Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,716 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Murphy Brown: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Ghost Shark
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1301
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1301
1,301 tv reviews
  1. It's grim but exhilarating: a portrait of an artist chronicling despair.
  2. Ken Burns' documentary about the "black blizzards" that swept across the Great Plains during the 1930s is at once rigorously sourced and heartbreakingly emotional.
  3. The plots are twistier than a fishtail braid and only lag when the conversation turns to energy. [25 Jan/1 Feb 2013, p.112]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  4. The film is a wonderful trip down the magazine's fabulosity-paved memory lane.
  5. [An] absorbing spy thriller. [25 Jan/1 Feb 2013, p.113]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  6. Even though you come away with no new insight into the case, the fine performances by Lowe,Revolution's Elizabeth Mitchell (as another prosecutor), and The Office's Oscar Nuñez (as Anthony's lawyer) make this TV movie far more compelling than you'd expect.
  7. Hannibal takes our own fixation on psycho-pop and serves it back to us in a dish full of flavor. Bon appétit, horror freaks.
  8. You'll be pining for more once it's over. [1 Mar 2013, p.62]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  9. Broadchurch is a gripping portrait of small-town paranoia.
  10. The mystery of just what happened to the child unspools almost languidly against the backdrop of wild and gorgeous New Zealand country. The ugliness of humans amid such beauty resounds like a cold slap.
  11. The lack of polish makes Vice all the more riveting. [5 Apr 2013, p.63]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  12. It is possible to argue that, although Louis C.K. has created a work of genius with the FX show Louie, what he's really good at is stand-up. Oh My God offers further evidence for the thesis.
  13. This excellent, Robert Redford-narrated look at both the Watergate scandal and the film it inspired backs up the comic's [Louis C.K.'s] assertion about politics never being more insane.
  14. The result is a compelling portrait of a man who was, in every sense, incendiary.
  15. The series doesn't have a plot so much as a beautifully tangled web of deception, cruelty, and faded hopes. ... There are times when EZ Streets seems like the world's longest Bruce Springsteen video.
  16. In a recent interview, Apatow said that he cast Undeclared before writing the pilot, which may be a key reason why the show is so cohesive: Apatow and his staff had specific acting rhythms in mind, resulting in a show that, right from the pilot, radiates a sure sense of each character's quirks.
  17. A must-see for fans of Broadway's favorite redheaded orphan.
  18. The setup is slow, but the show captures shadowy Coulson, sarcastic Grant (Brett Dalton), combat vet Melinda May (Ming-Na Wen), and Fitz (Iain De Caestecker) and Simmons (Elizabeth Henstridge), whose superpower is Britishness. Bonus points for wry dialogue by co-creator Joss Whedon. [20/27 Sep 2013, p.144]
  19. [Ryan Murphy's] sharp take on a woman's role is both funny and mordantly serious.
  20. It's a smart show that plays dumb at first, just to get your attention. Masters may not yet be as groundbreaking as the true drama that inspired it. But like Betty, it knows how to fake it until things get real.
  21. Season 2 is just as brainy and twisty and kinky [as season 1], and it ratchets up the suspense by making the threats to our "heroes" even more personal.
  22. While Seduced and Abandoned may be hard to categorize, it is easy to sum up: amazing.
  23. It's a beautiful mess. Don't miss it. [29 Nov 2013, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  24. Cosmos captures the imagination anew by celebrating imagination itself as an essential tool for a deeper, more truthful understanding of life. [7 Mar 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  25. Horton Foote's 1953 teleplay proves as durable as ever in this transfer of 2013's hit Broadway revival. Cicely Tyson is as fiercely magnetic on a small screen. [7 Mar 2014, p.62]
  26. As in Office Space, the heart of the show is watching Richard and his friends struggle to make sense of themselves and their purpose. They're good, weird guys you want to hang out with.
  27. Host Nate Berkus grounds it all with the real families whose lives are being transformed. [21 Mar 2014, p.59]
  28. The science/star-power combo lends both a sense of urgency and a cinematic sparkle. [11 Apr 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  29. Night One felt almost fully-formed, as if Oliver has spent his Daily Show tutelage making a list of everything that works-- and everything he wanted to do just a little bit differently.
  30. Credit the winning cast, especially Volk, and executive producer Carter Covington's sweet/snarky tone for a half hour viewers won't have to pretend to love.

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