Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 2,106 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 14% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Mad Men: Season 7
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1612
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1612
1612 tv reviews
  1. Congrats to Bob's Burgers star H. Jon Benjamin, who is now voicing the lead on two of TV's funniest shows. [28 Jan 2011, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  2. Watching their [Alex and Laura's] relationship deepen is a highlight. [3 Jun 2016, p.102]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  3. The artistic achievement of Treme is that it blends bluntness with the nuances of gorgeous music.
  4. The premiere jumps the series from 1960 to 1962, but it plays coy with most of last season's cliff-hangers, including the whereabouts of Peggy's son with married exec Pete Campbell (played with oily brilliance by Vincent Kartheiser). It's quite a tease, but the debut proves Mad Men is as smart as ever
  5. There are times when you wish the jokes in this series were a little funnier, but right now its unique situations — there's comedy gold being mined from Malcolm's gifted-child class of awkward brainiacs — make it distinctive.
  6. Like Betty's frumpy frocks, Mad Men's supersize episodes aren't flattering. Weiner should stick with tighter, denser storytelling packages. I hope he also delivers the season of change that the premiere seems to promise.
  7. The series is full of surprises ... And as Tony, Gandolfini gives a magnificently shrewd, wary performance. If, like me, you thought you never wanted to watch another Mob story, be sure to check this out.
  8. More and more, this series is looking like a minor classic, which I mean as a major complement. [20 Jan 2012, p.70]
  9. Our greatest pleasure lies in anticipation of what is to come this season.
  10. The mystery of just what happened to the child unspools almost languidly against the backdrop of wild and gorgeous New Zealand country. The ugliness of humans amid such beauty resounds like a cold slap.
  11. If Felicity doesn't quite live up to its hype as the season's niftiest new show, it's on its way to being a solid weekly soap opera.
  12. There are many ways in which Ed, the best new show of the season, could have been perfectly awful.
  13. Those unfamiliar with the film may find some scenes--like when the actors break character to tell their real-life stories--a bit jarring. [7 Apr 2006, p.54]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  14. By the end of the opening hour, you're already engaged by Coach Taylor's challenge to turn the East Dillon stragglers into guys who can complete the phrase ''Clear eyes, full hearts, can't lose'' without mumbling. And Friday Night Lights is headed for more touchdown episodes than you can count.
  15. Gritty-smart horror that nicely complements BBC America's sci-fi sensation Orphan Black. [9 May 2014, p.57]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  16. Somehow, just like its unfortunately tattooed protagonists, UnREAL just gets smarter the more shameless it gets.
  17. It possesses a different rhythm from any other show on TV. [13 Apr 2012, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  18. The cases (a baby at risk, a man with lung cancer, an unconscious drunk) are surprisingly moving, the editing only mildly manipulative, and you genuinely feel there's an element of reality to the show, a rare trait indeed for reality TV.
  19. Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson begin their third just how you'd expect. [19/26 Feb 2016, p.109]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  20. Through Jane's eyes, parenthood seems both delightful and utterly daunting, and her scenes will have you laughing and reaching for the Kleenex at the same time. [16 Oct 2016]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  21. Each season of this anthology drama tells a new story with a new cast, but McConaughey and Harrelson are so good, you immediately begin grieving the prospect of getting only eight episodes with them. [10 Jan 2013, p.67]
  22. Line for outrageous line, Veep is still a wickedly funny gut-buster. Yet while I could relate to Selina the perpetually marginalized chump, flailing to advance, Selina the stumping, power-grabbing candidate risks confusion.
  23. It’s a grim season, but there are still enough great one-liners to remind you why Orange has earned a best-comedy nod from the Emmys.
  24. The yuk-filled second ep of the sophomore season rectifies this neglect with a plot that tempts Jeff to return to his soul-corrupting old firm, much to the dismay of his community-college study buddies.
  25. The Pacific has both grand scale and intimacy. It builds in intensity as the series proceeds.
  26. I love how smart and snide Silicon Valley is about ambition, and I love how the show’s actors imbue their geeky cut-outs with winsomely flawed humanity that allows us to care about them even as they undercut each other and themselves in their pursuit of success and significance.
  27. Talking heads such as Daniel Okrent are eloquently pithy. And narrator Peter Coyote is as soothing as a tumbler of fine Scotch.
  28. Jennifer Saunders' Edina and Joanna Lumley's Patsy are as deliciously delusional as ever in the Britcom's 20th-anniversary special.
  29. Horton Foote's 1953 teleplay proves as durable as ever in this transfer of 2013's hit Broadway revival. Cicely Tyson is as fiercely magnetic on a small screen. [7 Mar 2014, p.62]
  30. This excellent six-part series brings the statesman's [Thomas Cromwell's] shady story to light with wit, empathy, and even surprise. [3 Apr 2015, p.59]
    • Entertainment Weekly

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