Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,716 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Good Wife: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1301
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1301
1,301 tv reviews
  1. Mirren's Elzabeth is emotional... But with that comes soemthing as rare on TV as it is rewarding--a love affair involving people over the age of 50. [21 Apr 2006, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  2. The series occasionally displays the sweat stains of overexertion in the first few episodes... But once the intricate, greasy machinery of the policial/personal gets cranking in Brotherhood, there's no stopping the Caffee clan. [21 Jul 2006, p.59]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  3. If Brotherhood isn't as brilliant as The Wire, it's just as believable. The cast is so solid.
  4. This sly Britcom is like a C-SPAN spin-off of... The Office. [12 May 2006, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  5. Any fears you had that marriage and a baby would dull the sharp edge of Dexter--I admit it, I was worried--have been thoroughly allayed by season 4's wonderfully swift, witty, and violent start.
  6. The access is such that you almost wish every member of Congress had a TV crew. [25 Aug 2006, p.81]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  7. Less action-packed than BSG, but still awash in the familiar themes of life, loss, identity, and big frakkin' robots with guns.
  8. The ceaseless ways in which Milch and Nunn challenge our expectations about how families, friends, and strangers are meant to convey their fealty to each other, along with some fine hard-boiled dialogue and fisticuffs, suggest great continuing pleasures.
  9. The contestants are highly entertaining. [2 Feb 2007, p.116]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  10. If it weren't for the commercials and basic-cable cutaways from some violence, you'd swear you were watching a classic Western. [23 Jun 2006, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  11. The sheer number of plotlines can be overwhelming, but the images--flowers dropped on the side of the road, a dusty van sliding away--are relentlessly riveting. And the series only gets better from here. [5 Oct 2007, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where her movie overstayed its welcome, the quick-shot format of TV works beautifully. The result is haphazard, amoral, ridiculous, wildly offensive...and, you know, totally hilarious.
  12. Think Big Love-meets-Carnivale and you're in the ballpark, but The Riches boasts its own weird, violent, druggy, hilarious mix. [16 Mar 2007, p.63]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    MG is wonderfully absurd and the supporting cast is satisfyingly straight-faced. [21 Mar 2008, p.53]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  13. There are no big sociopolitical statements here, no guerilla-style confrontations, no scenes of squirmy awkwardness, no multilayered pop culture references. It's just a very smart, very funny show.
  14. Wise steals this, show, and his costars aren't easy prey. What's more, the dynamic is quite clever. [28 Sep 2007, p.94]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  15. This political satire operates at a level of sharpness that American television hasn't seen since Robert Altman's HBO miniseries Tanner '88.
  16. The premiere jumps the series from 1960 to 1962, but it plays coy with most of last season's cliff-hangers, including the whereabouts of Peggy's son with married exec Pete Campbell (played with oily brilliance by Vincent Kartheiser). It's quite a tease, but the debut proves Mad Men is as smart as ever
  17. Our greatest pleasure lies in anticipation of what is to come this season.
  18. True Blood is, if anything, faster, sleeker, more vicious, more fun that it already was. Yum-yum.
  19. Breaking Bad has, in short, everything you could want from an hour-long show: suspense, laughs, danger, and poignance.
  20. The sequel ditches the '70s for the '80s--but the original's hard-boiled plots, retro-pop score, and scene-stealing politically incorrect Gene Hunt (Philip Glenister) remain.
  21. The series shows the darker side of Belle's work without getting into that porno-punishing crap so often disguised as morality lessons. The series, like Belle, is far too smart to succumb to such an average attitude.
  22. A holiday special done right. [30 Nov 2007, p.126]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  23. At one point, before a press conference, Dern morphs her face from that of a human being into Harris' crazy-cuckoo public mask, and the moment is absolutely chilling. Fair? Debatable, but like Recount, it's a gorgeous bit of political theater.
  24. Who says TV doesn't make history thought-provokingly exciting?
  25. Kill pays both you and its subjects two solid compliments: It doesn't scream ''Take heed: This is a work of art!'' And it lets you form your own opinions about what its social commentary is.
  26. What lifts Eastbound & Down away from mere crudball humor is McBride's ongoing love affair with the lower middle class.
  27. This portrait of a profane, low-down egomaniac--excuse me, he prefers "Christ figure"--continues to amaze. McBride's willingness to play depression, amorality, and selfishness for laughs is awesome.
  28. Without the annoying melodrama [like "Desperate Housewives"], you become more emotionally hooked by the lives of the four complex and original characters.

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