Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 2,299 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 13% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 The Sopranos: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1766
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1766
1766 tv reviews
  1. If Going Clear were a Hollywood thriller, I’d complain that it’s too over-the-top. But this is real life, which is hard to believe. And it’s disturbingly good. [20/27 Mar 2015, p.95]
  2. A bittersweet valentine, a timely fable about cultural character, Master of None is rich entertainment powered by Ansari’s increasing mastery of his art, his artistic hunger, and the wisdom and skill of his collaborators.
  3. Watching Jerry, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Jason Alexander, and Michael Richards bounce off Larry David makes you realize what Curb had been missing: worthy opponents for Larry to argue and scheme with.
  4. The arc of this character--series creator Vince Gilligan's invention of Walter White as a sick soul--is, it's clear now. one of the great narratives in Television histpory. [13 Jul 2012, p.62]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  5. A sparky new season.
  6. Life With Bonnie teems with so much clever give-and-take and nonstop action it feels as if each half hour is going to burst.
  7. If the hospital staff is desensitized to basic human dignity, the show makes sure its audience never is. [14/21 Nov 2014, p.100]
  8. What's great about the series this season is that you can dive deep into its familiar-yet-fresh bubbling stew of physics, ? numerology, and smoke monsters...or you can just skim across its blinding-sun surface, grooving on the thwarted romances, ?the time-shifting nosebleeds, and how great Kate looks in a business power suit and heels.
  9. It's this series' unique take on realism that can be positively transporting.
  10. In a television landscape where the high jinks of characters like the Fox network's Parker Lewis often define high school life, Degrassi stands out as the thirtysomething of the book-bag set.
  11. The first thing that watching new episodes of Fox's finally returning Andy Richter Controls the Universe does is confirm how utterly lame 98 percent of all other network sitcoms are. The next thing watching them does is make you laugh really hard.
  12. The storytelling structure isn't just artiness for artiness' sake. Instead, it ingeniously reflects the fractured nature of investigations.
  13. Outspoken yet charismatic, politically radical yet traditionalist in his love of family, the man is captured in all his complexity.
  14. Grease: Live defied modesty, transcended nostalgia, served up cheese as a ten-course gourmet meal.
  15. It's an engrossing meditation on the complexities of redemption.
  16. Burns' illuminating series turns the Roosevelt clan into a colorful Wes Anderson movie, albeit one in black and white. [12 Sep 2014, p.56]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  17. Dear White People gives you an abundance of characters to care about and entertains with its inspired, hilarious storytelling. Simien keeps and hones the heightened reality style of his film. The meticulous compositions and meta-awareness are reminiscent of the Coen brothers and Spike Lee.
  18. Each season of this anthology drama tells a new story with a new cast, but McConaughey and Harrelson are so good, you immediately begin grieving the prospect of getting only eight episodes with them. [10 Jan 2013, p.67]
  19. It's TV's richest, most satisfying experience.
  20. Season 4's first three hours make major investments in everyone, especially Gordon, imbuing them all with deeper poignancy. ... Halt and Catch Fire is an urgent story of rehumanization for a cold, wired culture. Plug in now. [18/25 Aug 2017, p.88]
  21. In theory, it all sounds pretty corny and contrived. In practice, The Real World proves to be by far the most beguiling and involving piece of programming MTV has ever offered.
  22. Judging by the first four episodes, though, it’s not only a gripping true-crime story, it’s also the most moral one I’ve seen in a long time.
  23. I don't know about you, but I'm not used to laughing out loud alone in front of the TV. Honestly, I was startled.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As ever, it's all in the details.
  24. The show may not click with everyone, but it left me electrified.
  25. Heady satire full of humanity, I Love Dick is lovably challenging. [12 May 2017, p.50]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  26. The new Sopranos is as good as it's ever been -- ruthlessly emotional, cuttingly funny and frightening.
  27. Like previous standout seasons The Amazon and Marquesas, Pearl Islands once again features a perfect mix of good and evil.
  28. The best friends double down with absurd antics that would make even their season 1 selves blush. [16 Jan 2015, p.70]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  29. The yuk-filled second ep of the sophomore season rectifies this neglect with a plot that tempts Jeff to return to his soul-corrupting old firm, much to the dismay of his community-college study buddies.
  30. Smart, unruly, and very fast, Arrested is the ultimate TV series for our TiVo age.
  31. It sounds heavy, yet the premiere is as buoyant as it is deep, light as it is layered. It is many things at once, including absolutely fantastic.
  32. The pleasure to be taken from 'Office' isn't merely that of laughter -- it's the pleasure of watching a piece of entertainment so perfectly made and so delicately acted.
  33. I'll admit, I was a wee bit worried after last season's annoying Georgina story line and relentless drama about the past that haunts Serena (Blake Lively). But fear not, groupies: Summer's been good to this Girl.
  34. There are funny moments and heartbreaking ones on this fascinating docuseries. [13 Jul 2012, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  35. Tremendously clever fun, Masterpiece Mystery! presents the first of three modernizations of the Sherlock Holmes tales.
  36. There are many ways in which Ed, the best new show of the season, could have been perfectly awful.
  37. The Deuce is an absorbing, resonant chronicle about the evolution of dehumanizing skin trades and the mainstreaming of adult entertainment.
  38. A season that adds great depths to the bawdiest, wisest relationship comedy that isn't You're the Worst. [28 Apr/5 May 2017, p.101]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  39. Olyphant is surrounded by a terrific supporting cast, including Dirty Sexy Money's Natalie Zea as Raylan's ex-wife and Nick Searcy (Deke Slayton in From the Earth to the Moon) as his deceptively cornpone boss. But in the end, it comes down to hard stares and that combination of drawled amusement and sudden violence that make him so cool yet exciting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    HBO debut both gaffaw-worthy and eye-opening. [16 Oct 2015]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  40. The beauty part of The Larry Sanders Show is its subtlety—a kind of sophistication and knowing wickedness that compliments its knowing audience.
  41. Exceptionally clever, cunning satire. [21/28 Aug 2015, p.95]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This series is officially on fire now.
  42. This is one of the sharpest, most purely pleasurable television series ever. ... What began in 1987 (as animated filler between sketches on The Tracey Ullman Show) has become one of the medium's most dependable entertainments, a cartoon that transcended cartoonishness a long time ago.
  43. They say analyzing comedy kills it, but in this case, it's one revelation after another. Add rare footage of their early years, some non-Python TV appearances, tense on-set footage filmed during the making of their movies, and clips of their greatest hits, and you've got Monty nirvana.
  44. A searing, humane drama that succeeds at making urgent, artful pop culture by engaging the world, not looking away from it.
  45. A sprawl of engrossing setup. [4 Apr 2014, p.61]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  46. The sadistically hilarious summer fave returns for a new run filled with snowy, wintery obstacles (''Nana's House'' and ''Snowplow Sweeper'' are ice-cold brutal) and John Henson's subversively salty quips.
  47. It's the riotous rhythms and bold attitude that drive the premiere, and it's fudging hysterical. [15 Apr 2016, p.48]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  48. Orange Is the New Black might be the closest thing we have to Charles Dickens right now: a sharp denunciation of an arcane system, driven by hardscrabble characters with whimsical names that define who they are and what they like.
  49. [David Simon's] new six-part miniseries is another masterwork of storytelling that's both miniaturist and epic in scale. [14 Aug 2015, p.50]
  50. Killing and sanctioned philandering aside, The Americans’ depiction of marriage is as profound as ever. Other developments augur more potential shift.
  51. The best worst series on TV. [30 Sep 2005, p.89]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  52. Thankfully, it gets a deeply satisfying last hurrah here.
  53. By the end of the opening hour, you're already engaged by Coach Taylor's challenge to turn the East Dillon stragglers into guys who can complete the phrase ''Clear eyes, full hearts, can't lose'' without mumbling. And Friday Night Lights is headed for more touchdown episodes than you can count.
  54. I'd say that The Fall is a deeply moral crime thriller, but that description is too boring for a drama that's electric with suspense and erotic tension and pulpy cliff-hangers. Anderson's performance is riveting.
  55. Thanks the lord Mary Berry that literally nothing has changed about the contest's winning formula. ... [A] rosewater-infused layer cake of TV delight. [1 Jul 2016]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  56. Deadwood has become one hell of a great gimmick-free Western.
  57. There’s a precision in the show’s expansion, a sense that the creative team wants to explore every corner of their comedy world--and every corner of the character’s psyches. Season 3 builds to one of the funniest, weirdest, and most profound moments I’ve ever seen in a television show--and that’s before the season finale.
  58. Four words: Best. Eviction. Episode. Ever. The only thing that could have made it even more delicious? Zombie Chenbot.
  59. The artistic achievement of Treme is that it blends bluntness with the nuances of gorgeous music.
  60. A 21st century thirtysomething for a TV generation that likes a splash of high concept in their shows and isn’t afraid of melodrama.
  61. Rugrats is such a witty, original show parents don't mind watching it with their children.
  62. [A] beautifully crafted, tough-minded hour ... I'll Fly Away has already lived up to its hype as the season's strongest new drama.
  63. Not since Freaks and Geeks has adolescent humiliation been handled so warmly.
  64. There’s something communal about Schumer’s approach to comedy. It’s not just about punchlines. It’s about conversations. And she makes the women around her seem funnier, just by letting them in on the joke. Some of the best moments happen when she’s interviewing people, inspiring the type of real talk you don’t often get to hear once you’ve outgrown the girls’ locker room.
  65. Quite aside from the fact that, snicker for snicker, belly laugh for belly laugh, it's probably the funniest show on television, Seinfeld is also one of the purest of all TV-viewing pleasures. This sitcom ... is blissfully free of creaky plots, trumped-up romances, and wise-mouthed kids. ... You get the feeling these days that Seinfeld, [Larry] David, and frequent director Tom Cherones are striving for a show in which the laughs flow with unceasing ease. Each week, they get a little closer; be there when it happens.
  66. It's not a nice show, but it's so damn good. ...Leary has invented simply one of the best characters on TV.
  67. The funniest sketch-comedy series since SCTV, In Living Color is also the hippest show on TV.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There's only one downside to loving this series — after legal eagle Harvey Birdman struts his stuff in the courtroom, it's hard to take Law & Order seriously again.
  68. We're taught that good drama relies on characters changing over time. Here, McDormand proves that a character's refusal to change can be just as compelling, and she hints at that stubbornness in exquisitely subtle fashion.
  69. C.K. is writing, directing, and starring up a storm here, and his usual opening-segment stand-up routine, involving nearsightedness, is funnier than most sitcoms are in an entire season.
  70. Going deep allows Armisen and Brownstein to really dig in--the duo deserve Emmy attention, IMHO--and enhances, not diminishes, Portlandia's winningly weird shine. [9 Jan 2015, p.74]
  71. By the end, it's unclear which of these people are alive or dead, literally or spiritually. But The Returned still qualifies as a new zombie classic--a haunting tribute to the lost loves who feed on your brain forever.
  72. Bloom’s ingenious anti-rom-com was one of last year’s best shows. It might be even better this year.
  73. With her winning combo of nonchalance and pluck, Handler comes across as a perverted best friend confessing last night's drunken antics. The routine is shamelessly vulgar, but the profanity is judiciously placed.
  74. I love how smart and snide Silicon Valley is about ambition, and I love how the show’s actors imbue their geeky cut-outs with winsomely flawed humanity that allows us to care about them even as they undercut each other and themselves in their pursuit of success and significance.
  75. The best new series that few people in America are likely to watch. ... Stiller and his small cast of writer-players ... don't make fun of one thing at a time: They combine their subjects, creating rich layers of ridicule.
  76. For all its bleakness and darkness, there's a glowing exhilaration about this series: It's a feel-good show about feeling really bad.
  77. After you watch a Larry Sanders show, the rest of television seems like it's on Prozac — smooth and edgeless, where Sanders is prickly and nervous.
  78. The second season of Murphy Brown was even better than the first, expanding the parameters of its characters' behavior and providing lots of belly laughs.
  79. Laura Dern and Mike White continue their bold, hilarious, tremendously moving exploration of Amy Jellicoe's ongoing attempt to give meaning to her life. [18 Jan 2013, p.74]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  80. I didn't think Better Things could get any better. It's thrilling to be wrong. [15 Sep 2017, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  81. A terrific two-parter that features aliens, Richard Nixon, and crackling dialogue. [22/29 Apr 2011, p.92]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  82. The show nails a stellar one-two punch, playing the rapid-fire barbs exchanged between the pigeon and Queensberry against Tyson's straight-ahead buzz-saw gags.
  83. It possesses a different rhythm from any other show on TV. [13 Apr 2012, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  84. How pleasurable it is to really care about a TV series, to the point of (national) obsession.
  85. Anger provides a terrific balance of hearty historical context and unflinching immediacy, and is as much about human endurance as it is career accomplishment. [3 Jul 2015, p.655]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  86. Larry Sanders has always contained an undercurrent of tragedy in its portrait of a pathetically insecure man whose work is his life, and whose life is one long, uncomfortable commercial break. Fearlessly, Shandling and his cowriters are pushing Larry to the edge.
  87. A series with as much emotional punch as The Sopranos.
  88. Josh's anxiety may occasionally drive you mental. But then, if you can fully appreciate the brilliance of this quarterlife-crisis suicide comedy, you may already be a little mental. So that's nice.
  89. thirtysomething has always been agreeably open-ended, full of rambling, shaggy-yuppie stories that never conclude decisively. That's what drives some viewers up the wall, and entrances others.
  90. The whole show is complicated in a fun, brain-teasing way, and having seen the second episode, I can say it only gets funner. I know that's not a word, but I'm saying it anyway.
  91. It has the best tough-guy dialogue around and an acting ensemble that's ferociously effective. Face it: Homicide is a killer.
  92. The most extraordinary show of the new TV season. ... It is a blessed relief that Life portrays things that have become 'issues' -- teenage drinking, unwanted sexual advances -- without turning them into moments of preachment. ... And I haven't even made it clear that this is also a really funny show. Just watch this thing, will you?
  93. It's rich with beautifully crafted scenes that capture the distance, anger, and confusion of a fragmenting family and souls in flux. [10/17 Jul 2015, p.101]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  94. Tig
    Candid and funny. [10/17 Jul 2015, p.103]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  95. The Simpsons has never been better. At a time when half-hour TV comedy is reaching a new level of self-referential daring — you can't fully appreciate the intricate, in-joke pleasures of great shows like NBC's Seinfeld and HBO's The Larry Sanders Show unless you've also watched a lot of really bad TV — The Simpsons continues to emphasize that there's a big world out there that television barely touches upon.
  96. The fifth and final season of David Simon's peerlessly acted, stunningly scripted, revolutionary drama of 1,000 moving parts kicks off Jan. 6.

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