Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,467 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 A Decade Under the Influence
Lowest review score: 0 Star Wars: The Clone Wars
Score distribution:
5,467 movie reviews
  1. For sheer dramatic wallop outpowers virtually every fiction feature I've seen this year.
  2. It's Ejiofor's extraordinary performance that holds 12 Years a Slave together.
  3. In the Shadow of the Moon finds new resonance in the moment when America redefined progress -- but also when it heeded the siren song of a world so desolate it reminded you what a paradise ours truly is.
  4. It's the first Hollywood Iraq movie to remind me of a Vietnam film like Coming Home, and it does more than disturb. It scalds, moves, and heals.
  5. This thrilling stop-motion animated adventure is a high point in Selick's career of creating handcrafted wonderlands of beauty blended with deep, disconcerting creepiness.
  6. This is Robert Redford doing what too many stars should do and don't: taking a chance. And reinventing his art. It's an extraordinary thing to see.
  7. A no-frills docu-Dogma plainness, yet Miller lingers on invisible, nearly psychic nuances, leaping into digressions of memory and desire. She boxes these women's souls right open for us.
  8. A movie as layered and enthralling as its subject.
  9. Brokeback Mountain is that rare thing, a big Hollywood weeper with a beautiful ache at its center. It's a modern-age Western that turns into a quietly revolutionary love story.
  10. Madly original, cheekily political, altogether exciting District 9.
  11. Think of this witty, economically gory little tour de force as "28 Days Later" written by linguist Noam Chomsky.
  12. As he rises to each challenge, you realize that von Trier, the most exalted of prankish sadists, has orchestrated the filmmaking equivalent of the story of Job. The Five Obstructions glories in art, life, and the faith that binds them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A hypnotically engrossing thriller that spins along on the dreams and anxieties of its characters.
  13. A funny and madly arresting new documentary.
  14. A doozy of a French gangster pic that, in its beautifully refurbished and pithily resubtitled re-release, turns out to be one of the highlights of the 2005 movie year.
  15. Rohmer treasures the undervalued glories of discourse and the intimacy of conversation over the obviousness of action or sexual display.
  16. Dizzily rich, witty, and satisfying.
  17. David Cronenberg's brilliant movie -- without a doubt one of the very best of the year.
  18. Thanks to Gabe Polsky's enthralling new documentary, we finally get to see these athletes for who they really were—it humanizes a group of men who were cast by history in the role of villains.
  19. J.M.W. Turner was a master of light and image, but what stands out most about him in Mike Leigh's captivating biographical film is a sound. Playing the renowned Victorian-era English painter, Timothy Spall grunts and expectorates his way through his scenes, chugging along with the phlegmy belch of an old jalopy or, as the film suggests more than once, a snuffling pig.
  20. It taps into every parent's worst nightmare — the horror of being unable to protect an out-of-control child.
  21. If ever there were an actor ripe to ''McConaughnesize'' his career, it's Jude Law — and guess what, he has done it, spectacularly, in Dom Hemingway.
  22. Eastwood directs Mystic River with an invigorated grace and gravitas. This is a true American beauty of a movie, a tale of men and their bonds told by and for adults who value the old-fashioned Hollywood-studio notion of narrative.
  23. To call Match Point Woody Allen's comeback would be an understatement - it's the most vital return to form for any director since Robert Altman made "The Player."
  24. Tsai builds this shimmering story with deft, deadpan wit and a warm, understated love of the absurd, both in life and afterlife.
  25. It's a mad cycle of arrogance and despair, and Bloody Sunday etches it onto your nervous system.
  26. It whisks you to another world, then makes it every inch our own.
  27. To say that Eastwood, who directed, has done a first-rate job of adaptation fails to do him justice. What he's brought off is closer to alchemy.
  28. A small cubist masterpiece about crime and punishment set in that most split-level of environments, Los Angeles.
  29. There are moments in A Little Princess--particularly Cuaron's Indian play-within-the-play, which is nearly avant-garde in its conception--when you may just want to clap from pleasure. My advice to you is: Go ahead, you're a grown-up. [26 May 26 1995]
    • Entertainment Weekly

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