Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,141 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Dom Hemingway
Lowest review score: 0 Let's Be Cops
Score distribution:
5,141 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It all comes down to one scene: John Cusack, standing at dusk, boom box aloft, blaring Peter Gabriel's ''In Your Eyes'' outside Ione Skye's window. This, friends, is what rapturous, heartrending, soul-spinning love is all about.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You may not like the terms Tarantino sets, but you have to admit he succeeds on them.
  1. The movie draws us into the illusion that we're simply eavesdropping on the lives of three inner-city black and Hispanic girls.
  2. It's a lovely, original, Australian take on a climactic moment usually thought of as all American.
  3. Topsy-Turvy reminds us that, in any age, creative expression is at once the most personal and most communal of enterprises.
  4. All in all, Blood Simple looks better than ever.
  5. Disciplined script -- bitingly funny.
  6. While never slow, the film feels quiet and spacious, like a prayer.
  7. Rosetta is a character of raw pride in a film of lingering power.
  8. For sheer dramatic wallop outpowers virtually every fiction feature I've seen this year.
  9. Arenas' life zigzags before us in a manner as heady and unpredictable as it must have felt to the man who lived it.
  10. Someone has finally done it -- made a sexually explicit feature that is also a genuine and harrowing work of erotic drama.
  11. These 173 minutes don't drag, they waltz.
  12. Voluptuously engrossing.
  13. With the pitiless, devastating Fat Girl, Catherine Breillat puts men and women, boys and girls on notice: When fantasy, hypocrisy, and manipulation mix in a wet, sandy place, you dive into sex at your own risk.
  14. This stunning movie -- one of the very best of the year -- makes a much read American classic feel new and freshly devastating.
  15. A great, searching, incendiary chronicle of the Sex Pistols, the razor-hearted visionaries of punk anarchy.
  16. Remains the only rock & roll film that exerts the saturnine intensity of a thriller.
  17. A small cubist masterpiece about crime and punishment set in that most split-level of environments, Los Angeles.
  18. The lightness with which Buñuel was able to insert the little jokes and knife stabs of surrealism he loved so much is, in fact, divine.
  19. Without ever dipping into indignity among wet, half-naked men, Shower sparkles with joy.
  20. A delicate yet haunting movie, a meditation on friendship, on the roots of bohemianism, on the sad comedy of madness.
  21. Fred Leuchter is just one deluded figure, but by the end of this great and chilling sick-joke documentary he stands as a living icon of the banality of evil.
  22. Rohmer treasures the undervalued glories of discourse and the intimacy of conversation over the obviousness of action or sexual display.
  23. Ulee's Gold is a story of redemption, and Nunez doesn't make redemption look any easier than it is.
  24. Lean, elegant, and emotionally complex -- a marvel of backwoods classicism.
  25. Circles the heart of noisy, modern Tehran with an informal, documentary-like freedom that is thrilling in its naturalism.
  26. Go
    The one truly thrilling movie I've seen so far this year.
  27. Achieves its exquisite tension--deepening beautifully from a "Death in Venice" setup to an imaginative meditation, on art and life, of uncommon sensitivity.
  28. Affliction -- a beautiful bummer, a magnificent feel-bad movie -- is American filmmaking of a most rewarding order.
  29. Sensational and accomplished.
  30. The beauty of Swingers lies in the irony of its title: Despite their lounge-lizard posing, these guys will never really live up to their Rat Pack dreams.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  31. A comedy of the ridiculous in which the ridiculous turns unexpectedly sublime.
  32. True art is a journey to somewhere you've never been, and there has never been a movie quite like Breaking the Waves.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Funny and scary, Reversal is a tour de force for Schroeder, who examines the idle rich, the intricacies of the legal system, and the imperatives of morality concisely but with unmatched brio.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  33. Stunning, fully formed masterpiece.
  34. The real feast is in the mix of characters, each so finely and unschmaltzily delineated in a script so confident and controlled that even the most passing of participants comes alive.
  35. Beautiful, compassionate, articulate domestic drama.
  36. Jim Carrey's performance is an impersonation on the level of genius.
  37. Leaves you shaken and ecstatic at the same time, transported by the vision of a major film artist.
  38. Fierce, loving, and electric, this movie's got bite as well as bark.
  39. There's piercing sadness, and fury, too, in this Everyman's isolation, and Cantet is singularly skilled at evoking the universal condition of such tragic ordinariness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A hypnotically engrossing thriller that spins along on the dreams and anxieties of its characters.
  40. The rare movie that turns cruelty into art.
  41. Don't let unpleasant personal dental associations stand in the way of seeing a luminous specimen of independent filmmaking.
  42. American Splendor presents Pekar as drawn on the page, Pekar as brilliantly interpreted by Paul Giamatti, and the actual Pekar, in the double role of narrator and interview subject -- sometimes all at once. The magic act is thrilling, and truly surprising.
  43. It's thrillingly original, lyrical, and wise, and the filmmaker conveys the mutable intensity of young love with the authoritative originality of an important filmmaker.
  44. No dramatic feature has ever come quite this close to the matter-of-fact ugliness of the Nazi crimes.
  45. By the end, Campion views all her characters with a compassion bordering on grace, a humanity-like her heroine's-as dark, quiet, and enveloping as the ocean.
  46. A candy store for film buffs.
  47. With an authenticity that is tender and merciless, the movie shows you what it looks like when youth rebellion becomes a form of fascism.
  48. Alexander Payne's scathing, subtle, and complexly funny tragicomedy builds a perfect, off-kilter universe--it's a first cousin to "Rushmore."
  49. A madcap gem.
  50. They're like gods at play, paragons of pure delight, as they mock and feign their way through a universe of mere mortals. To see the movie again is to realize that they were never entirely of this earth and that they never will be.
  51. Working from a superb script by Paul Attanasio, Redford has caught the way a show like Twenty-One offered a carny-barker version of the American Dream.
  52. The film catches us by surprise in its moving portrayal of the love between Larry and Althea, played by Courtney Love in a performance that glides from kinky abandon to stark tragedy.
  53. It's Swank, however, who's the revelation. By the end, her Brandon/Teena is beyond male or female. It's as if we were simply glimpsing the character's soul, in all its yearning and conflicted beauty.
  54. An amazing thing -- a work of cinematic art in which form and structure pursues the logic-defying (parallel) subjects of dreaming and moviegoing.
  55. Bleak, brilliant, and unsparing.
  56. This is the rare movie that gets you to fall in love with characters you don't even like.
  57. A gaily funny, shrewdly inventive satire.
  58. In E.T., Spielberg proved a herald of the age when moviegoers would make full-time friends with fantasy, but his most special effect was taking us into ourselves.
  59. Gets weirder and meaner and darker and sadder as it progresses, which is amazing since it simultaneously remains funny and horrifying right up to the end.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Simple, funny, gorgeous, sad, and sweet, perfect for playing over and over.
  60. It's a great, IQ-flattering entertainment both wonderful and wise.
  61. It becomes as savage as ''Reservoir Dogs,'' ''The Killing,'' or any of the other dozens of films over which it still casts a shadow.
  62. Mark Wahlberg, in a star-making performance, has the kind of electric ingenuousness that John Travolta did in "Saturday Night Fever."
  63. The richest and most satisfying romantic movie of the year. It's really about two great loves at once -- the love of life and of art -- and the way that Shakespeare, like no writer before him, transformed the one into the other.
  64. Dizzily rich, witty, and satisfying.
  65. (Denis's) visual style is hypnotic, rapturous, and she makes barren landscapes look gorgeous, hard men look vulnerable.
  66. A bold, searching, wrenching experience. It may be the most complexly impassioned message movie Hollywood has ever made.
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A masterpiece.
  67. Sad, funny, sexy, and altogether marvelous.
  68. The uncoagulated anguish of parents mourning the death of a child has rarely been more powerfully depicted than in the collected vignettes of grief, rage, and retribution that make up the riveting domestic drama In the Bedroom.
  69. The power of this great movie -- part comedy, part tragedy, part satire, mostly masterpiece -- is in the details.
  70. Almodóvar's masterwork, is a spectacular synthesis of everything that has always interested him -- proud women, lovely boys, beautiful drag queens, grand movie stars, gorgeous frocks, wild wallpaper .
  71. In this brilliantly sustained climax, Coppola unveils a vision of corruption that embraces the entire world, but he's also reveling in sheer theatrical magic in a way that only a master can.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A movie with exquisite period detail. [8 Apr 1994]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  72. The superb screenplay won an award at Cannes this year for good reason.
  73. Stunning, unsettling, beautifully written drama.
  74. An existential chain reaction, yet as remarkable as his cinematic gamesmanship is the way that he traces the anatomy of feeling in Lola.
  75. Carries so much impacted menace and visual narrative gamesmanship that it brought back some of the excitement I felt nearly a decade ago watching Quentin Tarantino's ''Reservoir Dogs.''
  76. Titanic floods you with elemental passion in a way that invites comparison with the original movie spectacles of D.W. Griffith.
  77. By the time The Crying Game is over, you'll never look at beauty in quite the same way.
  78. It's a scrumptious and dizzy-spirited lark, a what-the-hell-let's-rob-the-casino flick made with so much wit and brains and dazzle and virtuosity that the sheer speed and cleverness of the caper hits you like a shot of pure oxygen.
  79. Like David Lynch, Quentin Tarantino, and Paul Thomas Anderson, Solondz revels in ironic pop passion. It's a signature moment when he transforms Air Supply's "All Out of Love" into a geek-love rhapsody.
  80. Pfeiffer reveals an emotional nakedness that's almost shocking. Never has she exposed so much and done it so simply. Who knew she could be this good?
  81. The movie is pulp, yet it attains a surprising emotional power-especially when Anjelica Huston's Lilly, a survivor who'll do whatever it takes to master her surroundings, is on-screen.
  82. The antidote to every square tough-guy caper you've ever seen, and the inspiration for many great ones. It is an existential imperative to seek out a showing and burn rubber to get there, preferably in an excellent car.
  83. It would be hard to imagine a movie about drugs, depravity, and all-around bad behavior more electrifying than Trainspotting.
  84. It's a mad cycle of arrogance and despair, and Bloody Sunday etches it onto your nervous system.
  85. A beautifully sinister and transfixing entertainment-age daydream.
  86. An extraordinary film; it may be the most haunting documentary since ''Crumb.''
  87. A voyeur's delight.
  88. The film is sublime entertainment, at once ticklish and suspenseful, cynical and sincere. By its very existence, Altman's comedy about the death of Hollywood lets you know that movies are still alive and kicking.
  89. The rare Hollywood epic that dares to entertain an audience by engaging the world.
  90. Like everything else in this superb work of art, ''Shrinking Lover'' is exquisitely Almodóvarian. It's funny, tender, a little shocking, and it pays homage to what we know about movies: that they can move us beyond words.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    [Tarantino's] ability to take what seem like minor conversational themes and dovetail them onto later exchanges for maximum comic effect is close to genius. And the action can be literally heart-stopping.
  91. May be the first movie to fully capture the way that drugs dislocate us from ourselves.
  92. Vibrantly, intricately alive on its own terms. This is what magic the movies can conjure with an inspired fellowship in charge, and unlimited pots of gold.

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