Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 2,207 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 13% same as the average critic
  • 22% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 The Sopranos: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Justice for Natalee Holloway
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1690
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1690
1690 tv reviews
  1. Tig
    Candid and funny. [10/17 Jul 2015, p.103]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  2. The Simpsons has never been better. At a time when half-hour TV comedy is reaching a new level of self-referential daring — you can't fully appreciate the intricate, in-joke pleasures of great shows like NBC's Seinfeld and HBO's The Larry Sanders Show unless you've also watched a lot of really bad TV — The Simpsons continues to emphasize that there's a big world out there that television barely touches upon.
  3. The fifth and final season of David Simon's peerlessly acted, stunningly scripted, revolutionary drama of 1,000 moving parts kicks off Jan. 6.
  4. You won't want to watch this, Yes, it will wreck you. But you'll be grateful you let it. [8 Nov 2013, p.61]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  5. Abrams and Lindelof have created one of only two new shows this season at the end of which I was yearning to see a second hour right away. (The other is ABC's "Desperate Housewives": It could be hoot heaven, could be labored camp.) I was tempted to hedge on my final grade, because Lost is the kind of show that could go anywhere. Then I realized that's exactly why I should commit to the ride.
  6. If you're looking for light summer entertainment, search elsewhere. But you won't find anything more invigoratingly original on TV.
  7. How to Get Away With Murder begins with an actual murder--a group of hypercompetitive law students are fighting over what to do with the body--before it flashes back to their first day in Keating's class, quickly establishing each character before discrediting our first impressions.... Thanks to Davis' powerfully layered performance, it's impossible to read Keating.
  8. A six-hour miniseries so ripe with abrupt violence, lush illogic, and slashing humor that it makes most of [Oliver Stone's films] look like -- well, like bad TV movies. ... In its length, scope, sweeping visual tableaux, and over-the-top passion, Wild Palms is more like an opera than a TV show. But then, it's also more like a TV show than the series to which it's most likely to be compared: Twin Peaks.
  9. Every so often a British drama comes along that's so brilliant, you must ride a TARDIS to London just to watch. The cult-favorite sci-fi series Black Mirror is one of those shows.
  10. Roseanne remains endlessly watchable: startling, funny, and complicated.
  11. The Larry Sanders Show is all tension, cynicism, profound shallowness, and naughty-boy bonding — it's just the way you imagine life behind a big-time TV talk show to be, except infinitely funnier.
  12. The best series on TV, period. [15 Sep 2006, p.63]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  13. The four-part docuseries begins with ''The Memory Loss Tapes,'' a moving look at the disease's progression through seven patients at various stages. It's not a question of if you'll cry, it's how soon.
  14. Sin City dazzle adds spice to the cooking competition's season 6 premiere....But it's the fresh crop of cheftestants that'll really whet your appetite.
  15. One of the best things about the second season of Frasier is the way the series has come to mix its high and low humor.
  16. No show this side of Seinfeld loves the language of conversation (the wisecrack, the pun, the withering retort, and the muttered aside) as much. ... Week in and week out, Buffy just slays me.
  17. A delicious deep dive into six Stephen Sondheim songs.
  18. Dark, textured, and lively--this is how Dickens is done. [20 Jan 2006, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  19. Right now, the show is probably as good as it's ever been.
  20. The series is full of surprises ... And as Tony, Gandolfini gives a magnificently shrewd, wary performance. If, like me, you thought you never wanted to watch another Mob story, be sure to check this out.
  21. In the last third of the season, NYPD Blue was as good as it's ever been: more action to go with the already terrific dialogue; more unexpected twists from a show that could have easily let up on its twisting in its second season. ... If you tuned away from NYPD when [David] Caruso left, now's the time to catch up.
  22. Bright Lights is one last home movie for the both of them, more honest and complete in the telling.
  23. If you think Garry Shandling must be running out of ways to deconstruct show business, you're wrong. This will probably prove the most fearless half hour of comedy all year.
  24. Once and Again is worth viewing again and again. This subtle family drama has recently risen to greater heights of emotional richness.
  25. A terrific blastoff. ... Groening, deeply influenced by the paranoid fantasies of writer Philip K. Dick, the dystopian surrealism of the Firesign Theatre, and every cornball sci-fi movie, creates an airy atmosphere ripe for satirizing our love of computer technology.
  26. Bored has its distinctive brand of slapstick noir down pat. Its charm is in the details. [9 Oct 2010, p.69]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  27. It's getting difficult to keep coming up with superlatives for this sophomore-season drama, especially with a thrilling and tantalizing episode like tonight's.
  28. This season, the show's only gotten better — deeper, richer, more true to its guiding intention of presenting people with Texas twangs as something other than the media cliche of rubes with bad taste.
  29. There's a lot to love about Murder One, bless its parodically sleazy, shrewdly opportunistic, talent-engorged heart.
  30. Instantly addictive.

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