Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,989 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Iraq in Fragments
Lowest review score: 0 Night Watch: Nochnoi Dozor
Score distribution:
5989 movie reviews
  1. One of the most important movies of my life. It’s one of the two films, the other being Robert Altman’s Nashville, that made me want to be a critic. And that’s because Carrie did more than thrill, frighten, and captivate me; it sent a volt charge through my system that rewired my imagination, showing me everything that movies could be.
  2. Loosely based on real events, this harrowing, superbly made drama by fast-rising filmmaker Gerardo Naranjo (I'm Gonna Explode) is Mexico's 2012 submission for Best Foreign Language Film - rightfully so.
  3. A witty, stylish, beautifully made charmer of a family picture.
  4. It's a quiet dream of a movie, a vision of loneliness giving way to love, then to loneliness again; it's like "Vertigo" remade in a sedately haunted style of Japanese lyricism.
  5. A succulently entertaining movie that invites you to splash around in the dreams and follies of folks so rich they're the 1 percent of the 1 percent. It's like a champagne bath laced with arsenic.
  6. An amazing thing -- a work of cinematic art in which form and structure pursues the logic-defying (parallel) subjects of dreaming and moviegoing.
  7. One of the year's most original and emotionally profound movies masquerades as the tiny story of a young couple who take a backpacking trip in the Caucasus Mountains the summer before their wedding.
  8. Up in the Air is light and dark, hilarious and tragic, romantic and real. It's everything that Hollywood has forgotten how to do; we're blessed that Jason Reitman has remembered
  9. If Going Clear were a Hollywood thriller, I’d complain that it’s too over-the-top. But this is real life, which is hard to believe. And it’s disturbingly good.
  10. The film sweeps us up like a thriller, forcing us to at least ask whether terrorism like the ELF's (which targeted property, never human lives) might ever be justified.
  11. It's a feat of star acting, and it helps make (500) Days not just bitter or sweet but everything in between.
  12. The biggest takeaway from Kelly & Cal, a wonderfully honest and tender film about the bitter pill of adulthood, is Hollywood's criminal underuse of Juliette Lewis.
  13. It took writer-director Samuel ''Shmulik'' Maoz nearly 30 years to make this disturbing, visceral, personal film.
  14. It's a film of jaw-dropping virtuosity and pleasure, one that leaves you revved, enthralled, tickled, moved, and amazed.
  15. Harrison Ford as the President of the United States is such a perfect piece of casting that it's at once a fantasy and a joke: The joke is how perfect the fantasy is. [25 Jul 1997, p. 48]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  16. It's a potent and moving experience, because by the end you feel you've witnessed nothing less than the birth of a soul.
  17. Lusciously revealing fly-on-the-wall portrait of Anna Wintour.
  18. (Denis's) visual style is hypnotic, rapturous, and she makes barren landscapes look gorgeous, hard men look vulnerable.
  19. Lindhardt, sweet and childish and achingly vulnerable, gives a stunning performance.
  20. It's raunchy, outspoken -- and also a smart and agile dissection of art, fame, and the chutzpah of big-budget productions.
  21. A riveting and unexpectedly inspiring essay on the peace that comes from shared physical and mental concentration.
  22. By the time The Crying Game is over, you'll never look at beauty in quite the same way.
  23. Miller hit documentary gold when he met Levitch. But this marvelously structured, sensitively edited, deep and compassionate portrait (in atmospheric, made-for-Manhattan black and white) of one man hopscotching a fine line between verbal genius and psychological miswiring is Miller's own jewel, the work of a gifted filmmaker.
  24. Titanic floods you with elemental passion in a way that invites comparison with the original movie spectacles of D.W. Griffith.
  25. Lavish with stunning imagery, the experience will ripple into your dreams.
  26. The most exhilarating movie so far this year. It's made up of many familiar elements -- think ''Monsoon Wedding'' meets ''My Beautiful Laundrette'' meets ''Personal Best'' -- yet before long, you catch on to how buoyant and funny and original it is.
  27. There's no denying that when it comes to communicating a certain delirious romanticism of character shaped by thousands of hours spent sitting in the dark, the artist who made this showpiece is a master.
  28. A highly original Death in Venice-scented comedy drama written and directed with flair by British feature novice Richard Kwietniowski.
  29. Lords of Dogtown is a docudrama, rare in its grit and authenticity, that also strives for the mythical youth-rebel excitement of something like "8 Mile."
  30. Douglas Tirola’s doc about the satirical bible’s rise and fall is fascinating, funny, smart, juvenile, tragic, and likely to offend just about everyone. It’s a must-see for anyone who cares about comedy.
  31. If you can appreciate the sight of two totally dialed-in performers simmering until they boil over, that's enough. And P.S., that's pretty much the definition of jazz.
  32. With a taut and timely screenplay by Taylor Sheridan, Sicario is a brilliant action thriller with the smarts of a message movie.
  33. By the end, Campion views all her characters with a compassion bordering on grace, a humanity-like her heroine's-as dark, quiet, and enveloping as the ocean.
  34. The superb screenplay won an award at Cannes this year for good reason.
  35. The conclusion of Peter Jackson's masterwork is passionate and literate, detailed and expansive, and it's conceived with a risk-taking flair for old-fashioned movie magic at its most precious.
  36. Brims with life and loveliness even as it meditates on the loss of childhood.
  37. Dazzlingly beautiful, funny, and meaningful.
  38. But it is the steady accretion of hundreds of small moments in this elegant, high-spirited, intensely satisfying production -- the director's third American movie, but the first to approach the dazzle of his Hong Kong stuff -- that, toted up, makes everything right about this des- perately welcome thriller.
  39. Only Yesterday may have been released in 1991 and take place in 1982 and 1966, but Taeko’s reflection on girlhood is truly timeless.
  40. An exquisitely fun documentary.
  41. Waltz With Bashir has transcended the definitions of ''cartoon'' or ''war documentary'' to be classified as its own brilliant invention.
  42. Argo is never less than wildly entertaining, but a major part of its power is that it so ominously captures the kickoff to the world we're in now.
  43. The Past, is hugely ambitious — it's Farhadi seizing his moment — yet it's also a wrenchingly intimate tale of lives torn asunder by forces within and without them.
  44. Anyone who loved Gone Girl the book will walk out of Gone Girl the movie with a sick grin on their face. You can stop being nervous.
  45. The movie is a rare uncensored postcard from a ruined place, a document at once depressing and hideously beautiful that sketches the real hardships of trampled people -- specifically women -- with authority and compelling simplicity.
  46. Almereyda excises big chunks of plot to shape his vision, but retains Shakespeare's language and pays such rigorous attention to meaning and subtext that what's missing isn't missed.
  47. A great, searching, incendiary chronicle of the Sex Pistols, the razor-hearted visionaries of punk anarchy.
  48. David Simon, creator of "The Wire," who argues that the targeting of minorities, fused with mandatory sentencing, has turned the war on drugs into ''a holocaust in slow motion.''
  49. Jaoui neatly, gently, firmly slips political commentary into Let It Rain's articulate mayhem.
  50. The beauty of Two Girls and a Guy is that it presents us with a hero so craven, so indefensible in his duplicity, that his twin victims leapfrog past vengeance into an almost physical state of curiosity.
  51. More than a million people have been displaced in central China in the cause of generating electrical power to meet the needs of the future; Jia's flowing river of a picture washes over a few of them as they adjust to life's currents in the present.
  52. A work of intimate and wrenching humanity.
  53. "Andy Warhol" makes you see that beneath the gargoyle hipster mask, he filled that emptiness with an art of transcendent sincerity.
  54. A marvel of warm collaboration and shared jokes about husbands and wives, shot both in dreamscape color and pristine black and white.
  55. The movie version, directed with unobtrusive precision by James Foley, stays amazingly true to the play's feisty spirit.
  56. It would be hard to imagine a movie about drugs, depravity, and all-around bad behavior more electrifying than Trainspotting.
  57. What matters is that Tiana triumphs as both a girl and a frog, that dreams are fulfilled, wrongs are righted, love prevails, and music unites not only a princess and a frog but also kids and grown-ups.
  58. One of the wonders of the holiday season.
  59. Fruitvale Station is great political filmmaking because it's great filmmaking, period.
  60. There's an adult life force in every frame of this luxuriously paced work, even in the sight of rain and a lady's stocking.
  61. Visually dazzling and morally devastating.
  62. Food, Inc. is hard to shake, because days after you've seen it, you may find yourself eating something -- a cookie, a piece of poultry, cereal out of the box, a perfectly round waxen tomato -- and you'll realize that you have virtually no idea what it actually is.
  63. It's a fluid cinematic essay, rooted in painstakingly assembled evidence, that heightens and cleanses your perceptions.
  64. A comedy of the ridiculous in which the ridiculous turns unexpectedly sublime.
  65. In the end, cancer may have cruelly taken Roger Ebert's voice, but it couldn't silence his greatest gift: his ability to speak to his audience directly, honestly, and with empathy. Thumbs up.
  66. The enthralling spirit of Dave Chappelle's Block Party, its mood of exuberant democracy, extends to every rap and soul performance in the film.
  67. Loving, Playful, and spectacularly well made, Super 8 is easily the best summer movie of the year - of many years.
  68. Working from a superb script by Paul Attanasio, Redford has caught the way a show like Twenty-One offered a carny-barker version of the American Dream.
  69. ''Documentary'' is too impersonal a word and ''visual poem'' is too mushy a phrase to describe Of Time and the City, a short, beautiful, characteristically sublime memory piece by the great British auteur Terence Davies.
  70. Sensational and accomplished.
  71. A madcap gem.
  72. Munich, Steven Spielberg's spectacularly gripping and unsettling new movie, is a grave and haunted film, yet its power lies in its willingness to be a work of brutal excitement.
  73. There's piercing sadness, and fury, too, in this Everyman's isolation, and Cantet is singularly skilled at evoking the universal condition of such tragic ordinariness.
  74. Footnote is itself a perfect little piece of Talmud, full of text, commentary, and colorful argument.
  75. Fincher has made The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo into an electrifying movie by turning the audience into addicts of the forbidden, looking for the sick and twisted things we can't see.
  76. A spooky, heartbreaking documentary.
  77. It's also one of the great movies of the year - an ambitious, challenging, and creatively hot-blooded but cool toned project that picks seriously at knotty ideas about American personality, success, rootlessness, master-disciple dynamics, and father-son mutually assured destruction.
  78. Almodóvar's masterwork, is a spectacular synthesis of everything that has always interested him -- proud women, lovely boys, beautiful drag queens, grand movie stars, gorgeous frocks, wild wallpaper .
  79. Stunning, unsettling, beautifully written drama.
  80. If you see only one comic love story from Kazakhstan this year, choose this prize-winning honey.
  81. Yes, Locke is a bit of a storytelling stunt: For the entirety of the movie, Ivan is the only character on screen. But even with nothing to cut away to and no flashbacks to offer context, the film manages to stay as tight as a vise.
  82. This stunning movie -- one of the very best of the year -- makes a much read American classic feel new and freshly devastating.
  83. The very opposite of a storybook romance, and also the very model of a great comedy for our values-driven time.
  84. Fast, convulsive, and densely exciting new British gangster thriller.
  85. The film catches us by surprise in its moving portrayal of the love between Larry and Althea, played by Courtney Love in a performance that glides from kinky abandon to stark tragedy.
  86. You could trawl the seven seas and not net a funnier, more beautiful, and more original work of art and comedy than Finding Nemo.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Steven Spielberg overcame the lumpy plotting of Peter Benchley's novel to create an efficient, graceful fright machine in Jaws.
  87. A bold, searching, wrenching experience. It may be the most complexly impassioned message movie Hollywood has ever made.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  88. David Gordon Green's captivating winter-chill tragedy, is a tale that encompasses murder, divorce, adultery, alcohol abuse, mental breakdown, and the disappearance of a small child. In other words, it's downbeat enough to make the recent Oscar-nominated films look like party games.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    But it's Polanski who pries the genre open until it goes metaphysical.
  89. A true-life adventure that turns into a one-man disaster movie - and the darker it gets, the more enthralling it becomes.
  90. Bestows generous blessings on all that's good in Englishness, in moviedom, and, of course, in cheese.
  91. A movie of staggering virtuosity and raw lyric power, a masterpiece of terror, chaos, blood, and courage.
  92. A work of staggering intelligence and emotional force -- a mosaic of broken dreams.
  93. The School of Rock was made by gifted veterans of the American indie scene, but it's still the most unlikely great movie of the year.
  94. No one charts the wilds of childhood more precisely than the Dardennes.
  95. Beautifully led by birdlike Sylvie Testud as an ailing young woman in a wheelchair, every character (pilgrim and helper alike) exhibits a soul. And shaped with confident talent by the Austrian filmmaker, every serenely composed shot matters.
  96. Stunning and compassionate period drama.
  97. Davis Guggenheim’s latest documentary is a forceful and exquisitely made piece of advocacy journalism.
  98. Hersonski quietly and insistently unravels reality from "reality"; her commitment to archival authenticity is its own tribute to those no longer able to testify.

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