Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,511 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Happiness
Lowest review score: 0 Three to Tango
Score distribution:
5511 movie reviews
  1. Those Oompa-Loompas are the beat, and soul, of Burton's finest movie since "Ed Wood": a madhouse kiddie musical with a sweet-and-sour heart.
  2. Jim Carrey's performance is an impersonation on the level of genius.
  3. Room 237 makes perfect sense of "The Shining" because, even more than "The Shining" itself, it places you right inside the logic of how an insane person thinks.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It boasts a more consistent tone, better special effects (such as villains throwing buses around like paper planes), and even an affecting love story.
  4. This is the rare movie that gets you to fall in love with characters you don't even like.
  5. Naples-born Servillo is a national star, famed as a theater, opera, and film director as well as an actor. And he's got the face of a mensch (or a Madoff) -- which makes his embodiment of criminal banality all the more identifiable, as well as horrifying.
  6. Remains the only rock & roll film that exerts the saturnine intensity of a thriller.
  7. A gaily funny, shrewdly inventive satire.
  8. Like David Lynch, Quentin Tarantino, and Paul Thomas Anderson, Solondz revels in ironic pop passion. It's a signature moment when he transforms Air Supply's "All Out of Love" into a geek-love rhapsody.
  9. The movie is pulp, yet it attains a surprising emotional power-especially when Anjelica Huston's Lilly, a survivor who'll do whatever it takes to master her surroundings, is on-screen.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Another harsh character study, with poignant echoes of "Taxi Driver."
  10. Spielberg restages the Holocaust with an existential vividness unprecedented in any nondocumentary film: He makes us feel as if we're living right inside the 20th century's darkest-and most defining-episode.
  11. Someone has finally done it -- made a sexually explicit feature that is also a genuine and harrowing work of erotic drama.
  12. Half Nelson offers an opportunity to marvel, once again, at the dazzling talent of Ryan Gosling for playing young men as believable as they are psychologically trip-wired.
  13. Ferguson spotlights two massive mistakes: the looting that was allowed to continue, destroying Iraqi infrastructure and morale; and--far more revelatory -- the apocalyptically stupid decision to disband the Iraqi army, sending half a million angry soldiers into the streets.
  14. A love poem to the New York City of the '50s and '60s, when Smith, the visionary of camp (Andy Warhol stole from him), more or less invented performance art.
  15. It becomes as savage as ''Reservoir Dogs,'' ''The Killing,'' or any of the other dozens of films over which it still casts a shadow.
  16. It's in all the moments where little happens that Reichardt is most amazing, investing even a gas-station pit stop with perfect emotional pitch.
  17. It's Swank, however, who's the revelation. By the end, her Brandon/Teena is beyond male or female. It's as if we were simply glimpsing the character's soul, in all its yearning and conflicted beauty.
  18. A movie of uncommon sweetness and delight.
  19. True art is a journey to somewhere you've never been, and there has never been a movie quite like Breaking the Waves.
  20. Don't let unpleasant personal dental associations stand in the way of seeing a luminous specimen of independent filmmaking.
  21. No dramatic feature has ever come quite this close to the matter-of-fact ugliness of the Nazi crimes.
  22. Beautiful, wise, and poker-faced comedy of discombobulation.
  23. The film is at times harrowing to watch, yet it's also wry and delicate and absorbing. It's infused with the messy excitement of imperfect passion.
  24. For bleakness, the movie can't be beat -- nor for brilliance.
  25. Clint Eastwood's profound, magisterial, and gripping companion piece to his ambitious meditation on wartime image and reality, "Flags of Our Fathers."
  26. It's cleansing to see the facts laid out with intimacy and rigor, and the film earns the comparison it makes to the squelching of due process for some of today's terror suspects.
  27. Unusual, unhurried tour de force--a seamless match of strong artistic vision and physical performance. [19 Dec 1997, p. 52]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It all comes down to one scene: John Cusack, standing at dusk, boom box aloft, blaring Peter Gabriel's ''In Your Eyes'' outside Ione Skye's window. This, friends, is what rapturous, heartrending, soul-spinning love is all about.

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