Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,426 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Ponyo
Lowest review score: 0 Corky Romano
Score distribution:
5,426 movie reviews
  1. The film takes off from formula elements-it's yet another variation on "Die Hard"-but it manipulates those elements so skillfully, with such a canny mixture of delirium and restraint, that I walked out of the picture with the rare sensation that every gaudy thrill had been earned.
  2. A delicate yet haunting movie, a meditation on friendship, on the roots of bohemianism, on the sad comedy of madness.
  3. Jennifer Baichwal's gorgeous documentary Manufactured Landscapes amplifies the powerful work of Edward Burtynsky, a Canadian artist who specializes in large-scale photographs of terrain transformed by civilization into rivers and tides of industrial ugliness.
  4. Trier's compassion for what it takes to survive, mixed with the love he bestows on Oslo, is rewardingly profound.
  5. It's a work of art that deserves a space cleared for its angry, nervous beauty.
  6. Arenas' life zigzags before us in a manner as heady and unpredictable as it must have felt to the man who lived it.
  7. In The Beaches of Agnès, you get addicted to watching Agnès Varda watch the world.
  8. A marvelous rock doc that manages to be wistful, tasty, and jam-kicking at the same time.
  9. It's a lovely, original, Australian take on a climactic moment usually thought of as all American.
  10. A memory of the automobile in which a father drove away from his family provides the title for Blue Car but no hint of the power of writer-director Karen Moncrieff's superb feature debut.
  11. Presents Glass as a masterfully corrupt fabulist who convinced himself of the ultimate seductive lie, which is that there can't be anything wrong with telling people what they want to hear.
  12. A confidently original, engrossing interpretation.
  13. An existential chain reaction, yet as remarkable as his cinematic gamesmanship is the way that he traces the anatomy of feeling in Lola.
  14. Can be interpreted politically or even biblically or not at all, as the elemental struggles between dominance and submission, impulse and action, man and nature, father and son, play out to their stunning conclusion.
  15. This is a great film, and a triumph of creativity and courage over repression.
  16. The most resonant and haunting movie I've seen this year.
  17. Fierce, loving, and electric, this movie's got bite as well as bark.
  18. It's hard to think of the last time a Pixar film made you go ''Wow!'' That's part of why The LEGO Movie is such outrageous and intoxicating fun.
  19. The Girlfriend Experience is one of Steven Soderbergh's bite-size, semi-improvised, shot-on-DV doodles (like Bubble or Full Frontal), and it's the best one he's made.
  20. The lightness with which Buñuel was able to insert the little jokes and knife stabs of surrealism he loved so much is, in fact, divine.
  21. The title embraces the richness of Kechiche's beautiful film, which captures the rhythms of displacement and hardship, the bond of family meals, and even the daily routines of the magnificent women who are part of Slimane's life.
  22. Like a great novel from a more expansive bygone age, The Best of Youth is full of big thoughts; like a great soap opera, it's also full of sharp plot turns, vibrant characters, and great talk. It is, in short, the best of cinema.
  23. The Wizard of Oz remains the weirdest, scariest, kookiest, most haunting and indelible kid-flick-that's-really-for-adults ever made in Hollywood.
  24. A deeply straightforward yet beautifully crafted documentary.
  25. A film of wonderful looseness and innovation. Set free to film fakes, the director is the real thing.
  26. Bleak, brilliant, and unsparing.
  27. A triumph -- Demme's finest work since "The Silence of the Lambs," and a movie that tingles with life.
  28. No
    The movie — the third in a trilogy of powerful political dramas from Larraín, including "Tony Manero" and "Post Mortem" — uses period detail, archival footage, and '80s-era technology to create an excellently authentic, bleached, crummy-looking document of a great democratic accomplishment.
  29. Bold and brilliant.
  30. Errol Morris may have been put on earth to make The Fog of War, a stunning portrait of Robert S. McNamara that closes a year of outstanding nonfiction movies on a high note.

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