Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 2,286 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 13% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 The Sopranos: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1755
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1755
1755 tv reviews
  1. The second season of Murphy Brown was even better than the first, expanding the parameters of its characters' behavior and providing lots of belly laughs.
  2. If you think Garry Shandling must be running out of ways to deconstruct show business, you're wrong. This will probably prove the most fearless half hour of comedy all year.
  3. There's a lot to love about Murder One, bless its parodically sleazy, shrewdly opportunistic, talent-engorged heart.
  4. Larry Sanders has always contained an undercurrent of tragedy in its portrait of a pathetically insecure man whose work is his life, and whose life is one long, uncomfortable commercial break. Fearlessly, Shandling and his cowriters are pushing Larry to the edge.
  5. The arc of this character--series creator Vince Gilligan's invention of Walter White as a sick soul--is, it's clear now. one of the great narratives in Television histpory. [13 Jul 2012, p.62]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As ever, it's all in the details.
  6. It's TV's richest, most satisfying experience.
  7. The best series on TV, period. [15 Sep 2006, p.63]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  8. Miraculous ... One of the myriad greatnesses of The Sopranos is that, to paraphrase the Godfather paraphrase that Steven Van Zandt's Silvio frequently quotes, it keeps pulling you back in — back in on yourself, appealing to your basest instincts, to your fundamental urge to hear a bloody story well told.
  9. The new Sopranos is as good as it's ever been -- ruthlessly emotional, cuttingly funny and frightening.
  10. It's the suspense these two leads endure--a suspense Homeland dramatizes in a swift, sure manner and then transfers to the viewer--that makes this show so unnervingly terrific.
  11. How pleasurable it is to really care about a TV series, to the point of (national) obsession.
  12. Fresh reporting and candid interviews make the trial newly compelling and illuminate its outcome. But it's the lesser-known players, including jurors and marketing agents, who provide provocative insights into the tragic saga of compounding historical injustices that implicate all of American culture. [3/10 June 2016, p.100]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  13. Giancarlo Esposito's Gus will prove once again that he is the most shockingly unknowable of villains. Yes, Breaking Bad is back, and bent on upending every expectation you bring to it.
  14. The more leisurely pace allows for some singular moments. [17 Mar 2006, p.101]
  15. The season gains more complexity and considerable power as it gains even more characters whose expressions of identity flick at other tenured and enduring American problems.
  16. A season that adds great depths to the bawdiest, wisest relationship comedy that isn't You're the Worst. [28 Apr/5 May 2017, p.101]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  17. Laura Dern and Mike White continue their bold, hilarious, tremendously moving exploration of Amy Jellicoe's ongoing attempt to give meaning to her life. [18 Jan 2013, p.74]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  18. Killing and sanctioned philandering aside, The Americans’ depiction of marriage is as profound as ever. Other developments augur more potential shift.
  19. It has the best tough-guy dialogue around and an acting ensemble that's ferociously effective. Face it: Homicide is a killer.
  20. A sprawl of engrossing setup. [4 Apr 2014, p.61]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  21. Any show that can accommodate decadent cruelty, tragic bravery, and political divisiveness is one you ought to be watching, frakkin' spaceships or not.
  22. It’s a smart twist that Maura, the Pfefferman who’s changed the most on the outside, is the only one who’s certain about who she is on the inside. The kids are still figuring that out.... But not everything here feels as natural as the relationships.
  23. C.K. is writing, directing, and starring up a storm here, and his usual opening-segment stand-up routine, involving nearsightedness, is funnier than most sitcoms are in an entire season.
  24. Well, after watching the first three episodes of the new season, I’m here to tell you that it’s still true [it's one of the finest experiences on television].
  25. The pleasure to be taken from 'Office' isn't merely that of laughter -- it's the pleasure of watching a piece of entertainment so perfectly made and so delicately acted.
  26. Deadwood has become one hell of a great gimmick-free Western.
  27. Its main purpose is to confront the taboo, and whether that means exploring just how far Louie will go into the "experimental" side of masturbation in the season premiere or simply digging into his ugliest prejudices about overweight women, the show can be revelatory.
  28. Dark, textured, and lively--this is how Dickens is done. [20 Jan 2006, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  29. After you watch a Larry Sanders show, the rest of television seems like it's on Prozac — smooth and edgeless, where Sanders is prickly and nervous.
  30. I can assert that the series has benefited artistically from the business decision that concluded last season. In shuttering Sterling Cooper and launching SCDP, the show is immediately jazzed by the renewed energy and willfulness that often accompanies a start-up.
  31. It's becoming obvious that The Simpsons, now in its second season, isn't just a product of media hype: Matt Groening's cartoon family is one of the few current works of popular art that possess wit and integrity.
  32. This might be a philosophical season of The Americans, but like any good countercultural force, it still gets its thrills from sex and violence.
  33. Season 4's first three hours make major investments in everyone, especially Gordon, imbuing them all with deeper poignancy. ... Halt and catch Fire is an urgent story of rehumanization for a cold, wired culture. Plug in now. [18/25 Aug 2017, p.88]
  34. It's an engrossing meditation on the complexities of redemption.
  35. It's the fall season's most intriguing, tense puzzler.
  36. The [actors] performances--and the show’s resonant, shrewdly paced writing-- anchor the drama in something beyond speculative bogey-man sci-fi, making the story feel less like a quasi-fictional fable than an entirely possible preview of what’s to come.
  37. Neither fully a comedy nor a drama, Transparent is simply transcendent. [19/26 Sep 2014, p.123]
  38. By the end, it's unclear which of these people are alive or dead, literally or spiritually. But The Returned still qualifies as a new zombie classic--a haunting tribute to the lost loves who feed on your brain forever.
  39. The most extraordinary show of the new TV season. ... It is a blessed relief that Life portrays things that have become 'issues' -- teenage drinking, unwanted sexual advances -- without turning them into moments of preachment. ... And I haven't even made it clear that this is also a really funny show. Just watch this thing, will you?
  40. Even in a “laugh-centric” season that should appeal to a slightly bigger audience, it’s not the jokes that stick with you.
  41. So the story moves slowly, focusing less on the game-changing moments that often come early in the season (Joffrey dies! The Unsullied revolt!) and more on long-term strategy. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, especially when it finally brings people (and story lines) together in this ever-sprawling world.
  42. The Larry Sanders Show is all tension, cynicism, profound shallowness, and naughty-boy bonding — it's just the way you imagine life behind a big-time TV talk show to be, except infinitely funnier.
  43. It’s a powerful expression of his [Aziz Ansari's] perspective and range--and one of 2015’s best shows.
  44. A bittersweet valentine, a timely fable about cultural character, Master of None is rich entertainment powered by Ansari’s increasing mastery of his art, his artistic hunger, and the wisdom and skill of his collaborators.
  45. Most TV series feel the need to up the ante in their second season, to prove the first one wasn't a fluke. Justified proceeds with such assurance, however, that it can maintain a cool, witty serenity that only enhances its tough-guy drama.
  46. Broadchurch is a gripping portrait of small-town paranoia.
  47. The stunningly shot result will make you wonder at the cruel beauty of nature. [16 Mar 2012, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  48. The new season pops with all the visual energy of the first. [4 May 2012, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  49. A stunningly shot wildlife series. [1 Jul 2016]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  50. The beauty part of The Larry Sanders Show is its subtlety—a kind of sophistication and knowing wickedness that compliments its knowing audience.
  51. The most compelling characters in season 3 are the gentleladies.
  52. It's a testament to Curb's cleverness that what's now rote--Larry offends, we cringe--can still be so surprising.
  53. The fourth season of Justified gives us exactly what we want: much laconic tough-guy humor from Timothy Olyphant's U.S. marshal Raylan Givens, much grandiloquent nastiness from Walton Goggins' drug dealer Boyd Crowder, and much swift violence.
  54. These powerfully acted investigations drive a narrative that meticulously tracks the procedures, language, and culture of the actors’ work. In doing so, The Night Of produces endless richness and sobering meanings about the degrading cost of a flawed justice system.
  55. It is possible to argue that, although Louis C.K. has created a work of genius with the FX show Louie, what he's really good at is stand-up. Oh My God offers further evidence for the thesis.
  56. “We need a chance to fail,” says Earn, bemoaning a one-chance (or no-chance), perfection-or-bust culture. Atlanta--a triumph of risk taking by its network and creator--moves you with this truth and others.
  57. Six hours of raucous laughter, bone-rattling suspense, and god-awful tragedy. ... The Corner is a marvel of craft.
  58. It remains one of TV's best meta-skewers of Hollywood. [10/17 Jul 2015, p.101]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  59. An enthralling recollection of a tragic mess with a long legacy, The People v. O.J. Simpson fits our moment like a glove.
  60. This sly Britcom is like a C-SPAN spin-off of... The Office. [12 May 2006, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  61. The high-IQ ensemble cracks the code with rapid-fire jokes on geek culture and frantic tension, striking a balance that continues to make the show a gutsy look at how success requires failing again... and again... and again. [22/29 Apr 2016, p.104]
  62. [Issa Rae's] show is even more assured in the second season. ... As an actress, Rae is a marvel. [21/28 Jul 2017, p.106]
  63. It's another level of pop culture wizardry to make such storytelling seem so vivid, so vital, and just plain fun.
  64. The dialogue is, as always, ribald and inspired. [10 Apr 2015, p.59]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  65. Every story in this constantly evolving season is a gripping winner. [10 Mar 2017, p.58]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  66. It's rich with beautifully crafted scenes that capture the distance, anger, and confusion of a fragmenting family and souls in flux. [10/17 Jul 2015, p.101]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  67. Orange Is the New Black might be the closest thing we have to Charles Dickens right now: a sharp denunciation of an arcane system, driven by hardscrabble characters with whimsical names that define who they are and what they like.
  68. The new Justified is so tightly plotted that it finds room for all these characters, as well as episodes shinning a spotlight on the series sterling supporting players. [27 Jan 2012, p.63]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  69. There’s a precision in the show’s expansion, a sense that the creative team wants to explore every corner of their comedy world--and every corner of the character’s psyches. Season 3 builds to one of the funniest, weirdest, and most profound moments I’ve ever seen in a television show--and that’s before the season finale.
  70. Breaking Bad has, in short, everything you could want from an hour-long show: suspense, laughs, danger, and poignance.
  71. The storytelling structure isn't just artiness for artiness' sake. Instead, it ingeniously reflects the fractured nature of investigations.
  72. Masters may be set in the 1950s, but its politics don't need to live there as well. Luckily, the conversations between the women are just as juicy as last season.
  73. Hawley, who wrote and directed the premiere, crafts a cool, taut, precisely styled hour of darkly comic neo-noir that stands in contrast to the delirious, subjective sensationalism of his other show, Legion. ... The cast is superb.
  74. We're taught that good drama relies on characters changing over time. Here, McDormand proves that a character's refusal to change can be just as compelling, and she hints at that stubbornness in exquisitely subtle fashion.
  75. It's not a nice show, but it's so damn good. ...Leary has invented simply one of the best characters on TV.
  76. The storytelling immediately recharges the Raylan vs. Boyd conflict.
  77. [The first episodes are] four of 24's best hours to date. [20 Jan 2006, p.59]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  78. This portrait of a profane, low-down egomaniac--excuse me, he prefers "Christ figure"--continues to amaze. McBride's willingness to play depression, amorality, and selfishness for laughs is awesome.
  79. I don't know about you, but I'm not used to laughing out loud alone in front of the TV. Honestly, I was startled.
  80. Tig
    Candid and funny. [10/17 Jul 2015, p.103]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  81. MasterChef Junior exults in the joy of cooking, the joy of childhood, and the joy of treating people decently.
  82. I defy the naysayers who claim Curb is in a rut: Who cares if it's not reinventing itself? It has become one of the most reliably amusing comedies on TV, taking little annoyances, indignities, and offenses, and worrying at them until they bubble into fantastically overblown debacles.
  83. It's getting difficult to keep coming up with superlatives for this sophomore-season drama, especially with a thrilling and tantalizing episode like tonight's.
  84. The best friends double down with absurd antics that would make even their season 1 selves blush. [16 Jan 2015, p.70]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  85. Mad Men offers a two-hour season premiere that commences with a muted tone and then explodes in different directions. [23 Mar 2012, p.62]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  86. The fifth and final season of David Simon's peerlessly acted, stunningly scripted, revolutionary drama of 1,000 moving parts kicks off Jan. 6.
  87. Hannibal captures your imagination with the prospect of Graham using his imagination to figure a way out. [28 Feb 2014, p.65]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  88. Season 2 is just as brainy and twisty and kinky [as season 1], and it ratchets up the suspense by making the threats to our "heroes" even more personal.
  89. What Buscemi brings to this production is his great gift for channeling neurotic self-consciousness into a man of action. He may fret about retaining his empire, but you believe Nucky Thompson is a lord of venality, right down to his immaculate spats.
  90. Burns' illuminating series turns the Roosevelt clan into a colorful Wes Anderson movie, albeit one in black and white. [12 Sep 2014, p.56]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  91. Watching these two friends bond anew--and meeting a more empathetic. vulnerable Holmes--makes for warm and witty fun. [17 Jan 2014, p.61]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  92. Brooklyn Bridge is beguiling, simultaneously the warmest and most intelligent new show of the season. It's also a vindication of artistic control in the TV industry.
  93. Smart, unruly, and very fast, Arrested is the ultimate TV series for our TiVo age.
  94. Although its style is novel, 24 hews to traditional crime-story conventions; you could plop this plot into a two-hour TV movie and be done with it. The advantage of the real-time hour becomes apparent, however, in the depth of characterization achieved by stretching things out.
  95. The show is at its manic best when a room is packed with loud, opinionated voices, all trying to be heard and protect their jobs; in season 5, the story pivots to bring the core group back together.
  96. This may be the first TV show since Pee-wee's Playhouse to treasure youth even as it embodies all of its contradictions, craziness, hopes, and fears (and I'd like to point out that Freaks is the only hour-long sitcom I've ever seen that sustains funniness for its full 60 minutes).
  97. You will feel guilty for laughing so hard, which is, I suspect, precisely the reaction David wants.
  98. Congrats to Bob's Burgers star H. Jon Benjamin, who is now voicing the lead on two of TV's funniest shows. [28 Jan 2011, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  99. Watching their [Alex and Laura's] relationship deepen is a highlight. [3 Jun 2016, p.102]
    • Entertainment Weekly

Top Trailers