Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,559 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Grand Theft Auto V
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,559 game reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From the patchwork fields of the Dover coastline to the unforgettable sight of Berlin burning in the pouring rain, the carefully characterised locations are as integral to the experience as its encyclopedic line-up of planes. [Oct 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Just when the whole thing seems in danger of becoming a cold study in design brilliance, however, the on-screen clock comes into its own, raising the game’s temperature by turning each challenge into a speed-runner’s dream.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Open about the toys you can play with in the final stages of research, strategy in Supreme Commander 2 is pure – worked out before the battle begins and maintained as a line under your tactical moves.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game’s depth is matched by a generous breadth of modes and options.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Over the Top has tempered its obvious ambition with skill and understanding, and the result is a game that’s refreshingly quick to take flight.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Splosion Man lives up to his name, providing a burst of exciting, arresting fresh IP that significantly changes the landscape around.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Codemasters is as attuned to track-building and racecraft as it has ever been. [Oct 2009, p.92]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    That teetering battle between pride and strategy than ensues every time you decide whether to comprehensively flatten a villain with an unnecessary monosyllabic flourish or gamble on saving it for your next target, hoping the board doesn’t get scrambled before you get a chance to show off.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Zuma's simple ingredients have once again brewed up a surprisingly powerful brand of magic. [Nov 2009, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite being all about the numbers, FM2010 rises above them to be unexpectedly cruel, kind, and even visceral at times. [Christmas 2009, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's certainly fun, but at times it's more than that: around the parody of leveling orbits a whole universe of bigger and better systems to lose yourself within. [Feb 2010, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Much like a summer movie blockbuster, Split Second offers thrills galore, but there's a hint of glossy superficiality to it, too...Yet there are few games in the genre that create quite so many sharp intakes of breath and instances of unintentionally barked profanity as this one, and sometimes that's what racing gaming is all about. [June 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The perfect candidate for the 100th WiiWare game, LostWinds is on the verge of outgrowing the service it almost single-handedly redeems. [Dec 2009, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But the puzzles themselves are nearly an unmitigated joy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sin And Punishment 2's real value lies in the (now online-enabled) hi-score tables and a brilliant risk/reward scoring system. [Christmas 2009, p.94]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shooter feels accomplished and robust, a rounded and consistently enjoyable achievement. [Jan 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Spirit Tracks' aging tricks continue to carry you cack into the narcotic realms of pure ritual, until you're deep in the caverns yet again, holding the magic yellow boomerang once more, and wondering what quirky brilliance it will bring with it this time. [Christmas 2009, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The stuff of legend, then? Indeed. Although, perhaps fittingly, one with nothing new to say. [Apr 2010, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is as good as you'll find on DSiWare at the moment, and it'll likely stay that way until Q-Games comes up with another mini-marvel. [Feb 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Napoleon ultimately feels like the more successful younger brother to Empire. It fundamentally shares its DNA, for better and worse, but has learned from its mistakes, and has stayed trim and buff.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game is sumptuously constructed - its spindly and grotesque sense of caricature is a delight and the lively score is maddeningly hummable. [Apr 2010, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The details of each individual victory may fade with time, but you’ll never forget the fractal patchwork rippling beneath you, or the stormy static of the clouds that clash overhead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A fizzing treat that refuses to ever dissolve away entirely, Alien Zombie Death is pacy, mean-spirited, and delightful.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For those of us with purer nail-hitting, dog-poking and badger-stomping in mind, the pleasure will have to remain in the doing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The darling of the indie scene for so many years, it's a pleasure to see the game proving itself all over again. [June 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's loads to do here. [June 2010, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A triumphant toolset attached to a decent stab at the karting genre
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Provides too little in the way of engaging structure behind its exemplary racing to make it more than a series of thrilling rides. [July 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Atlus's surgery sim is in rude health. [July 2010, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At its best, this is more than just the purest, most narcotic action game in the world – it's a cultural pinnacle. Every superhero, be it in comic books or the movies they've inspired, wishes they could visit its playground.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At its core, though, is Hydro Thunder Hurricane's handling model. Swerving between subtlety and throttle every few seconds, it graces tracks that provide both competitive dashes and full-on fairground rides. All this is wrapped up in a perpetually rewarding structure that keeps these precious elements fresh, making up a comeback that holds its first principles close.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Enjoyably whipped through in three hours, And Yet It Moves finds rare extra pull in unlockable modes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hothead games may just have discovered that the best way to dispel Diablo's shadow is to make light of it. [Sept 2010, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not bad for the unlikely sequel to a game hardly anyone played. [Sept 2010, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's certainly going out with a bang. [Sept 2010, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Other M dabbles in cinematic tricks and sensational set-pieces, but its strength is in the foundations: it builds an enveloping 3D world from straight lines and right angles, and ups the gears of its rewarding basics constantly. It offers an uncluttered slice of sci-fi action, a singular take on the thirdperson adventure, and a combat system of pared-down beauty.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The conservative setting and lack of an engaging storyline may do little to excite RTS veterans but, in its ruleset, Ruse expands upon the genre in a way that goes beyond gimmick. [Oct 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    F1 2010 remains a game to be uttered in the same breath as Crammond's Formula One Grand Prix, Bizarre Creations' Formula 1 '97, and Ayrton Senna's Super Monaco GP II.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Enslaved's greatest achievement is standing out in the crowded field of me- too, colour-sapped videogame apocalypses, serving as a vibrant oasis in the otherwise murky brown wastes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a system that very naturally sets up some excellent multiplayer modes, and this is one of an elite few that can truly even the odds between players at different difficulty levels.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No game since Wii Sports has done so much to capture Nintendo's mixture of initial accessibility, entertainment value and wide appeal. [Christmas 2010, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When Dance Central works, the feeling is borderline euphoric - in the blood-pumping, serotonin-inducing way that only dancing can be - as you find yourself stringing moves you learnt individually into coherent routines. [Christmas 2010, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Guwange appears the most accessible of Cave's late-90s output, even if the latter stages of the game, particularly in the two extra modes featured in this update, will require a combination of dedicated practice and natural skill to overcome. [Oct 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game's parts are by turns novel and enjoyable, but when played in longer bursts feel repetitive. Brotherhood is Assassin's Creed II 2, its new mechanics feeling more like extensions of an existing form than innovations. It's a greatest hits disc, then, a weighty, good-value deal that plays the series' best bits – but there's the constant danger that you've heard them before.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In giving fans what they want, and delivering what a modern audience needs, the studio has created a game that, while not quite a classic, sometimes reminds you of one. [Christmas 2010, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Finally, Sega can dust off that classic marketing line, because once you've played Vanquish, everything else seems a little bit slow. [Dec 2010, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The majority of SMB is a finely executed tightrope act of death and rebirth, as funny as it is fun and as precise as it is inventive. [Christmas 2010, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not since Yoshi's Island's designers broke out the crayons has a Nintendo platformer looked so much like a work of craft, but it's a pity that, for the most part, the levels don't feel as fresh as they look - a platform made of butterfly stitching is still just a platform. [Christmas 2010, p.93]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a well plotted and paced, if straight-laced, action adventure that takes most of the strengths of the main franchise while removing a few of the weaknesses. [Christmas 2010, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a vehicle that may win over more action fans than true-bloods, but its plagiaristic tendencies represent a shrewd way of ensuring that the series gets a firm footing outside of the 2D realm. [Nov 2010, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bar a handful of bosses, Dark Dawn is a pushover, never requiring you to brave the combat's depths. Yes, it grants breathing room for testing unlikely combinations, but we'd have liked to put our mastery to the test. [Jan 2011, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although the basic joy of rolling realistic water around might be short-lived, it's bolstered by the far greater satisfaction of solving the game's intuitive, well-paced puzzles. [Jan 2011, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's clever without being intimidating, delicate without being volatile, and immediate without a sense of panic. [Feb 2011, p.99]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    How apt that interactivity and fiction should finally merge in a fiction about interactions. The dead are restored, and the genre with them. [Feb 2011, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As we wait for the first of the promised updates, then, there's plenty of reason to hope that this is the beginning, after all –the beginning of something rather special.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A rewarding stopgap for anyone after something old on something new. [July 2010, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stacking's best qualities are its eccentricity and ingenuity. The puzzles lack the tortured bite of Double Fine's early work, but in broadening the narrative-led puzzle game's scope and carefully choosing which elements of tradition to keep and which to discard, Stacking is a bold and charming reinvention.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stacking's best qualities are its eccentricity and ingenuity. The puzzles lack the tortured bite of Double Fine's early work, but in broadening the narrative-led puzzle game's scope and carefully choosing which elements of tradition to keep and which to discard, Stacking is a bold and charming reinvention.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Vivid, smart and perhaps a little mocking, then, Infinity Gene, like Extreme, has exchanged the cold depths of space for the trippy vortex of some strange digital migraine: this classic isn't growing old with grace, but it's certainly continuing to evolve.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whereas a more comprehensive reimagining of how Okami would work on DS could have resulted in a less ambitious, more polished game, Okamiden succeeds in preserving both the spirit and form of its forebear, and that makes in rather special indeed. [Mar 2011, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where next for Pokemon? Black and White don't suggest any answers, but they do remind us why we'd care in the first place. [Mar 2011, p.103]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where next for Pokemon? Black and White don't suggest any answers, but they do remind us why we'd care in the first place. [Mar 2011, p.103]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This sequel isn't the leap forward the concept deserves, but it's a testament to the original that it remains a standout personality over two years on, at a point when quality platform games have become thin on the ground. [Mar 2011, p.99]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Motorstorm has a special relationship with chaos, and if you can keep your head when all about you are throwing their controllers, you're just as likely to lose. Less battle than survival racing, it's happy to let fairness be a stain on the tarmac. [Apr 2011, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While PixelJunk Shooter 2 may seem more like an expansion than a standalone game, there's no shortage of new ingredients to enrich what was already a lively concoction. [Apr 2011, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The 3DS' first fighting game happens to be a version of one of the genre's best, and it's lost little in the conversion to a portable system. Token additions, such as the cute-but-unworkable Dynamic (3D) View, bulk out the package, but it's what's stayed the same that's the real triumph here. SSFIV is just as vibrant, fluid and confident as ever – and it's just been unshackled from your TV.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ruby/Sapphire is probably the most intricate and detailed console RPG available. Staring into it will make many players woozy. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Advance Wars 2 isn't really Advance Wars 2, it's Advance Wars 1.5. Still a superb game, it's only close to perfect for those who've never experienced perfection before. [Sept 2003]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Boktai re-invigorates almost every aspect of the tired dungeon-and-items formula. The light-sensor technology works flawlessly and opens up a host of possibilities for future games. A beautiful game in almost every respect. [Oct 2003, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Excellent. The rhythms of the day quickly become second nature and hypnotically absorbing. There're never enough hours in the day. [Jan 2004, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Superstar Saga does justice to Miyamoto-san's original vision: a world of deliciously impossible creatures and impeccably illogical logic. A world where you never know what'll happen next but, once it has, you know it's what always should have happened. [Jan 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Zero mission is … old, but it's also tantalisingly new, coupled with a tightening of the mythos and franchise in anticipation of follow-ups to "Prime" and "Fusion." It works. [Apr 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A masterclass in imaginative flair and precision-engineered game mechanics. The GBA is beginning to feel all grown up. [Feb 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It would be easy to take The Minish Cap for granted, left as it is with little to do but shuffle and tinker with its immaculate heritage. That, however, would be a grave mistake... Maybe you can't go wrong with the Zelda template, but they haven't always gone this right. [Christmas 2004, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's not so much a game with depth as one with width, a fat pool of possible ways to idle away your time between quests, allowing you to craft what feels like an unprecedented sense of social personality, in terms of colour and grandeur if not actual complexity. [Nov 2004, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It isn't any kind of reinvention, but a revitalisation, with a style so rich that it becomes an integral part of the game's substance; Psychonauts breathes imagination and individuality as effortlessly as most games steal from one another. [July 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By departing from established videogame norms and offering an experience that is unfettered by restrictive goals and objectives, Tecmo has succeeded in evoking a supremely relaxing vacation atmosphere and producing a quite unique, and singularly satisfying game. [March 2003, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thankfully, the conversion from keyboard and mouse to pad has been made with rare judgement - movement is smooth and aiming is easy. The classic gameplay has made the transition too, and is as rewarding as ever. [Jan 2004, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The best tennis game of this generation, if not ever. A crisp, responsive and consuming sports title where the act of hitting the ball is made so effortless that your focus can be instantly diverted towards thinking about tactics and exploring the subtle depth on offer. [Jan 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not re-invent the wheel, but MotoGP2 is a shiny new alloy among racing games, and builds upon the series' excellent reputation. And that should be enough to stir up Xbox live all over again. [June 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Amped 2 is Amped with the right trigger gently pressed: it's tweaked. Balance meters take away some of the series' grace, but make it more of a game, like Tony Hawk's tilted downwards. [Christmas 2003, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The control system deserves special mention, as it could so easily have been crude or overwhelming. Instead, it's sophisticated and sensitive, catering solidly enough for corridor-cleaning run'n'guns while allowing ambitious flights of TK fancy. [Aug 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is ballsy, brash, confident gaming at its best - a lesson in how games don't have to be perfect to be brilliant. [Christmas 2003, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you take away the window dressing, the epic sounds and the preordained surprises this is a derivative, one-note and sometimes flawed game, but see it as a spectacular amusement ride and you can play and it's a distinguished achievement. [Christmas 2003, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Another excellent outing for Codemasters' rally team, but one that has possibly taken the series to its structural - and commercial - limits. [Nov 2003, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This relaxed, arcade-like approach makes for something that's not so much about simulation, but more emulation; letting you thwack the ball with all the verve of an expert, without the worry of any homework. Fun, then, and lots of it. [Nov 2003, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The franchise is now only a fraction away from realising its full potential. [June 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a complete game package Conker: Live & Reloaded is tremendously good value. Significantly, it also shows a company finally back on form. [Aug 2005, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever you conclude about the bigger picture, this is special stuff. The claustrophobic buzz of flies, the distant muezzin drone, the desperation as you crouch uncertain in the dust whilst your men call frantically for orders will lodge in your mind long after you've walked away from the game. [July 2004, p.98]
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's disappointing that basic irritants are still evident in the singleplayer game. But it's the online version - which takes the hunter/hunted metaphor to chilling extremes - which ends up being one of the most nerve-racking gaming experiences of all time. [Apr 2004, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if its technical handicaps are clear, what it achieves with the palette at its disposal is astounding. Instincts' lower resolution textures, sporadic pop-up, cruder characters and jagged shadows are all clearly defined beneath its baking sun, but the composition of the overall canvas offers a masterful distraction. [Nov 2005, p.100]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In keeping with the original, Otogi 2 is something of an empty vessel, but it's one of the most ornate and accomplished around, possibly the most excessively and obscenely beautiful videogame yet made. Games that are this electric and uniquely rewarding don't come along very often, whereas those with more complexity are commonplace. Take your pick. [Mar 2004, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    OutRun 2’s heady caricature of driving is some kind of high-water mark for how much beautifully slick, instantly fluid and, thanks to the excellent use of joypad rumble, gloriously tangible play can be squeezed into five minutes of flamboyant autoerotica. [Nov 2004, p.98]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those accustomed to the adult world of online PC gaming may have reason to sniff at the more streamlined play, but Pandemic has given consoles a whole new genre, pretty much perfectly formed... No game has ever felt quite so much like playing with Star Wars figures. [Nov 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gameplay purists may scowl, but Read Dead Revolver is a triumph for beautifully observed atmospherics, characterisation and slapstick set-pieces you cannot fail to enjoy. [June 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As forgettable as the story mode is, this is a game that should be judged by the pleasure it can bring to a room full of gamers eager for furious arena combat and a splendid variety of team games. And judged by those criteria, it has few peers. [Apr 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This dazzling, determinedly populist experience was not made according to the standards other games are made by, and when judged – or even just described – by those standards, it might seem slender to the point of frailty. [Christmas 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Because there's an underlying subtlety and sophistication in the handling - and it's encouraging to see even minor damage and tyre wear affecting lap times - the compulsion to shave fractions off your records is always there. [June 2005, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From its overpowered weapons and gormless AI to its pedestrian objecctives, the singleplayer game is as dumb as it is misguided – an embarrassment to the rather splendid mulitplayer game that, fortunately, represents all that's really important. [Dec 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a superior control system and a raft of incisive upgrades, this year's update is a connoisseur of the boxing arts. [Apr 2005, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine