Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 2,106 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 14% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Mad Men: Season 7
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1612
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1612
1612 tv reviews
  1. The X-Files is hitting the ground running—albeit knee-deep in murk and murder, conspiracy and cosmic confluences.
  2. The underrated bigamy show returns from a too-long hiatus with a plot-packed season 3 opener, and, not for the first time, the females deliver the best moments.
  3. Its main purpose is to confront the taboo, and whether that means exploring just how far Louie will go into the "experimental" side of masturbation in the season premiere or simply digging into his ugliest prejudices about overweight women, the show can be revelatory.
  4. This may be the first TV show since Pee-wee's Playhouse to treasure youth even as it embodies all of its contradictions, craziness, hopes, and fears (and I'd like to point out that Freaks is the only hour-long sitcom I've ever seen that sustains funniness for its full 60 minutes).
  5. Who killed Laura Palmer? Many viewers, tired of the hype, are saying, Who cares? I say it too, but as praise. Plot is irrelevant; moments are everything. Lynch and Frost have mastered a way to make a weekly series endlessly interesting.
  6. Seinfeld is now a revitalized show, snappy and gratifyingly complicated once more.
  7. This series has become as dependably amusing as any show on television.
  8. Hannigan gets a preemptive EW Emmy award for best supporting actress this year. Whether weeping over a breakup with her werewolf boyfriend, Oz (Seth Green), or offering dating advice to Buffy suitor Riley Finn ('She likes cheese!'), this Willow does not bend from the challenges she's been handed.
  9. It's becoming obvious that The Simpsons, now in its second season, isn't just a product of media hype: Matt Groening's cartoon family is one of the few current works of popular art that possess wit and integrity.
  10. The terrific thing about the new season, starting with the introduction of Weaver [Laura Innes], is that personalities on ER have become as complicated and messy as brain surgery.
  11. Well into its third season, X-Files shows no sign of flagging inspiration; its ability to find paranoia in the paranormal appears to be limitless.
  12. New Girl stokes comeback hopes with an inspired season 4 premiere.
  13. Miraculous ... One of the myriad greatnesses of The Sopranos is that, to paraphrase the Godfather paraphrase that Steven Van Zandt's Silvio frequently quotes, it keeps pulling you back in — back in on yourself, appealing to your basest instincts, to your fundamental urge to hear a bloody story well told.
  14. The playful atmosphere of Now and Again provides a blissful kick unlike anything else in prime time.
  15. Slowly, a smartly constructed epic is taking shape.
  16. Homicide seems to have found just the right balance: Almost every week, it is as well acted and tough-minded as it ever was, while also offering the sort of snappy stories that can grab any viewer looking for merciful relief from the mannered eccentricity of that icky Picket Fences.
  17. Lean and gratifyingly mean ... uncommonly sharp.
  18. An enthralling recollection of a tragic mess with a long legacy, The People v. O.J. Simpson fits our moment like a glove.
  19. Fresh reporting and candid interviews make the trial newly compelling and illuminate its outcome. But it's the lesser-known players, including jurors and marketing agents, who provide provocative insights into the tragic saga of compounding historical injustices that implicate all of American culture. [3/10 June 2016, p.100]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  20. It's loose and rambling; its dramatic climaxes don't coincide neatly with the conclusion of any given episode. Its dialogue, overseen by creator David Simon ... is so good it often sounds improvised. One criticism of the show I've read is that it's repetitive (in showing the slow process of how the police bring down bad guys). But what those critics don't get is that those qualities are exactly what make 'The Wire' the funkiest cop show on TV.
  21. Hannibal captures your imagination with the prospect of Graham using his imagination to figure a way out. [28 Feb 2014, p.65]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  22. Six hours of raucous laughter, bone-rattling suspense, and god-awful tragedy. ... The Corner is a marvel of craft.
  23. There's a sense in which the lag in time between the third and fourth seasons has resulted in scripts that have been too carefully crafted; the ironies and parallelisms are sometimes overworked, excessively neat. ... Still, 'The Sopranos' -- bursting with livid energy and daringly rotten at its core -- is full of scenes that'll leave you breathless in their audacity, goofball non sequiturs, and profound cynicism.
  24. You know this Dr. Who spin-off aims to please when the return of Capt. Jack Harkness (John Barrowman) isn't even the big news.... With [Capt.] John [James Marsters] adding such a fun, unhinged element, it's a shame these two crazy kids broke up in the first place.
  25. If Brotherhood isn't as brilliant as The Wire, it's just as believable. The cast is so solid.
  26. Horgan and Delaney, who wrote the show together, play their characters off each other to perfection. The result may well turn out to be the worst--by which we mean the best--new comedy of the year. [19 Jun 2015, p.56]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  27. The sheer number of plotlines can be overwhelming, but the images--flowers dropped on the side of the road, a dusty van sliding away--are relentlessly riveting. And the series only gets better from here. [5 Oct 2007, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  28. The mystery of just what happened to the child unspools almost languidly against the backdrop of wild and gorgeous New Zealand country. The ugliness of humans amid such beauty resounds like a cold slap.
  29. The film is a wonderful trip down the magazine's fabulosity-paved memory lane.
  30. A propulsive, plot-driven narrative and performances remarkable for their emotional depth and physicality keep you constantly engaged. A strong imagination for the slave experience—their ambivalence about the Revolutionary War; their attitudes about love, family, religion—yields dramatic richness and cultivates great empathy.

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