Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,694 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Community: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Justice for Natalee Holloway: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1282
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1282
1,282 tv reviews
  1. The action picks up shortly after the season 2 finale.... Elsewhere, sex! [28 Feb 2014, p.65]
  2. Overall, it’s a whole lot of premise-setting and foundation-building, but there’s enough here to be optimistic that this will be one more tick in the Good column of movie/TV synergy.
  3. Surviving Jack--based on Justin Halpern's memoir I Suck at Girls--distinguishes itself with a terrific turn by Christopher Meloni as the father and a refreshing treatment of gender roles.
  4. They reunite to help Bletchley alum Alice in a personal matter that grippingly involves an illegitimate child, a chemical spill and top secret military documents. [11 Apr 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  5. Orphan Black has much on its mind, and maybe too much going on. But it knows to play to its amazing strengths--most of which are named Maslany.
  6. While not all of the ensuing skits work as well, plenty of gags land, ahem, hard. [18/25 Apr 2014, p.102]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  7. The dark absurdist tone doesn't land quite as cleanly as in the film, and there's the enormous absence of goddess Frances McDormand, who brought such great plainspoken heart to the movie's otherwise bleak landscape.... But do keep watching, because the show boasts unique and satisfying hooks.
  8. With a season-long focus on a single case, the story has plenty of breathing room, and the San Francisco setting feels particularly natural. As unnecessary things go, Murder is exquisite. [13 Jun 2014, p.75]
  9. Imagine Borat's vibe with Summer Heights High's spirit--definitely worth a peek, if that's your cup of tea. [20 Jun 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  10. A pretty spry police procedural. A lot of the credit goes to the chemistry between stars Chyler Leigh (the Brooklyn-raised detective) and Jacky Ido (the French-born cabbie). [27 Jun 2014, p.57]
  11. Masters may be set in the 1950s, but its politics don't need to live there as well. Luckily, the conversations between the women are just as juicy as last season.
  12. This series has the time (and inclination) to really unravel the softening dynamic between its romantic atheists.
  13. We can confirm that it boasts a string of crackerjack performances from the likes of Stephen Rea as a hangdog spy, Janet McTeer as his spook boss, Lubna Azabal as the housekeeper of Nessa's brother (Andrew Buchan), and Gyllenhaal herself. [25 Jul/1 Aug 2014, p.105]
  14. Sins offers an informative, uncondescending glimpse at single-minded desire.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Rapid-fire zingers help ease the bumps of awkward sitcom patter, which will no doubt even out as the ladies find their rhythm.
  15. It vibrates with big-picture vision and has smart fun with its premise.
  16. Marry Me wouldn't work without Wilson and Marino, who make Annie and Jake just cringeworthy enough to be funny.
  17. Forgoing its recent dip into somnambulism, Empire is (literally) all guns blazing again.
  18. All that commotion sets the season on a compelling path, hitting the road with a purpose. This is when Dead is at its best: journeying through postapocalyptic, fun-house-mirror America.
  19. It's sassy and smart, but there's a dark acuity to the humor that fits in with MTV's recent edgy efforts like Awkward.
  20. The cast is charming and there's a refreshing honesty about Cam. [3 Oct 2014, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  21. AHS may no longer have the element of surprise on its side, but it remains, to quote the lyrics of a certain David Bowie tune performed by Lange, the freakiest show. One of us? Count me in.
  22. If the result is less rock & roll, both literally and metaphorically, than the director's films about the Band and Bob Dylan, it features an impressive list of interviewees, including Joan Didion and Michael Chabon.
  23. Benched is more lightweight [than Enlightened], but it's encouragingly funny thanks to Coupe, whose attempts at anger management showcase impeccable comic timing.
  24. Fascinating...Think Neil deGrasse Tyson's Cosmos, but for stuff that's on your block.

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