Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,467 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Standing in the Shadows of Motown
Lowest review score: 0 Bigger Than the Sky
Score distribution:
5,467 movie reviews
  1. xXx
    Even in the summertime, the most restless young audience deserves the dignity of an action hero motivated by something more than franchise possibilities. Movies like XXX -- a big 000 -- don't deserve our $$$.
  2. Isn't it time Steve Zahn grew up? Ever since the '90s, this walking quirk of an actor has pushed his dazed solipsistic zaniness (he's like Michael J. Fox’s hillbilly cousin), but he's 41 now, and it no longer looks cute on him.
  3. An indistinct romantic-dramedy-ish something or other about the rekindled romance of an actress (Rachel Bilson) and her childhood best friend (Tom Sturridge).
  4. Labored miscalculation of a teen-trend comedy.
  5. Sends comedy backward in time, and we're in the 1970s, ethno-sitcom style: These Andersons in their out-of-date white, snooty gated community apparently confuse themselves with their forebears on The Jeffersons.
  6. The loserville teen comedy Underclassman is like a student project sloppily cribbed from other kids' notes -- kids who have seen "Rush Hour" and still can't get over how funny it is to stick a noisy black guy in a distinctly nonblack setting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    The goal here is cynical satire. The result, sadly, is just a yawn.
  7. Somehow, it actually looks cheaper than "Paranormal Activity." It's less funny, too.
  8. A crappy thriller gussied up with a chrome-plated veneer.
  9. Instead of rooting for Pullman and Fonda, we end up praying that the crocodile is hungry enough to put them out of their misery.
  10. The movie is trash shot to look like art imitating trash.
  11. Stripped of the pleasures of terror, flattened of grandeur (with a tacked-on coda that fairly groans with storytelling defeat), the movie sinks from the weight of its own heavyhandedness.
  12. Just because A Walk to Remember is shrewd enough to activate girlish tear ducts doesn't mean it's good enough for our girls. They're willing to buy tickets; why not honor their wits as well as their wallets?
  13. The laughs are few in this inert, ungenerous comedy.
  14. Randall Miller (Bottle Shock), appears to be trying to cross a bad Elmore Leonard thriller with a bad indie-festival family-angst comedy. He gives us the worst of both worlds.
  15. It's a dismal mess...What's most grating about Hackers, however, is the guileless way the movie buys in to the computer-kid-as-elite-rebel mystique currently being peddled by magazines like Wired.
  16. It's young-Hollywood-driven business as usual in this derivative, nasty, and ultimately empty drama.
  17. The film completely misses what should have been its real target -- the filming of Game of Death, a martial-arts campfest worthy of Edward D. Wood Jr.
  18. What Emily doesn't do, though -- what this slow-moving, sour, sloppily assembled teen drama doesn't allow her to do -- is make her predicament of any emotional interest.
  19. The movie may be more bogus than a Gucci bag for sale on a Fifth Avenue sidewalk, but at least the backgrounds are real.
  20. Director Peter O'Fallon fires his biggest gun: a blast of Mozart's Ave Verum Corpus, truly heavenly music wasted on a handful of dust.
  21. Regardless of your personal views, Expelled's heavy-handed bias (a visit to Darwin's home gets the same eerie music as a tour of Dachau) is exasperating.
  22. Even with lowered expectations toward escapist fare taken into account, the film is a long slog, with Marsden and Bracey conveying little but Crest smiles and smolder, while Liberato and Monaghan are stuck doing endless cry-face.
  23. Isn't a movie, it's Gorgonzola, a crumbly summertime stinker veined with pop-cultural fungus.
  24. It's like "Schindler's List" crossed with "The Sound of Music," and Roger Spottiswoode directs it in a stiff, lifeless, utterly dated style of international squareness.
  25. It's the sign of an empty, depressing experience when the only tension is over Bob's choice to use a power drill or a weed whacker for his next kill.
  26. You can expect a lot of shredding and gurgling. 30 Days of Night is relentless, but it's also relentlessly one-note.
  27. Vampire in Brooklyn is a horror comedy that mixes lame blood-pellet effects with lame gags, and it clunks along on a series of interchangeably deserted streets that manage to look dank and overlit at the same time.
  28. The United States of Leland is tedious yet infuriating, since its characters, all of whom seem to have emerged from a screenwriter's manual, are like exhibits in a thesis meant to indict the middle class for the crime of its collective dysfunction.
  29. Bucky Larson is a one-note joke played over and over and over.

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