Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,611 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Last of Us
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,611 game reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Mission design feels particularly lazy this time round, Locomotive seemingly jotting down amusing cutscene scenarios before finding tenuous ways of tying ‘destroy this’ or ‘abduct that’ tasks to the constant stream of ooh-er references to ‘big willies’ and ‘meat’ in the dialogue. [May 2008, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Where B-Boy crucially disappoints is in the execution of its gameplay. The turn-based nature of its stages is interminably frustrating. [Oct 2006, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Given that its bland combat is little enhanced by the ability to create cover, you suspect that the promises made for the technology have simply dug its own grave. [Dec 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    At its best, Orgarhythm's disparate ingredients coalesce into scenes of thrilling tribal warfare, a winningly eclectic soundtrack stirring your men to march into battle. Too often, however, you end up feeling like your fragmented cabal: disorientated, frustrated and battered into submission by an unforgiving enemy, with little reason to keep on fighting.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overall impression is of a game that’s both bravely and badly designed, and weighted towards the latter. [July 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a solid concept, but Honeyslug struggles to develop it in any meaningful way.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The plot may be filled with sub-Lynchian fumbles, but it weaves an intriguing story, while the charismatic muddle of awards that accompanies each solution goes some way to wiping away the grey memory of what you're actually being congratulated for.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    If the Old West is anything, it's a giant myth, and one that the Call Of Juarez games have always embodied. What The Cartel replaces this with – a mishmash of 
The Shield and conspiracy theories – is a much less substantial vision, played out within a world with no real resonance to it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Feels cheeky to be criticising a scrolling beat 'em up for being too shallow, but TMNT is possibly one of the most tedious ever. Repetition is only acceptable when you're repeating something gratifying. [Jan 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It’s a game that makes you desperately want to feel like a Jedi, arcing your lightsaber across the screen, ducking under attacks, parrying counters and going in for the kill, but the subtlety just isn’t there. [July 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's in need of plenty more flair, not so much that it strains against what its buttoned-down framework is trying to achieve, but just to inject some feeling of variety into its skirmishes and sorties. [Sept 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    What it didn't factor into the design is that kleptomaniacs rarely bother collecting items without emotional gravitas, and this oversight becomes immediately obvious when you compare Rumble to its source material. [Jan 2010, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Soldier of Fortune’s damage model is probably its major selling point and, lamentably, the only thing that makes its combat entertaining. [Feb 2008, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For a title trying hard to inject personality into the genre, the experience feels irreparably mechanical. There's plenty of variety in terms of racing categories and machinery, but the overall lack of involvement is inexcusable. [Feb 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Moops isn't a bad idea for a iOS title, then, but it's extremely poorly implemented. For a game about bug hunting, it's failed to catch enough of its own.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Yes, Beat Down revives the warped charisma of Capcom’s beat’em up heyday, but that’s the only area where it actually triumphs. [Oct 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Playing it instils a completely neutral response, as though it were no more than a means of absorbing time. [Jan 2008, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Even with just an additional pair of buttons for camera movement, a broad switch of irritations could have been avoided, but as it is, Death Jr is recommended only for forgiving platformer enthusiasts. [Nov 2005, p.113]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Cheap bosses and stingy save points ensure that it's a drag as well as a bore, while a handful of crash bugs do very little to improve proceedings. My Little Hero's greatest charm is its air of sweet innocence, perhaps, but in truth this adventure is primitive rather than childlike.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Bad Day LA is the game people often say they want and then ignore when it arrives; it prizes ambition over execution and flair over finesse and both pays the price and reaps the rewards for daring to do so. [Sept 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The last thing on Glory Days’ mind is fun: it instead angrily stomps forward to the beat of the ‘war is hell’ drum. [Oct 2007, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    You can see things worth admiring here. The promise of sandbox combat emerging from the interplay between environment and gun-modes never comes good, instead devolving into a repetitive, gruelling bedlam - but that promise alone is more than many shooters offer. To make anything of it, however, Hard Reset would need to go right back to the drawing board.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Blacksite is a thoroughly unexceptional title for which unrealistic promises were made, and one that is further let down by a wide assortment of bugs and design issues. [Jan 2008, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Voyeurs will be disappointed, since the sex portrayed is the very model of conventionality. The really shocking thing is how close Singles gets to being wholesome. [June 2004, p.111]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For such a costly flagship title to provide neither the promised statement of mainstream grown-up appeal nor even polished, lesser disposable thrills is a landmark failure. [May 2006, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Something of a departure, sure, but it's nothing new. Falling awkwardly between action and strategy, it's unlikely to satisfy anyone other than rabidly obsessive fans of the character.
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nasty, brutish and short - and that's once you've got past the interface problems. Temple of Elemental Evil is a huge disappointment by any measure. [Christmas 2003, p.124]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Much as it saddens us, given the promise of seeing a 3D Ghost Trick, we pronounce this dead on arrival.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The game is also lumbered with a tragic split personality. On one hand, there’s a lot to do, and if you like the look of one of the initial five heroes you can do all of it for free with a little grinding. On the other hand, Marvel Heroes is so eager for you to spend – and so keen to extract the most out of your wallet when you do – that the price tag of the game in real-world terms can soon become astonishingly disproportionate to its quality.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With the episodic development cycle all but demanding that structure and form be locked down in the first instalment, with content added thereafter, the series' future looks precarious at best. [June 2008, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine