Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 2,184 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 13% same as the average critic
  • 22% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 NYPD Blue: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Justice for Natalee Holloway
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1670
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1670
1670 tv reviews
  1. The film is a wonderful trip down the magazine's fabulosity-paved memory lane.
  2. A propulsive, plot-driven narrative and performances remarkable for their emotional depth and physicality keep you constantly engaged. A strong imagination for the slave experience—their ambivalence about the Revolutionary War; their attitudes about love, family, religion—yields dramatic richness and cultivates great empathy.
  3. Everwood ain't brain surgery, but that's also what helps make it an easygoing charmer.
  4. This portrait of a profane, low-down egomaniac--excuse me, he prefers "Christ figure"--continues to amaze. McBride's willingness to play depression, amorality, and selfishness for laughs is awesome.
  5. Ferrell's genuine reverence for the national pastime and his noble goal make it a breezily feel-good hour. [11 Sep 2015, p.55]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  6. A devastating deconstruction of the double standards women face in the entertainment industry, and a touching valentine to a grownup friendship that's weathered rough times. [11 Sep 2015, p.56]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  7. The depth of Westworld lies not in asking questions about memory, free will, and what makes us human, but in whether we can become more human than what we let ourselves to be, whether our stories can be richer and more meaningful than what the culture allows.
  8. The Jinx might make amateur sleuths of us all. But judging by this gripping, stranger-than-fiction detective story, Jarecki’s the real thing.
  9. Such a nice surprise: A sharply written show about a mother-daughter relationship filled with vibrant emotions instead of cheap sarcasm.
  10. The series shows the darker side of Belle's work without getting into that porno-punishing crap so often disguised as morality lessons. The series, like Belle, is far too smart to succumb to such an average attitude.
  11. The stunningly shot result will make you wonder at the cruel beauty of nature. [16 Mar 2012, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  12. Though the premiere's ending has been mostly spoiled by the marketing for the new season, every moment watching the hopefuls fight for their dream and navigate the foreign waters of the movie industry--like when the winner demands to shoot the small-budget project on 35mm film--is completely absorbing. [11 Sep 2015, p.56]
  13. Who says TV doesn't make history thought-provokingly exciting?
  14. This political satire operates at a level of sharpness that American television hasn't seen since Robert Altman's HBO miniseries Tanner '88.
  15. All this tension turns out to be great for the show's pulse, which had been fluttering last season. In too many of season 7's adventures, Duchovny and Anderson looked as if they'd been asked to go investigate who shot J.R. Ewing; their boredom was showing. ... [This season's first two episodes discover] a new force field of energy.
  16. The continually surprising comedy returns in fantastic form. [31 Jul 2015, p.55]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  17. It's a very funny show about how hard it is realizing you've become a cliché: the useless husband, the naggy wife, the insufferable couple on the sitcom.
  18. With fewer constraints, the show has more room to breathe, making it feel less rushed and chaotic. [11 Sep 2015, p.56]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    In the second go-round for Seinfeld, the star seems more relaxed and confident, and there's a bracing snap to the byplay between him and his costars.
  19. The jail's real breakout stars remain Lee Tergesen and J.K. Simmons as Tobias Beecher and Vern Schillinger.
  20. It's the fall season's most intriguing, tense puzzler.
  21. This excellent six-part series brings the statesman's [Thomas Cromwell's] shady story to light with wit, empathy, and even surprise. [3 Apr 2015, p.59]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The first of Mad Men’s final seven episodes is as fine as a silky fur, give or take a hilariously hideous period mustache and some too-on-the-nose lines and symbolism.
  22. Keri Russell's title character is one of the few interesting characters on television who's also purely good ... It is one of the great strengths of this series that sap and sentiment are explored with varying degrees of realism, humor, and seriousness that lesser shows shrink from even attempting.
  23. It's a smart show that plays dumb at first, just to get your attention. Masters may not yet be as groundbreaking as the true drama that inspired it. But like Betty, it knows how to fake it until things get real.
  24. It's Quantum Leap meets The Streets of San Francisco--with narry a C, S, or I in sight. [28 Jul 2006, p.56]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  25. A trite, untrue mental-illness mystery insults the show's high IQ, but doesn't diminish the opener's capture-the-imagination thesis: that a redeemed House can be just as compelling as a rude House.
  26. Cosmos captures the imagination anew by celebrating imagination itself as an essential tool for a deeper, more truthful understanding of life. [7 Mar 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  27. While pop-culture touchstones from Dallas to Twin Peaks shrivel up and die, L.A. Law just keeps getting juicier.
  28. Sherman-Palladino writes in such a distinctive 'voice' that denying her the same kind of artistic credit that, say, Aaron Sorkin or David Chase take as their due only hints at the unspoken sexism in the television industry and the press.

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