Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,507 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 14% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 83% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Bayonetta
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,507 game reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Production values are high, with iPad providing the best canvas yet for Level-5′s animation and colouring. And though the puzzles and narrative take on a different rhythm to the core series, the delicate balance in their concoction and the demands of their solution – requiring equal amounts of logical and lateral thought – echo those of father Layton’s finest.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Following the excellent Inside Story was always going to be a big ask, so it’s hardly a surprise AlphaDream never quite manages to conjure up anything better than being Bowser. Still, while the comparison to its predecessor does it few favours, rest assured that Dream Team Bros’ additions and curiously entertaining battles do enough to reawaken the desire to see this adventure through to the end.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A Toyko Tale is brief and entirely linear – in the main, you’re simply walking between numbered waypoints, though you can unlock certain dialogues by losing your servant status – but Ayabe transports you so utterly to an unfamiliar time and place that it matters little. By the outlandish and oddly touching final act showdown, you’ll be a rapt spectator, cheering on the heroes alongside Sohta and his newfound friends.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    That’s what Shadowrun Return provides, of course: it’s not just a single tale of murder and techno-conspiracy. It’s a ruleset and a tileset, and a promise of more to come.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While the logic-based puzzles are never too perplexing, they can require a little too much back-and-forth travel between adjacent rooms, occasionally wearing out the good impression made by each gorgeously rendered setting.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Atmospheric, tense, and sometimes unfairly hard, Test3′s roguelike is another welcome entry in a resurgent genre.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It hangs together because its distinct strands feed into one another just enough, even if that relationship is as crude as a dialogue tree leading to you gaining a stat-altering card that you can play during the campaign phase.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What’s left is, while smartly streamlined, a thoroughly orthodox game within a well-established type, a niche within a niche that’s getting smaller all the time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Europa Universalis IV is the game you graduate to when you’re tired of Civilization. That’s ultimately also why all those numbers are there, beneath the surface: because you never graduate away from Europa Universalis IV. It drops you in the deep end before you’re ready, but if you can swim back towards the shallows during those first five hours, you’ll unlock a game so rich, it’ll be helping you tell stories for years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If some activities are variants on familiar parlour games, they’re enlivened by creative twists and side objectives, while others are brimming with invention.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Try and play Shelter as a perfectionist and you’ll fail, the victim of a cruel world and occasionally clunky, unclear rules. Better to simply do your best, allow Might and Delight’s fantastical art to enthrall, and let nature take its course.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Diablo still contains enough impulsive monster-slaying to entertain, but the trek from its home on PC has left it diminished.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s big and beautiful, but it’s also too swollen, too slow, and too buggy to sustain its lofty ambition.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A Disney game that finally lives up to the name.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When the offscreen narrator, voiced with arch-Britishness by Stephen Greif, welcomes you to “the magical theatre of the strange and fantastic”, his adjectives are right on all three counts. And you rarely get magic that feels quite this immaculately handcrafted.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Chinese Room’s temporary stewardship of the series has resulted in an undoubtedly slicker experience, but one that comes at the cost of some of The Dark Descent’s memorable urgency. But there are as many gains here as there are losses.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Buy into Arma 3 now and you’re buying into many promises. Bohemia’s pledge of a coherent campaign, its promise of a wider array of military toys to play with, and its intent to tweak and update AI errors, scripting issues, and pathfinding problems. But these promises are backed up by thousands of the world’s most dedicated players, people who’ve spent years crawling through Arma 2’s rough terrain to find the comparatively even ground of Arma 3. Buying Arma 3 at launch is buying a promise, then, but few games are so meticulously realised, or show so much promise.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Blackbar tells a satisfying dystopian short story, one that invites you to engage directly with its censorship theme.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels like one more step in the right direction for Daedalic, then, and while it’s still in dire need of some truly iconic and unforgettable cast members to define and flesh out its solid handle on the genre, Memoria is another worthwhile investment for both developer and player.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It lacks the original’s elegance and surprise, but as F2P spin-offs go, this isn’t nearly as villainous as you might expect.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    And while The Walking Dead had its share of technical problems, here they’re even worse, with lengthy loading times on 360 fracturing the pace and some several-second freezes completely killing the tension during fight scenes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s little new here, but it’s intelligently assembled, uncommonly generous, and dangerously habit-forming. It’s a healthier brand of addiction than a certain candy-based alternative, but those who can’t afford to lose hours of their day should consider this fair warning.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dual Destinies is an Ace Attorney game, all right, and that’s perhaps the best result anyone could have hoped for.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Many will be satisfied by the simple existence of a COD game on the day next-gen hardware launches, but this is a missed opportunity nonetheless. The studio that defined the console FPS in the current generation has declined to do the same here. By the time it gets another chance, it may be too late.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Let all the vision-obscuring dust settle and it transpires that Battlefield 4 is a more conservative sequel than we were led to expect.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is still a fine – and visually opulent – auto-runner, but it’s bloated, too; a little restraint would have gone a long way.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s a fantastic combo system at Killer Instinct’s core, but right now it feels like half a game – one full of promise, certainly, but not an especially next-gen one either. The cascade of particles may not be enough to retain player interest until the rest of the game arrives.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s no way to sell unused cars back to the AI or to other players, no bespoke onscreen speedometers, no test driving a car before purchase, no kid-friendly Kinect steering or Kinect support in Forzavista, no opportunity to load a circuit-specific tuning setup before a career race, no exiting from a race series without loading up the next track, no unicorn cars, no ‘reasonably priced car’, no auction house, no storefront, and no surprise, really.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rivals’ systems show potential, but it is considerably less than the game it might have been.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Polyphony has produced a handling and physics model that is unmatched by any other racer, but failed to provide AI competition capable of showcasing it to its fullest.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Peggle’s secret is the way it makes you feel about these successes – and it’s here that this most feels like a true sequel. Clear out a level and the resulting Ultra Extreme Fever is a bigger festival of light and colour than ever, and Xbox One’s Game DVR popup serves as an extra pat on the back. The accompanying crescendo is no longer limited to Ode To Joy either – each Master has their own piece of classical music.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Cliffhanger endings are fine when the next episode of a TV show is days away, but less so when the wait is likely to last a couple of months. Yet Telltale has already achieved something remarkable, proving – to both Clem and to you – that there’s life after Lee.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Quibbles aside, the good news is that the frantic swiping and tapping to negotiate track obstacles while squeezing in showboating tricks for extra points remains as ebullient as ever. Sitting down to play five minutes of Infinity and losing an entire evening: that’s the real danger.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The constant flow of new sights and well-thought-out puzzles that make up the bulk of the game provide more than enough motivation to see this rescue attempt through to the end.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s a great twitch game beneath this hostile exterior, but Ragequit can’t afford to test players’ endurance on so many levels if its niche shooter is to thrive.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    During Tropical Freeze’s most exacting sequences, you may yearn for Mario’s reliability, but the bludgeoning force of Retro’s presentation is enough to carry a powerful, if traditional, platformer over the finish line.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A sensitive update for a series many thought would stay stuck in the past.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Thief is far from the disaster that many feared it would be, and fans who take the time to customise their settings ahead of their first playthrough will find a rewarding world here to pick clean. Nevertheless, it’s still difficult to shake the feeling that, for all his dexterity, Garrett has stumbled in his attempt to gain access to a new generation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sadly, the technical turbulence that has blighted previous episodes remains – the QTE-powered action beats, though well staged, are hobbled by pauses and awkward transitions, even on PC.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though the necessities of catering to two different audiences mean that it perhaps never quite reaches the heights of either of the pair’s best individual outings, as the credits roll, you’ll likely experience a hollow feeling, the emptiness that only the best stories leave behind.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As an open-world game, Second Son feels emaciated. There’s little to do in the way of side missions, and what is here becomes repetitive, unlikely to sustain interest beyond a single playthrough. Approach it as an action game that just happens to be set in a nonlinear environment and it makes more sense, but its not-inconsiderable achievements take effort to uncover.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Banished is a rare technical achievement, pure in design and of purpose. Its many deaths almost always feel fair, and the battle up to self-sufficiency is gripping. But the absence of a long game beyond this early toil makes it hard to find reasons to settle down here, except for the views, especially if you’ve established yourself on these frosty plains before.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Although Suikoden 3 is better than the average Japenese RPG, it's clear that with the move to 3D Konami has tried to freshen the formula. But by watering down the series' bastion gameplay elements it may have alienated all but the fanatics. [Sept 2003]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There's nothing to stop a dedicated RPG fan from having a thoroughly good time but the Arc the Lad games have always had a derivative heritage and this is competent but sadly no different. [Sept 2003]
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Four years on and Republic is revealed as a more familiar and modest proposition. What promised to be revolutionary has emerged as a mere curio. A shame. [Oct 2003, p.90]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's disappointing to find that a game so reliant upon riding earthy mounds, avoiding rocks and leaping chasms leaves the player feeling disassociated from the environments. For all the sensory feedback you could as well be controlling a futuristic hoverboard. [Oct 2003, p.102]
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Comparisons with "Halo" are inevitable. Unfortunately, Fire Warrior shows how developers can steal elements from superior games, while fundamentally misunderstanding why they worked so well in the first place. [Nov 2003, p.101]
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Comparisons with "Halo" are inevitable. Unfortunately, Fire Warrior shows how developers can steal elements from superior games, while fundamentally misunderstanding why they worked so well in the first place. [Nov 2003, p.101]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The game's great strength is the well-judged escalation of pace and scale. From your humble dungarees-and-pistol beginnings, the expansion of your squad means missions intensify from hit-and-run raids to large-scale onslaughts. And it is this, ultimately, which induces a sensation of swaggering brawn that allows the game's hiccups to be forgiven. [Oct 2003, p.99]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    More intelligent than your average online shooter, ... this quirky concept deserves recognition. [May 2004, p.108]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Although inadequacies prove more memorable than the game's positive features, dig deep enough and there's and enjoyable game. It's just that finding it sometimes proves unnecessarily arduous. [Nov 2003, p.102]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's entertaining, but if SOCOM II is the pinnacle of Sony's online achievement - and it is - then Microsoft has convincingly won the online battle. At least for this round. [Mar 2004, p.100]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Had the level design have been a touch more ingenious, and the creatures exhibited more guile, this could have been memorable. [June 2004, p.106]
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are neat touches: you've got infinite ammo, brilliantly, and inhaling gas leaves you with a temporary cough that ruins your aim … but it needs a few more tactics to make it more than the sum of its admittedly solid parts. [Christmas 2003, p.116]
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As the platformer has been slowly bent into a sort of adventure game, it's a pleasant shock to be taken back to a time when missing that jump really did mean you had to start again. Collecting things is kept to a minimum and your quest is tightly packed and varied. [Apr 2004, p.109]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ignorance of Pyro's past glories is actually an advantage with Commandos 3 since it means the tension and atmosphere that the series still has in abundance can be enjoyed without the nagging feeling that things aren't what they used to be. Inspiration and aspirations appear to be in short supply in the Commandos camp.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It gains points for plot and the audacity of simulating an online world, and could have scored higher, but its simplicity and inflexible save system drag it down. [Apr 2004, p.108]
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    New skills are simply triggered randomly during battles, resulting in the confusing hit and miss levelling up that so infuriates attention deficient westerners... Indeed, the manner of the execution makes for tough gaming but, paradoxically, it's the exclusivity of the gameplay that will attract a few. [Nov 2003, p.108]
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Chaos Legion isn't as sharp as it should be. Beautiful, polished and at times engaging Capaom's latest invention, nevertheless, tests neither the reactions nor the brain enough to hold your interest. [May 2003, p.93]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Is this the most violent game of all time? Maybe. Its ragdoll physics may not match the flying limbs and broken faces of Soldier of Fortune, but its throwaway approach to life and death is genuinely shocking, leaving a bitter, metallic aftertaste. This is neither a fall nor an ascension. This is an update. [Jan 2004, p.105]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A commendably brazen and unfussy shooter, featuring one continuous dialogue of throwaway gunfire and nothing else. [Feb 2004, p.106]
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    From bedrooms containing clever and mysterious moving panels to a 'Land of the Giants'-style pool challenge, each section delivers something new and exciting to motivate deeper exploration. [Apr 2004, p.110]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    When the game eventually gets going, it's almost as much fun as it's predecessor. It's just that it takes several hours to kick off. Dark Cloud 2 still has merit, but it's simply not as enjoyable as the first game. [May 2003, p.95]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Is this the most violent game of all time? Maybe. Its ragdoll physics may not match the flying limbs and broken faces of Soldier of Fortune, but its throwaway approach to life and death is genuinely shocking, leaving a bitter, metallic aftertaste. This is neither a fall nor an ascension. This is an update. [Jan 2004, p.105]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Another decent GunCon arcade experience from Namco, which shoots all of the (now very familiar) lightgun game boxes. Fun for a while, certainly, but there are no surprises. [Dec 2003, p.107]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Pitch detection is accurate and, for the songs you know, Konami couldn't have provided a better arena for belting out the warbles you've perfected in the shower. But for the songs you don't know - and there are likely to be many - those warbles will be your undoing, capsizing an otherwise satisfying quest for high score. [Aug 2004, p.106]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Argonaut's latest platformer is certainly a curious brew. You get the impression that loads of ideas have been thrown into the pot but, unfortunately, none of the weaker ones have been rejected. [Feb 2004, p.101]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Vega$ pushes the stagnant tycoon genre as far as it can go, and is currently the best looking management sim available. But how far can you flog a dead Elvis? [Dec 2003, p.103]
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Realistically, Buraiden's biggest appeal lies in the joyous anarchy of the multiplayer modes. Team up two-on-two, three-on-one or every-samurai-for-himself, replace any absent human players with the game's convincing AI, set the battle parameters, and prepare for the kind of balletic carnage that Tarantino will soon be ripping off for volume two of 'Kill Bill'. [JPN Import; Feb 2004, p.98]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s insight into what lay beneath GoldenEye’s unforgettable skin is commendable. But the subsequent attempt to update and embellish the formula is, while a gleeful pleasure, not wholly successful. [July 2005, p.88]
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An unforgiving experience … but Nightshade still has enough chutzpah to give those weaned on games without saves a stern and nostalgic challenge. Those afraid of tough bosses need not apply. [Mar 2004, p.103]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It remains compelling, but much of that compulsion is in expecting the game to truly deliver - a moment you'll likely still be awaiting at the anticlimactic conclusion. [Jan 2005, p.89]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Look at it one way, and it's a choking journey with unprecedented attention to unease and psychological horror, a game framed with unparalleled sophistication. From another angle, it's just a clunky PSone throwback, with all the design wit of a dodo. [Aug 2004, p.92]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Real strategic thinking is less useful than exploiting the single-mindedness of the enemy AI. That rings true of many SRPGs, but can leave a cheap aftertaste to an otherwise decisive victory. [Sept 2004, p.102]
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An impressively comprehensive, reasonably captivating though ultimately flawed experience. [June 2005, p.95]
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An impressively comprehensive, reasonably captivating though ultimately flawed experience. [June 2005, p.95]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Only the most ardent grognard will do more than dent the surface of this enormous strategy game, which rather diminishes the overall impact for the rest of us. [Mar 2004, p.110]
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As an example of unabashed, often exuberant Britsoft that pulls out the SRPG's staples and rebinds it in approachable ease, Future Tactics is remarkable, deserving of cult status. [Aug 2004, p.99]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Red Star is more of a red dwarf next to some of the more sharp-witted and unabashed action titles that have landed on PS2 in recent years, but one that's still capable of shininig. [May 2007, p.95]
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While there is scope for each skirmish to play out differently, it's simpler to respond in kind to cheap deaths by lobbing pre-emptive grenades into scripted entry points - and in doings so, you're not so much numbed to the shock of Killzone's war as anaesthetised. [Christmas 2004, p.84]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Area 51 is entirely without inspiration, an exercise in slick, crowd-pleasing cookie-cutter cliché from the Jerry Bruckheimer school of entertainment manufacture. It is absolutely not bad, almost never broken, and usually a good deal of fun. [July 2005, p.92]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Over-dependence on legwork over the bulk of each world robs the game of its sparkle, making it feel more work-ethic sweatshop than well-paced sweetshop. [Dec 2005, p.111]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Elements such as marching onto an island, or talking to a governor, seem flat and underdeveloped. Islands are sparse and awkward experiences, while their governors are often illogical and nonsensical in their responses. [Jan 2005, p.88]
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Demon Stone suggests more potential than it fulfils, but it’s a not-entirely-failed experiment in teaching old dice new tricks, and a follow-up with the same attention to detail but more ambitious design would be welcome. [Nov 2004, p.108]
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    None of this feels like a refinement, … just a slight bulking up. With Legends, you’re buying into an upgraded suite of presentation – of lengthy career modes, of yet more movie-faithful music – than anything else. [Nov 2004, p.105]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's when the game is at its most GTA-like that it comes alive, conjuring up scenarios that take in whole city boroughs and throwing at you groups of adversaries and challenges you have to juggle on the fly… and then you get to a tediously engineered boss encounter and it all begins to get tiresome again. [Christmas 2005, p.109]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Jak 3 too often feels like you're merely going through the motions. As the series' conclusion, then, it's a mild disappointment. [Christmas 2004, p.89]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Other than some disappointing visuals, there's little to complain about in arcade, exhibition and mutliplayer modes. [July 2004, p.109]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Spider-Man 2 presents players with a city ripe for action and exploration, but once you swing down out of the clouds and take a closer look at the grubby streets and roads strewn with vehicles, you'll find little to pique your interest. [Sept 2004, p.100]
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Under the Skin is refreshing but it's let down by its erratic camera and the whole experience eventually wears thin.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An overall shoddy feeling to the production spoils a great deal more. Where there should be panache, there are rough edges. As a comedy, it achieves much. It is funny. But as a sports game a great deal more polish is required. [Sept 2004, p.106]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The handling hasn’t evolved and a year on, with the masking novelty of the game’s tuning aspects worn off, it’s disappointingly limited and remote. And despite the increased choice and plot introduction the whole exercise can often feel soulless. [Christmas 2004, p.60]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The handling hasn’t evolved and a year on, with the masking novelty of the game’s tuning aspects worn off, it’s disappointingly limited and remote. And despite the increased choice and plot introduction the whole exercise can often feel soulless. [Christmas 2004, p.60]
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    WOTS2's intentionally short running time (most story paths can be finished in little over two hours), a steady stream of unlockable rewards, and the gradual appreciation of its combat system's depth can make replays strangely compelling. [July 2004, p.105]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ironically, it’s people who haven’t played Champions rather than veterans who could find the most to like, given that it’s a year’s worth of tweaks and polish on that game’s largely positive foundation. [Apr 2005, p.105]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s very easy to while away the time just terrorising the populace of each level in an increasingly destructive fashion, but to actually care enough to contribute anything to a completion percentage is another matter entirely. [July 2005, p.86]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There’s no question that DUB Edition can be pleasurable, especially in the multiplayer games, but the Career mode too often feels like graft. There are tournaments, one-off street races and ‘special’ events, but each individual race feels much the same as the last. [June 2005, p.92]
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The variety of the controls is overdone, making the game complex and confusing, and there's no customisable multiplayer. Nonetheless, this is a welcoming, capable and entertaining take on what gaming used to mean. [Aug 2004, p.106]
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The player is required to reap their principle enjoyment from the narrative and the cinematic rather than the interactive. The traditional flow of play has been turned on its head: cut-scenes are the new king, gameplay elements little more than lines to link the drama. [Apr 2005, p.104]
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though the game’s confidence falters, its storytelling never does, building a new myth with the kind of passion and resonance expected from an eastern retelling of an old one, and enriching the entire sweep of its universe. [June 2005, p.84]