Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,509 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Thirteen
Lowest review score: 0 Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium
Score distribution:
5509 movie reviews
  1. Antal has assembled what may be the single most colorless group of mangy lowlifes I have ever seen.
  2. Isn't up to much of anything besides pretending that swearwords and snot-nosed insults, served up by Santa with an almost institutional monotony, aren't just naughty. They're -- big joke! -- incorrect.
  3. A few more films like Tears of the Black Tiger, and kitsch will be on its way to having a bad name.
  4. Why would filmmakers with this much talent work this hard to thumb their noses at everything they put on screen?
  5. While it won't win any Oscars, Matthew Cooke's new documentary How To Make Money Selling Drugs may take the prize for being the shallowest and most glib film of the year.
  6. I gave up making heads or tails of Synecdoche, New York, but I did get one message: The compulsion to stand outside of one's life and observe it to THIS degree isn't the mechanism of art -- it's the structure of psychosis.
  7. A glumly serious British mock rock doc: You could forgive the paucity of jokes if Brothers of the Head had anything to say, or if the '70s-vérité surface were remotely convincing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    The goal here is cynical satire. The result, sadly, is just a yawn.
  8. Watching Pecker, his rickety new comedy about a teenage Baltimore shutterbug, it becomes clear that Waters has grown color-blind to his own sleazo-shock aesthetic.
  9. If, as Fincher has said, this movie is supposed to be funny, then the joke's on us.
  10. It's one of those stultifying aftermath-of-
a-car-crash movies.
  11. A brutally monotonous thriller.
  12. You'd think that the film would ask you to be appalled at this scenario of forced servitude -- but no, it's treated as harmless and cute, like an Israeli ''Chico and the Man.''
  13. It has that vintage Polish pace, their signature arch pomposity and rhythmless weirdness, only this time the brothers had to go and make a cosmic allegory of American dreams.
  14. Inert dud of a hitmen-are-people-too comedy.
  15. It's both exhausting and laughable in its eagerness to shock. That's the bad news. The worse news is that Volume II comes out next month.
  16. A Scottish weepie of such bathos and balderdash that it deserves a drinking game in its rotten honor.
  17. The result is a dead pile of information in search of a movie.
  18. Since there is a mystery, the movie might have been entertaining camp had director Taylor Hackford staged it with pace, style, or a whisper of surprise. Instead, the plot just clunks forward-for two hours and 10 minutes.
  19. The wedding, which turns the very concept of ''Greek'' into the sort of hideous, pandering clichés that look rejected from bad Jewish and Italian sitcoms.
  20. Whenever an actress takes on a gritty working-class role, the audience does a gut check of authenticity. Either the actress gets it, like Melissa Leo did in "Frozen River," or she doesn't, like Michelle Monaghan as the spoilin'-for-a-fight truck-driver heroine of the inert indie dud Trucker
  21. Have there ever been two less energetic stars than Eric Stoltz and Annabella Sciorra? Casting this diffident duo in an allegedly romantic comedy proves disastrous; they suck the air out of virtually every scene.
  22. I love a good mind-bender, but it's getting more common these days to see thrillers that don't so much bend your mind as chop it, smash it, and place it in the Cuisinart. Trance, the new film directed by Danny Boyle is a high-brainiac art-world thriller that wants to do nothing more (or less) than give your head a majorly pleasurable spin.
  23. A portentous and goopy Dutch drama.
  24. How could a movie about a great screenwriter have such a terrible screenplay?
  25. Labored miscalculation of a teen-trend comedy.
  26. Holland's empurpled bio-fantasy is hooey with an anachronistic feminist slant from start to finish.
  27. If you look hard, you can make out a story in Femme Fatale, but it has nothing to do with the senseless pileup of jewel thievery, shutterbug voyeurism, and leggy sex bombs so shallow and bad they seem to have come out of a 1978 copy of Hustler magazine.
  28. An unctuous rom-com that runs its characters through every plastic cliché of a pre-Oscar McConaughey vehicle, ultimately causing us to root against the vacuous couple and their predetermined happy ending.
  29. A fractious fiasco: whiplash camera movement set to raging blasts of death metal, a story so incoherent it made me wish I was watching, instead, the collected outtakes from Van Helsing.
  30. The movie lacks even the misplaced fervor of obsession. It's lifeless kitsch.
  31. What's on screen is lazy, second-rate, phoned-in -- a heist in which it's the audience whose pockets have been picked.
  32. I wish I could say that the film is half as intriguing as it sounds, but A Woman, a Gun... lacks the Coen brothers' precision, their diabolical game-board cleverness. It's a remake in shaggy outline only.
  33. Most of this just seems, you know, so three years ago, so "Bourne" again.
  34. This kingdom really should be forbidden.
  35. Parts of the film play like the world's slowest and most insensitive reality show (Who Wants to Be an Octogenarian?).
  36. It's the sign of an empty, depressing experience when the only tension is over Bob's choice to use a power drill or a weed whacker for his next kill.
  37. So badly told that it ends up dissecting a corruption that exudes from nowhere but itself.
  38. In every way dreadful.
  39. A notorious opinion divider last year at Cannes, Battle in Heaven is less about heaven or battle, or hell on earth, or the soul of Mexico, and all too much about gawking. And so, for all the ''shock'' of the movie's clinical carnality, this battle is lost.
  40. This Debbie Downer of a drama is a bitter slog.
  41. Back to the Future Part III has that same sort of studio back-lot clunkiness. Only this time it's the audience that gets conked — by the sheer desperation of the whole enterprise.
  42. The film is proof that if you repackage the classics (in this case, Dickens) for the youth market in an era of MTV dislocation, what you get, in essence, is postmodern Cliffs Notes with an alt-rock soundtrack.
  43. The gooey sanctity of the bond between fathers and sons all but nullify Jackson's zesty performance.
  44. An appalling, jaw-dropping movie that will cause serious nightmares.
  45. Three stories by the guy who wrote Trainspotting, banged and smashed into a film by Paul McGuigan with none of Trainspotting's charm and all its grotesquerie.
  46. Antonio Banderas is a charming and talented man, but in Take the Lead he lays on the old-world panache so thick - the accent, the flowery courtliness, the romance of romance - that he comes off like Dracula's metrosexual cousin.
  47. McCarthy's rawhide has become movie Naugahyde, a substance unknown in literature or in nature.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, it's impossible to tell from this confused mess (costarring Jakes as himself) what that message is.
  48. A magical-realist sitcom war farce that ends up being about nothing but its own slovenly smugness.
  49. Director Sean Ellis has a lovely eye, but he's set the film in his blind spot. Not only can't he distinguish between art and porn, savoring and wallowing, universal truths and exhausted clichés -- he doesn't even seem interested in these distinctions.
  50. Insistently sullen, nihilistic, and successful to the point of smugness at transmitting buzzkill, Art School Confidential is the second collaboration between art-house cartoonist Daniel Clowes and director Terry Zwigoff.
  51. I don't know if it's ickier to assume that writer-director Brad Silberling (Moonlight Mile) thinks the culture-clash jokes he pushes in 10 Items or Less are charming because they're earnest, or because they're tongue-in-cheek. Either way, this sale is void.
  52. None of the faux icons comes close to being a character. Instead, they are contrasted with a group of nuns who skydive without parachutes. Could this possibly be a metaphor for Korine's filmmaking? It certainly goes splat.
  53. You can expect a lot of shredding and gurgling. 30 Days of Night is relentless, but it's also relentlessly one-note.
  54. Nothing in Imaginary Heroes rings true, least of all a plot that lightly combines domestic abuse, adulterous pregnancy, teen bisexuality, job abandonment, and a possible case of Mysterious Movie Disease. These are not ordinary people. Or real ones.
  55. The film values quips and declamations over natural conversation (or an explanation of how such intelligent women could have been so blind to world events).
  56. Has a topsy-turvy sense of injustice.
  57. British director Mike Barker and magpie New York screenwriter Howard Himelstein, have taken "Lady Windermere's Fan" - Wilde's first big stage success, written in 1892 - and pulped it senseless in the name of puttin' on the charm.
  58. A ponderous dystopian bummer that might be described as "The Road Warrior" without car chases, or "The Road" without humanity.
  59. Yes indeed, Pirates 2.0 is a theme ride, if by ride you mean a hellish contraption into which a ticket holder is strapped, overstimulated but unsatisfied, and unable to disengage until the operator releases the restraining harness.
  60. For all of De Palma's studious multimedia trickery -- a valid, even inspired idea -- Redacted is so naive it's an embarrassment.
  61. The only performer I enjoyed watching was Martin Short, who plays a bitch dandy music teacher with a smile so fake that the comedian seems to be acting with his gums.
  62. Fragmentation can be an artful method; it can also be the last refuge for someone who scarcely knows how to make a film. In the no-budget fantasia Wild Tigers I Have Known, the fragments are like a borrowed collage of gay coming-of-age tropes.
  63. In a season of digital bombast, it can be a relief to walk into a stodgy life-of-the-great-man costume drama. Goya's Ghosts, before it turns into a messy, horse-drawn load, achieves a civilized stuffiness that gives off its own mild pleasure.
  64. You can see what the film was going for, but the jokes just sit there; you chuckle a few times, mostly out of lame hope, but you never bust a gut, never really get what you came for.
  65. Has Brian De Palma finally lost his mind? Ever since "Carrie" (1976), his one true masterpiece, this director has evolved into a cinematic serial killer of common sense.
  66. Starts out as a neo-Pygmalion comedy, but the film is slow, earnest, and rhythmless.
  67. Nothing in John Carter really works, since everything in the movie has been done so many times before, and so much better.
  68. The movie wants to be deadly cool, but mostly it's just deadly.
  69. Stupefyingly tedious and annoying.
  70. It's like the worst movie Jean-Claude Van Damme never made.
  71. Anderson has made a zombie movie without the zombies.
  72. The most irritating thing about Hoffa is that even after you've sat through Danny DeVito's turgid, meaninglessly sprawling account of the Teamster boss' rise and fall, you still won't have any idea who Jimmy Hoffa was.
  73. Top-heavy with whimsy, so muddled it makes Mission: Impossible look like a model of narrative cohesion, The Saint is the apo-theosis of the new incoherence, with the cliches of espionage and action thrillers jammed together like bumper cars.
  74. Isn't it time Steve Zahn grew up? Ever since the '90s, this walking quirk of an actor has pushed his dazed solipsistic zaniness (he's like Michael J. Fox’s hillbilly cousin), but he's 41 now, and it no longer looks cute on him.
  75. Shainberg reduces this most disturbing of all photographers to a portraitist of Halloween.
  76. There's something uniquely embarrassing about a rock & roll fable that is no more authentic (and no less coy) than an episode of ''The Monkees'' yet insists on presenting itself as the epitome of rebel-yell cool.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    The plot twists fall about as weightily as the fake snow.
  77. Commits the cardinal sin of too many modern movies: It never gives the audience a clue why any of these people were ever attracted to one another in the first place. [30 May 1997, p. 54]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  78. Really, all this movie is about is the joy of checks, calls, folds, rivers, and the acquired thrill of knowing what those words mean.
  79. Because the script, riddled with verbal ugliness by David Elliot and Paul Lovett, sends the movie to a series of arbitrary nowheres, the final showdown for the Mercer boys and their enemies is just as meaningless and sense-deadening.
  80. It's like a film-school thesis gone disastrously wrong.
  81. An Unfinished Life is inert, kaput -- a middlebrow mush of platitudes rather than an okay corral of distinct characters with heartbeats. It's awful not in an exciting, uncontrolled way but in an overly controlled, narcotized way.
  82. It's like "Schindler's List" crossed with "The Sound of Music," and Roger Spottiswoode directs it in a stiff, lifeless, utterly dated style of international squareness.
  83. Angel-A shows how director Luc Besson can be French in a way that even the French might despise...Quel ick. And très tedious.
  84. Simon Pegg has what it takes, but he's saddled himself with a script (co-written by Pegg and Michael Ian Black) that Adam Sandler wouldn't have pulled out of his bottom drawer.
  85. Really, the sole favor Dolman does the plucky Hawn is to light her rear end so that its continued gloriousness can be appreciated.
  86. It's no insult to Melville to say that he wrote, in effect, the original ''Dilbert.'' This movie, unfortunately, makes ''Dilbert'' look like Melville.
  87. This is a deeply unpleasant movie masquerading as a heartfelt social commentary on life in these United States.
  88. Every porridgy inmate in this instantly forgettable romp warbles in the prison's amateur musical, and one of them demonstrates a rather extreme devotion to the tomatoes he grows in the on-site greenhouse.
  89. A jaw-dropping misfire. The dialogue is laughably pretentious, the plotting is virtually nonexistent, and the performances are so broad and cartoony that you keep wondering if it's all some sort of prank.
  90. Ultimately, the talented cast -- among them M. Emmet Walsh, Faye Dunaway, Skeet Ulrich, and Viggo Mortensen -- play to their easiest star turns rather than their most interesting strengths.
  91. Serves up the sort of shrill ''satire'' of middle-class Jewish vulgarity in which the mere mention of words like ''brisket'' and ''klezmer'' is automatically presumed to be hilarious.
  92. Mr. Magorium, who is 243 years old (so are his jokes), is a cross between Willy Wonka and Geppetto, but Hoffman plays him with little more than a goofy dumb lisp, achieved by tucking his lower lip under his upper teeth, so that he looks just as rabbity-stoopid as he sounds.
  93. Is there anything more dull than an ineptly cynical fairy tale?
  94. The main problem? Raid lacks a center. It's an exhausted sprawl with multiple story foci, none of them terribly compelling.
  95. xXx
    Even in the summertime, the most restless young audience deserves the dignity of an action hero motivated by something more than franchise possibilities. Movies like XXX -- a big 000 -- don't deserve our $$$.
  96. The movie is so littered with clichés of genre, as well as clichés of artifice in Reeves' pained performance, that any semblance of social reality goes foul.
  97. Critics tend to fawn over the Japanese director-star Takeshi Kitano (a.k.a. Beat Takeshi), but am I the only one who finds his films impossible to make heads or tails of?

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