Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 2,337 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 13% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 The Wire: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Justice for Natalee Holloway
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1793
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1793
1793 tv reviews
  1. The premiere episode of Dharma & Greg delivers rather more than you might expect; it has the zing of a '30s screwball comedy.
  2. A fascinating, thorough history lesson that overcomes its early hiccups to tell a stirring tale well worth a binge.
  3. An intimate show deeply curious about its characters that hits--apologies in advance for this--just the right high.
  4. The show is a scrubbed-clean soap. [28 Sep 2012, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  5. This excellent, Robert Redford-narrated look at both the Watergate scandal and the film it inspired backs up the comic's [Louis C.K.'s] assertion about politics never being more insane.
  6. There are new mysteries aplenty, albeit ones with a more beguiling, Ray Bradbury-esque tinge than before.... This premiere does enough to make us want to find out. [2 Oct 2015, p.69]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  7. Tim Gunn still motherhens the designers, the dramatic arcs feel familiar (one designer is a recovering addict, another gave up a career as a surgeon), and--wonders to behold--there's even a branch of the fabric store Mood in Runway's new Los Angeles home.
  8. It's a beautiful mess. Don't miss it. [29 Nov 2013, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  9. Olyphant is surrounded by a terrific supporting cast, including Dirty Sexy Money's Natalie Zea as Raylan's ex-wife and Nick Searcy (Deke Slayton in From the Earth to the Moon) as his deceptively cornpone boss. But in the end, it comes down to hard stares and that combination of drawled amusement and sudden violence that make him so cool yet exciting.
  10. The result is satisfyingly twist-filled and chilling in every sense.
  11. Kill pays both you and its subjects two solid compliments: It doesn't scream ''Take heed: This is a work of art!'' And it lets you form your own opinions about what its social commentary is.
  12. Groening has created a group of characters whose personalities and motives are more vivid and detailed than the vast majority of sitcoms featuring flesh-and-blood actors.
  13. 'Deadwood' creates from the git-go a villain for the ages in Al Swearengen. McShane's slicingly deep voice is like a bowie knife stuck in the series' heart, but instead of stopping its action, he brings the show to pumping, bloody life.
  14. Every crime--murder, bank robbery, changing lanes without signaling--is a mini-masterpiece of L.A. noir. But the real draw is the cast.
  15. Touching and intimate, the movie provides a fascinating portrait of a scion. [1/8 Apr 2016, p.101]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  16. Whether it’s turning its squinty eye on soccer practice or sexting or how to handle your best friend’s useless stoner husband, that real-lifeness, in all its weird, mundane, un-laugh-tracked glory, is the best thing about Better Things.
  17. Brooks remains quick-minded and vivid. [14 Dec 2012, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  18. CSI'S William Petersen is the new military honcho. He's crisp, commanding, a bit bland, but effective--just like the premiere. [16 Oct 2015]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  19. You know this Dr. Who spin-off aims to please when the return of Capt. Jack Harkness (John Barrowman) isn't even the big news.... With [Capt.] John [James Marsters] adding such a fun, unhinged element, it's a shame these two crazy kids broke up in the first place.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where the series could get preachy, it's tempered, and above all, the whole thing's just a lot of fun.
  20. The storytelling in The Good Fight lacks some of the scope and jaunty walk-and-talk drive of The Good Wife, a consequence, perhaps, of a smaller budget. But everything else--writing, acting, vision--is smart and strong, and each episode moves briskly and offers ample entertainment.
  21. The sheer number of plotlines can be overwhelming, but the images--flowers dropped on the side of the road, a dusty van sliding away--are relentlessly riveting. And the series only gets better from here. [5 Oct 2007, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  22. Community's premiere is a focused, confident piece of storytelling about a humbled enterprise and screwed-up people scared straight by the reality of their squandered potential. Subsequent episodes are lighter if spottier than the bittersweet premiere.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Sure, watching a trapeze act slowly take form is fun (really fun, actually), but what's fascinating here is the deeply empathetic storytelling. It turns out what happens outside the ring is the most interesting part of Circus. [5 Nov 2010, p.65]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  23. An above-average sitcom.
  24. Though the premiere's ending has been mostly spoiled by the marketing for the new season, every moment watching the hopefuls fight for their dream and navigate the foreign waters of the movie industry--like when the winner demands to shoot the small-budget project on 35mm film--is completely absorbing. [11 Sep 2015, p.56]
  25. All that commotion sets the season on a compelling path, hitting the road with a purpose. This is when Dead is at its best: journeying through postapocalyptic, fun-house-mirror America.
  26. So far, Martin and Daphne have been good for a few solid laughs per show,but the indispensable costar has proven to be Frasier's brother, Niles, played by David Hyde Pierce.
  27. Stick with it. Free your eyes to take in the spectacle, and your brain will magically start following the intricate storytelling. And there's a magical realism to Game of Thrones.

Top Trailers