Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,125 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Swingers
Lowest review score: 0 Boys and Girls
Score distribution:
5,125 movie reviews
  1. Blue Valentine is lushly touching and gorgeously told.
  2. What it does have is an overwhelming bittersweet melancholy at the passing of life from middle age into…well, you could call it late middle age.
  3. The stunning, must-see drama Crash is proof that words have not lost the ability to shock in our anesthetized society.
  4. Facing a diagnosis of Alzheimer's, the older woman enrolls in a poetry class, desperate to find the words to describe beauty before language fails her. She does even better: She herself becomes a kind of poem about what it means to really see the world.
  5. The Wizard of Oz remains the weirdest, scariest, kookiest, most haunting and indelible kid-flick-that's-really-for-adults ever made in Hollywood.
  6. Temperamentally in sync with her "Wendy and Lucy" director, Michelle Williams plays one of the toiling wives. And the actress, with her calm center, compresses the entire history of frontier wifeliness into the concentration with which she gathers firewood and loads a musket.
  7. She's an Everywoman you can believe in, showcased in the kind of deft comedy of feminine passion - where deep despair meets Wilson Phillips - that a great many people have been waiting for. Now that Wiig and company have built it, will they come?
  8. Loving, Playful, and spectacularly well made, Super 8 is easily the best summer movie of the year - of many years.
  9. The film sweeps us up like a thriller, forcing us to at least ask whether terrorism like the ELF's (which targeted property, never human lives) might ever be justified.
  10. At 88 minutes, Tabloid is short and sweet (it's pure movie candy), but by the end we've forged an emotional connection to Joyce McKinney at the deep core of her unapologetic fearless/nutty valor. And that's what really makes a great tabloid story: It's a vortex that's also a mirror.
  11. Nothing more (or less) than an enchanting light comedy of romantic confusion... It's a movie that understands love because it understands pain.
  12. This enveloping dream of an epic narrative experiment comes from the great Chilean-born, France-based filmmaker Raúl Ruiz (Time Regained).
  13. A movie masterpiece...is Lars von Trier's ecstatic magnum opus on the themes of depression, cataclysm, and the way the world might end.
  14. A marvelous movie.
  15. The setting is somewhere between a post-WWII Brigadoon and the environs of Marcel Carn classic "Children of Paradise," but the story is as timely as this morning's news from Europe.
  16. Merrily outrageous, over-the-top fun.
  17. Another beautifully chiseled piece of filmmaking - sharp, funny, generous, and moving.
  18. Oren Moverman's Rampart is a terrific film: tense, shocking, complex, mesmerizing.
  19. Fincher has made The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo into an electrifying movie by turning the audience into addicts of the forbidden, looking for the sick and twisted things we can't see.
  20. Ghost Protocol brims with scenes that are exciting and amazing at the same time; they're brought off with such casual aplomb that they're funny, too.
  21. Farhadi is no mere formalist. His film is a spiritual investigation into the rise of women and the descent of male privilege in Iran, and a look at the toll that has taken. In a movie of flawless acting, it is Moadi - terse, proud, angry, haunted - who shows us that rare thing: a soul in transition.
  22. Rees presents this vivid, hidden culture with raw honesty.
  23. The result, in Pina, is...wow.
  24. Loosely based on real events, this harrowing, superbly made drama by fast-rising filmmaker Gerardo Naranjo (I'm Gonna Explode) is Mexico's 2012 submission for Best Foreign Language Film - rightfully so.
  25. This is a great film, and a triumph of creativity and courage over repression.
  26. Footnote is itself a perfect little piece of Talmud, full of text, commentary, and colorful argument.
  27. No one charts the wilds of childhood more precisely than the Dardennes.
  28. In this typically exquisite, nuanced, memory-infused work from master British filmmaker Terence Davies, we believe every minute of the torment of Hester (Rachel Weisz).
  29. He (Spurlock) takes Comic-Con seriously. He talks to Kevin Smith, Harry Knowles, and other famous grown-up geeks, but mostly he follows a handful of people whose dream it is to pass through the fan/professional looking glass and carve out a place for themselves in the industry of fantasy.
  30. Trier's compassion for what it takes to survive, mixed with the love he bestows on Oslo, is rewardingly profound.

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