Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,539 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 16% same as the average critic
  • 19% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Community: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 The Pauly D Project: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1161
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1161
1,161 tv reviews
  1. Six hours of raucous laughter, bone-rattling suspense, and god-awful tragedy. ... The Corner is a marvel of craft.
  2. By the end, it's unclear which of these people are alive or dead, literally or spiritually. But The Returned still qualifies as a new zombie classic--a haunting tribute to the lost loves who feed on your brain forever.
  3. Each season of this anthology drama tells a new story with a new cast, but McConaughey and Harrelson are so good, you immediately begin grieving the prospect of getting only eight episodes with them. [10 Jan 2013, p.67]
  4. You won't want to watch this, Yes, it will wreck you. But you'll be grateful you let it. [8 Nov 2013, p.61]
  5. A delicious deep dive into six Stephen Sondheim songs.
  6. Hannibal captures your imagination with the prospect of Graham using his imagination to figure a way out. [28 Feb 2014, p.65]
  7. It sounds heavy, yet the premiere is as buoyant as it is deep, light as it is layered. It is many things at once, including absolutely fantastic.
  8. A sprawl of engrossing setup. [4 Apr 2014, p.61]
  9. Such a nice surprise: A sharply written show about a mother-daughter relationship filled with vibrant emotions instead of cheap sarcasm.
  10. At its best, Friends operates like a first-rate Broadway farce, complete with slamming doors, twisty plots, and intricately strung together jokes. And even when it's not at its best, the crack acting and piquant punchlines give Friends a momentum and charm that win you over even if you're not laughing.
  11. The show's energetic fearlessness in depicting someone who is fearful in her loneliness gives Ally McBeal an overriding purpose. The result is irresistible television, whether you experience it as a sexual-differences safari or as a blueprint for your own life.
  12. It not only has all the classic sitcom ingredients but also adds a new, more refined aggression to the mix.
  13. Sex and violence certainly have their place here, but they're placed in the context of a vivid city that, as dangerous, seamy, and profane as it can be, is a place you want to revisit every week.
  14. King has turned out to be a near-perfect synthesis of Seinfeld and [Everybody Loves] Raymond, recombining many of the best elements of each show into something wholly, delightfully new.
  15. There are times when you wish the jokes in this series were a little funnier, but right now its unique situations — there's comedy gold being mined from Malcolm's gifted-child class of awkward brainiacs — make it distinctive.
  16. An immensely enjoyable, carefully crafted, well-performed creation. Take it from a viewer who has given every Trek incarnation a try and always come away admiring the concept but disappointed with the execution: Voyager hits pay dirt.
  17. The more leisurely pace allows for some singular moments. [17 Mar 2006, p.101]
  18. In its pilot episode, Chicago Hope looked smart but trite — Trapper John, M.D. with book-learnin'. ... [But David E.] Kelley's writing in [the second] episode is worth any number of Picket Fences.
  19. Brooklyn Bridge is beguiling, simultaneously the warmest and most intelligent new show of the season. It's also a vindication of artistic control in the TV industry.
  20. 'Scrubs' is a TV rarity: a new sitcom with an original look and point of view, and the merciful absence of a familiar star attempting a comeback.
  21. [The first episodes are] four of 24's best hours to date. [20 Jan 2006, p.59]
  22. Sure, the new Real World is beating the dead horse of the old one, but its derivativeness carries a fresh sting.
  23. The first season of Real World had a lot of momentum just because of its sheer novelty. The second season began to drag because the El Lay crew proved generally to be self-absorbed bores. But the current Real World benefits enormously from two ticking time bombs: Puck's outrageously boorish behavior, which is destined to set off explosive fights with his roommates; and, more profoundly, Pedro's HIV-positive status, which adds another layer of self-consciousness to this TV project.
  24. Season openers don't get much more incendiary: There are severed feet, a ''beef'' between rival Armenian, Mexican, and Salvadoran gangs, and a murder committed by another member of Vic's Strike Team.
  25. Everwood ain't brain surgery, but that's also what helps make it an easygoing charmer.
  26. When the series premiered in July, 'Reno' looked like a one- or two-joke stunt, a smartly sustained 'Saturday Night Live' sketch. ... As this series has evolved, its format has proven remarkably expansive and emotionally rich, using parodic elements to explore these characters and place them precisely in a social environment.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    For such a quick-witted comedy, the eight episode commentaries aren't as sharp as you'd expect, and Carell is entirely absent. But some three hours of deleted scenes--funnier takes of already hilarious sequences, beefed-up stories for the supporting cast--compensate.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    A trite, untrue mental-illness mystery insults the show's high IQ, but doesn't diminish the opener's capture-the-imagination thesis: that a redeemed House can be just as compelling as a rude House.
  27. Any show that can accommodate decadent cruelty, tragic bravery, and political divisiveness is one you ought to be watching, frakkin' spaceships or not.
  28. The series' brilliant conceit is that enemies are often sane and rational, and many good guys and gals are obsessed, flawed, and ruthless.