Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,718 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Roosevelts: An Intimate History
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1303
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1303
1,303 tv reviews
  1. That '70s Show is best when the volatility that truly characterized this period — the sense that the times they were a-changin', to a funky beat — seeps into its golden aura of fun.
  2. Both extremely funny and intelligent.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Funny fabulousness ... [with] a few too many talk-to-the-camera moments.
  3. Family Matters offers a picture of black family life that takes its middle-class ordinariness for granted, which is unusual for TV. Even more unusual, it's a show you can watch with your whole family, and chances are, everyone will get a few good laughs out of it.
  4. The debut episode isn't quite the laugh machine you'd expect from a guaranteed winner wedged between Seinfeld and ER. Clearly, what Veronica's Closet has going for it above all else is Alley's bleep-'em-all blitheness, her gift for turning a tantrum into operatic hilarity.
  5. Home Improvement isn't the best family sitcom — Roseanne still goes further and deeper — but Improvement may be the most comforting.
  6. Sometimes Dr. Katz is a little too early-period Woody Allen — more whines than jokes. But so far, Dr. Katz has proved capable of a brisk originality.
  7. Although Millennium hasn't quite found its tone, it's got great visuals and a commanding performance by Henriksen.
  8. Here's an interesting, uneven, impudent comedy-drama that may well prove to be summer television's most likably eccentric series.
  9. [Vincent] D'Onofrio is so eccentrically entertaining, even his costar Kathryn Erbe seems fascinated. ... Add tight plotting, and CI is the L&O of the year.
  10. Extremely well acted, 'Six' is a show I'll keep watching; I'm just not convinced it'll be sucking up the same pop-culture air that 'The Sopranos' did.
  11. You will feel guilty for laughing so hard, which is, I suspect, precisely the reaction David wants.
  12. It's a testament to Curb's cleverness that what's now rote--Larry offends, we cringe--can still be so surprising.
  13. I defy the naysayers who claim Curb is in a rut: Who cares if it's not reinventing itself? It has become one of the most reliably amusing comedies on TV, taking little annoyances, indignities, and offenses, and worrying at them until they bubble into fantastically overblown debacles.
  14. Although its style is novel, 24 hews to traditional crime-story conventions; you could plop this plot into a two-hour TV movie and be done with it. The advantage of the real-time hour becomes apparent, however, in the depth of characterization achieved by stretching things out.
  15. Really, my only significant complaint about the new '24' is an excessive use of its visual trademark: split-screen images. These are fine when they're used to let you know where major characters are in different subplots simultaneously, but in next week's episode, there's a split-screen shot that separates two characters talking in the same room together!
  16. With Bauer's audience-alienating daughter, Kim (Elisha Cuthbert), sent packing, the snazzy new cast members should keep the series moving at a nice clip.
  17. Let's just say that after the two-night, four-hour season premiere, Jack will have threatened to jab a Bic pen into a bad guy's eardrum, and you'll feel the warm glow of sadistic glee that signals a jolly good start for vintage 24 mayhem.
  18. Fascinating, frustrating, and a little frightening.
  19. Anyone who has worked in an office can identify with the tribalists' permanent state of exhaustion and paranoid mistrust, so Survivor's chief goal in the upcoming weeks is to make distinctive some of the initially rather bland-seeming participants.
  20. Watching Ellie is smart and likable -- it earns its gimmicky premise.
  21. 'Firefly' benefits enormously from Whedon's ability to take the clichés of any genre and give them a good, hard yank.
  22. As uneven as it is, the series is now showcasing some of the best acting on television.
  23. Director John Gulager ... is easily the most intriguing personality in PG history.
  24. Idol is a shamefully addictive cross between Ed McMahon's old "Star Search" and Chuck Barris' hoary, whore-y "The $1.98 Beauty Show."
  25. 'Model' has been tops in quality among the summer's post-'American Idol' talent shows because it requires no actual talent.
  26. Luckily, kooky personalities can still be found in small packages.
  27. 'Deadwood' creates from the git-go a villain for the ages in Al Swearengen. McShane's slicingly deep voice is like a bowie knife stuck in the series' heart, but instead of stopping its action, he brings the show to pumping, bloody life.
  28. Like last season, the plots are thick and quick-flying. (Also like last season, the abstruseness can sometimes feel showy.)
  29. Lilly's first cold case is so TV predictable, there's no way to watch it other than as just an excuse to showcase Kathryn Morris -- to establish her as an indelible presence we'll want to return to every Sunday night.

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