Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,709 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Good Wife: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1295
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1295
1,295 tv reviews
  1. Certainly, the show is still exciting and thoughtful in the way that it disassembles many pat notions we may have of tribe loyalty, family bonds, and the treachery of the business world.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Six seasons in, and Sunny continues to be a shining example of how to expertly combine smart political commentary with the basest of humor.
  2. Rock manages to layer in quieter scenes between Baldwin and Jack McBrayer's Kenneth the Page that remind you of an iron law of feather-light farce: No matter how crazy the characters seem to us, they have to relate to each other as though they're making perfect sense.
  3. The first two episodes contain strong subplots about staff downsizing and rolled-back pensions, indicators that Ted is doing a better job of folding real-life resonances into its silliness.
  4. Sex and violence certainly have their place here, but they're placed in the context of a vivid city that, as dangerous, seamy, and profane as it can be, is a place you want to revisit every week.
  5. They say analyzing comedy kills it, but in this case, it's one revelation after another. Add rare footage of their early years, some non-Python TV appearances, tense on-set footage filmed during the making of their movies, and clips of their greatest hits, and you've got Monty nirvana.
  6. As in Office Space, the heart of the show is watching Richard and his friends struggle to make sense of themselves and their purpose. They're good, weird guys you want to hang out with.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This series is officially on fire now.
  7. There are funny moments and heartbreaking ones on this fascinating docuseries. [13 Jul 2012, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  8. It all feels been-there, done-that. Slow-burn start? Maybe. Or maybe Justified's own pipeline has run dry.
  9. Forgoing its recent dip into somnambulism, Empire is (literally) all guns blazing again.
  10. The pie puns continue to make me wince--Olive says she’s ''really flaky,'' while Lily accuses her of being ''all pious.'' And Chi McBride's cynical detective still feels oddly disconnected from the rest of the ensemble. But the show has a fresh, vigorous snap, and the impeccably deadpan Pace gets off some good lines.
  11. We know that a guilty, defensive Jackie is the best Jackie to watch.
  12. As sweet as treacle tart, the third season of Downton Abbey arrives reasonably fresh and warm. [11 Jan 2013, p.74]
  13. Lisa Kudrow is hilarious as online shrink Fiona Wallice, but her true talent is making those around her even funnier.
  14. Really, my only significant complaint about the new '24' is an excessive use of its visual trademark: split-screen images. These are fine when they're used to let you know where major characters are in different subplots simultaneously, but in next week's episode, there's a split-screen shot that separates two characters talking in the same room together!
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    If you think catching up on Smash's injury, Lyla and Riggins' new relationship, and Lyla's now-AWOL mom is overwhelming, just think how Tami (Connie Britton) must feel.
  15. Luther avoids some genre cliches--we know the killer's identity from the get-go, which sidesteps the time-stamp predictability of a Law & Order episode--but plunges headfirst into others.
  16. You won't want to watch this, Yes, it will wreck you. But you'll be grateful you let it. [8 Nov 2013, p.61]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  17. Cosmos captures the imagination anew by celebrating imagination itself as an essential tool for a deeper, more truthful understanding of life. [7 Mar 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Maury Povich? Eat your heart out.
  18. The most visceral moments emerge from Buscemi's conversations with his former colleagues and lifelong friends at Engine Co. 55, rendering vivid and tearful accounts of tragedies.
  19. A glossy story of love gone wrong and then (slightly) redeemed at the end, without a whole lot of deep pathos in between.
  20. This powerful documentary about the lingering effects of military conflict makes the point that PTSD existed long before we named it.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  21. Ken Burns' documentary about the "black blizzards" that swept across the Great Plains during the 1930s is at once rigorously sourced and heartbreakingly emotional.
  22. FNL's final season begins with one person staying put (Taylor Kitsch's Riggins is still in jail) and others moving on (Aimee Teegarden's Julie and Jesse Plemons' Landry are college-bound). Meanwhile, Coach Taylor (Kyle Chandler) heads to the basketball court to find his next star player. [Oct 22/29 2010, p.107]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  23. We can confirm that it boasts a string of crackerjack performances from the likes of Stephen Rea as a hangdog spy, Janet McTeer as his spook boss, Lubna Azabal as the housekeeper of Nessa's brother (Andrew Buchan), and Gyllenhaal herself. [25 Jul/1 Aug 2014, p.105]
  24. Dead is beautifully shot, but what it's shooting are former humans with rotting skin and bleating agonized groans. And like the comics, there's great, grim humor.
  25. Rectify's many stories are strung together with a wonderful, airy pacing--all hail the slow-TV movement!--that lends a haunting backdrop to the story of a man who may not be able to find a life, even after avoiding death.
  26. The plots are twistier than a fishtail braid and only lag when the conversation turns to energy. [25 Jan/1 Feb 2013, p.112]
    • Entertainment Weekly

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