Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 3,161 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 80% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 19% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 77
Highest review score: 100 Kill The Moonlight
Lowest review score: 0 Playing With Fire
Score distribution:
3,161 music reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Down two members - but up one exclamation point - Panic! at the Disco return to the surging electro-emo sound that first made them Hot Topic heartthrobs on Vices & Virtues.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Dipset's gruff second-in-command serves up a new set of drugged-up hustler tunes. [15 Apr 2011, p. 87]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Light Me Up is clearly built from the doll parts of that era's grunge goddesses --a sometimes too-slick conceit that Momsen's thousand-Marlboro growl still manages to sell surprisingly well.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    On Helplessness Blues, their second disc of intimate, obsessively crafted folk, the bearded Seattleites take a giant step forward in their quest to turn the clock backward.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The Glee star gets help from all the right places on his pop debut, collaborating with sure-shot producers and songwriters responsible for hits by Kelly Clarkson and Panic! at the Disco.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Even on All Things Bright and Beautiful's grandly titled "The Yacht Club," he laments that his heart "can't harbor this paddleboat."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    It hits hard, but the boyish energy of their early work is still missed. [3/10 Jun 2011, p.112]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    In solo mode following a two-decade stint with Brooks & Dunn, the country star sticks to what he knows: road songs, love songs, songs about how every once in a while you've gotta drink enough whiskey to kill a horse. [3/10 June 2011, p. 112]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    More of the inoffensive same from the friendly folk-popper. [24 Jun 2011, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    It's a shame that Palaceer Lazaro uses his nee project to spit flimsy verses about back-in-the-day cliches. [1 Jul 2011, p.74]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Cook must think the greatest era of rock history was between 1995 and 1999, when bands like Better Than Ezra and Our Lady Peace pumped alt radio full of post-grunge jangle. Both of those bands' frontmen have co-writing credits on the former Idol victor's second album, This Loud Morning.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The glitch distortions and keyboard drones are well chosen, even when guest readers (including a woman from Eno's gym) prove hit and miss.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    No hooks on their 10th album are big enough to snag newbies, though melancholy anthem "Weightless" comes closest. [29 Jul 2011, p.72]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The Long Beach ska punks have a new singer, a more melodic mellow bounce--and a lot less edge. [22 Jul 2011, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    They sound like they're on the same page only during fleeting moments, and when those slip by, listening inevitably is more frustrating than fulfilling.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Those are rare flashes of heart, though, on an album that 
 ultimately feels colder than its sweat factor suggests. Those are rare flashes of heart, though, on an album that 
ultimately feels colder than its sweat factor suggests.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Cobra were more fun as party crashers than they are as VIPs.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    If SuperHeavy never quite answers that question [What the f--- is going on?], the group certainly has fun dodging it in bluesy soul-rock jams smeared with reggae grooves and Bollywood strings.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Well, there's a half-dozen good ones on his fourth full-length Sweeter (check the title track). Too bad the other half's weighed down by painfully mopey, girl-done-left-me blues.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The lyrics focus on moving on, but their music can't seem to break the tether to yesterday.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    He swings hard, but often misses--perhaps his biggest problem is that he's not rooted in any genre outside of people-
pleasing pop.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    A little watery. [7 Oct 2011, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    He loses himself among all the references here, leaving an emptiness at Soul Punk's otherwise vibrant center. [28 Oct 2011, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    While his follow-up's party beats are sturdy, it's frustrating to hear him trade his brainy morality for shoutouts. [11 Nov 2011, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    A typically creepy solo set full of warped guitars and carnival-barker vocals. [11 Nov 2011, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Miller sticks with a cruise-controlled slow burn for most of Blue Slide Park.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The lovelorn lyrics get same-y, and "modern" touches (like snoozy duets with Drake and Beyoncé) show a Blige who doesn't care much about the here and now.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The dozen unearthed tracks here [are] the outtakes of the outtakes. [2 Dec 2011, p.77]
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The savviest musicians here flip Dylan's messages for their own aims, just as Dylan reappropriated protest songs by civil rights heroes....There's just one problem. That leaves 60-something more songs, and an unholy amount of strummy-strummy-strum.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Listeners who come for the trio's Glee-approved breakout ''We Are Young'' will be happy with Some Nights' superior first half.