrills are just too short-lived, and it simply doesn't stand up as a more boisterous alternative to the razor-sharp focus and freshness of "Project 8" on 360. [Jan 2007, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's too easy and basic for adults and likely too mellow for children drawn in by its bubbly aesthetic. It's a shame, because Okabu's is a quietly charismatic world, one destined to be overlooked thanks to its grind of an opener and failure to match its visual vigour with mechanics that haven't been used better elsewhere.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    After the interesting and confident debut of The Suffering last year, Ties That Bind remains a straightforward action game, and one with a coherent story that feels well paced, if too full of schlocky cliché for some. But that is, ultimately, all it does: remains. [Dec 2005, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Track & Field and its ilk have few pretensions beyond being disposable and frantic multiplayer diversions; Beijng 2008 has made its events marginally more taxing, but no more joyful. [Aug 2008, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s easy to admire the developer’s evident love for the NES game – it’s clearly been handled with the kind of care only a genuine fan would provide – but after a few repetitive hours bouncing around DuckTales’ pretty but unremarkable worlds you’ll begin to realise that some treasures aren’t worth the effort of unearthing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A clever game, then, but not a particularly fulfilling one. [Sept 2009, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Rogue Agent is the result of design by committee: a safe, reasonably accomplished but uninspiring offering which neither excels nor progresses its genre in any way. [Christmas 2004, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The most dedicated of slash ‘em up fans may be willing to ride out the disparity between Nano Breaker’s furious highs and comatose lows, but this just doesn’t feel like an experiment made for the player’s benefit – unless it’s one borne out by the next Castlevania. [March 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Thanks in no small part to the slavish love of motion capture over more manageable keyframe animation, the fights in Icon are sluggish, crude and practically underwater when it comes to control. [Apr 2007, p.79]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Balancing real-time action with tactical micro-management proves beyond Vanpool. With arbitrary limitations placed on an already meagre cash supply, and towers and fortifications proving equally flimsy, what little money is available is best poured into single-use items and permanent ability boosts for Dillon.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the simplicity of the puzzles, it's an unnecessarily bewildering game for the first hour or so. There's an RPG's worth of menus, full of abilities and stats you just don't need to know about yet. [Mar 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Its problem is what the missions ask of you: they are simply too tough. Trained soldiers would and should mutiny when asked to carry out the tasks AA routinely asks of you. [Mar 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The detection of item-grabbing slashes is often fumbled, and since moving your finger can leave you prone to missing punches, it ruins a promising risk-reward system.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    All good clean fun, then, but it's not really anything we haven't seen before. [Nov 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The sad fact is that this combat mostly fails to ignite interest, and combined with its cruel difficulty spikes, occasional glitches and a severe differential in graphical quality between 360 and PS3 versions (the latter losing out), Turok's strong contextualisation and smattering of brave ideas get buried. [Mar 2008, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A nice core bit of gameplay tarted up with unnecessary pretensions and stretched too thin, even over its short playtime. It feels like a minigame from a bigger title – specifically, those minigames from God of War and Dead Space 2 in which you guide a plummeting hero through falling debris. What it doesn’t feel like is a full a game – let alone the artsy indie hero Sony would like it to be.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A reminder of both what you adore and abhor in a series that's had its simple joys diluted by flash-in-the-plan iterations and ideas.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Did a purse-holder at Activision one day grapple fruitlessly with the last game's control system and scrawl in their subsequent notes "Make the next one so that I can play it"? Speculation aside, someone sure messed-up Spider-Man. [Dec 2005, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    "Quotation Forthcoming"
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Remarkably compelling. But there's only so much joy to be found in repetition, particularly when dogfighting interludes are so mannered. Ultimately, it's difficult to recall what all the fuss was ever about. [May 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Like Borderlands, the promise of fresh guns, equipment and powered-up skills offers an incentive to press on. But unlike its parent series, the combat in Legends means it's not worth doing so.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Platforming only ever threatens to be acceptable, lacking both the freedom and finesse that further development time might have granted, while the lightcycle sections - well, there might not be any way of saving them. [Jan 2011, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a far more systemically diverse game than Heavy Rain, and its story is certainly more believably told through Holmes, Dafoe and a fine supporting cast. Yet this is a game almost entirely bereft of tension, one in which failure goes largely unpunished and is almost always inconsequential. There is emotion here, but it’s felt passively, as spectator instead of player.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What we're left with is an update that is out of date, a reimagining without enough imagination. To be this simplistic, the game needed a masterful melee system and a range of inspiring enemies; it tries, but it doesn't fully deliver on either count. [Jan 2011, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s all personality and no muscle, a prime victim for getting sand kicked in its face by the numerous RPG beefcakes currently swaggering around on PS2. [July 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Sadly, encounters with enemy AI - particularly in combat - are by far the weakest link in an otherwise enjoyable effort. [Apr 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What we're left with is an update that is out of date, a reimagining without enough imagination. To be this simplistic, the game needed a masterful melee system and a range of inspiring enemies; it tries, but it doesn't fully deliver on either count. [Jan 2011, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Housemarque has certainly put in the effort, but the twin-stick shooter might simply be more rewarding when you're skidding over the smooth-scrolling surface of one of Super Stardust's wraparound arenas than stumbling through darkened alleyways with a tangle of undead shambling after you. [Jan 2011, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a game that, for all the intricacy of its systems and the charm of its painterly world, feels oddly empty.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    But for parents and adults, Undercover is a less inviting prospect, even with its satirical undertone. It’s a plastic facsimile of GTA – a game that was hardly humourless to begin with, and one that has already spawned a genre’s worth of more sophisticated rivals and clones.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Call Of Juarez has mined its source material well, collecting a wealth of imagery that it then squanders on lacklustre and dysfunctional gameplay. [Aug 2007, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Beating the near-infallible AI to the line is a challenge best described as punitive, and periodically maddeningly unbalanced. [Mar 2008, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Jumping damages the delicate balance of mechanics that makes the series so distinctive and pushes Rearmed 2 into the wider genre bracket of run-and-gun platforming. [Mar 2011, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As chaotic and unrefined as it is, however, it motors on with a definite sense of purpose and provides a solid sense of fulfilment, if not necessarily one of accomplishment. [Christmas 2005, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Aptly, Outbreak is an experiment gone wrong; it indicates the possibilities of an online horror title, but also that Resident Evil's traditional structure can't achieve them. [June 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A more novel addition is a crafting system lets you convert items you find into items and potions, but it functions more like a secondary currency than an alchemical minigame. There’s nothing egregiously wrong with Mini Ninjas, but nor is there a reason to give up on genre highlights like Punch Quest and Jetpack Joyride.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    After the interesting and confident debut of The Suffering last year, Ties That Bind remains a straightforward action game, and one with a coherent story that feels well paced, if too full of schlocky cliché for some. But that is, ultimately, all it does: remains. [Dec 2005, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Gun
    Why roam freely (when the game lets you, which is by no means always) when all that’s out there to find is an empty trek between jarring episodes of production-line gaming? [Christmas 2005, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Not sensing the damage you're imparting and receiving makes skirmishes seem arbitrary (you'll rely on the HUD reporting your XP wins to know you've taken out enemies at long range), while explosions - in a game based on destruction - pack no punch. [Mar 2011, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine

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