Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,335 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck
Lowest review score: 0 Ace Ventura: Pet Detective
Score distribution:
5,335 movie reviews
  1. With its ungainly double-deception premise, How to Lose a Guy feels like it was made out of two connect-the-dots drawings laid haphazardly on top of one another.
  2. Something is wrong under this big tent. Actually made to resemble a good old-fashioned, crowd-pleasing movie, this cinematic Water for Elephants droops and lumbers like Rosie the elephant herself.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Wait until the best parts pop up on YouTube.
  3. Beresford, who'd like to teach the world to sing, makes the moment as moving as a Coca-Cola jingle. It's not the real thing, but it's effective.
  4. As it is, the story collapses like a bad tip to Liz Smith. Still, there's something brash, retro, and even stupidly touching about all the chatty mania, and the way Baitz and Pacino get off on paranoia, conspiracy theories, and the lure of 1960s idealism.
  5. Shanley turns out to have dismayingly few original cinematic notions to back up the basic did-he-or-didn't-he hook in his study of conviction and compassion.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    If writer-director Tony Vitale ladles on the cliches with extra sauce, Guido still has a hey-Ma-I'm-makin'-a-movie enthusiasm that's more infectious than it has a right to be.
  6. The surprise, and disappointment, of The Da Vinci Code is how slipshod and hokey the religious detective story now seems.
  7. The rules of good screenwriting are mostly broken, though Jamie Foxx's smash-and-grab charisma remains intact.
  8. There are fun moments, especially with Kristin Chenoweth’s vampy poison dart frog. But with more evolved films like "The LEGO Movie" and "Frozen" in the animated ecosphere, overstuffed and gag-reliant time-passers like the Rio movies feel like a dying breed.
  9. Has a voyeuristic tug, but all in all it's a lot less sensational than it wants to be.
  10. That Cruise fails to make a case for Reacher's allure, though, has less to do with physical dissonance than it does with the film's inability - stupefying inability, really - to otherwise make a case for the character's originality in a movie so choked with visual clichés and dreadfully moldy dialogue.
  11. The noisiest laughs in this watery animated comedy are reserved for those who value self-referential winks above all else.
  12. Florid, convoluted historical drama.
  13. The movie, I'm sad to report, has a majorly disappointing follow-through. It turns into a noisy, squalling chase movie.
  14. The film is stuffed with three endings too many. You can't blame Raimi for wanting to give us our money's worth. But after a while, you just want him to get to the Happily Ever After already.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Earnest and intermittently diverting, this cheerful little movie isn't the sort of thing you see every day.
  15. Connoisseurs of digital animation, graphic novels, and the history of dystopian art will have plenty to discuss about Christian Volckman's visually striking, technically impressive black-and-white animated feature Renaissance…But no one will be talking about the movie's banal plot, the trite dialogue, or any of the indistinguishable characters who offer a bleak futuristic vision of cinema that's all style, no soul.
  16. As a work of art, the movie, shot quickly on digital video, is genial enough if unrefined.
  17. Shia LaBeouf, who appears to be on hand to prove that a movie with a crusading newspaper reporter can still exist, perks up his scenes, and Redford acts with his usual hyperalert, placid control.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    This is one sexy and satisfyingly twisty dance.
  18. Tony Leung plays Ip Man with his old-movie charisma and reserve, but the film, despite a few splendid fights, is a biohistorical muddle that never finds its center. Maybe that's because — big mistake! — it never gets to Bruce Lee.
  19. Older and sadder, Mulder and Scully are no longer sure they've got the energy to even ask if the truth is still out there. And it feels as if Carter is skeptical, too.
  20. Wafer-thin, content-light, structure-wobbly, and whimsy-heavy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    The way that Aranoa so clearly venerates his lively women feels Almodóvar-esque, but the movie aims most of all to suggest that hookerdom is hell -- and it's neither realistic nor unsentimental enough to pull that off.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    At its best, Movie 43 resembles a risqué episode of Saturday Night Live - a comparison reinforced by the presence of both parody ads and Jason Sudeikis. At its worst? Let's just say that Hugh Jackman fans who want to remember the actor as Jean Valjean and not as a guy with a scrotum sprouting from his neck should make alternate plans this weekend.
  21. He's Just Not That Into You turns romantic sanity into something so sanitized that it starts to make delusion look good.
  22. This sloppy, pleasant comedy by playwright and TV producer Robin Schiff (Almost Perfect) is an amiable mess, a padded-out expansion of a play called "Ladies' Room."
  23. For the invited filmmaker, the opportunity to make a statement is surely a thrill, but for the viewer - who can't pause indefinitely, as with a book, between stories - the focus-shifting is a demand.
  24. While he's (Bridges) having more fun than anyone in the audience is likely to be having, it's such a rip-snorting go-for-broke performance that it almost makes R.I.P.D. worth the price of admission. Almost.
  25. Scottish actor Peter Mullan saves a drama tangled in the seaweed of life lessons from drowning in pathos.
  26. Mostly comes down to rage fiends going at one another with baseball bats, knives, pesticide tanks, and power drills.
  27. Sean Penn doesn’t make movies very often these days. So when he does, you go in with certain expectations. Sadly, it’s best to leave them at the concession stand if you’re planning on enjoying The Gunman.
  28. The warmth comes through, even if the storytelling is simplistic and clichéd.
  29. House 2 may never elicit more than mild chuckles, but when Momma teaches the Fullers a few lessons about family, it's heartfelt without being syrupy.
  30. The difference between "Pretty Woman" and Runaway Bride is that we can no longer buy Roberts in her tearful romantic-melancholy mode. It seems vaguely patronizing now.
  31. As a movie, Freakonomics is like Jujubes for the brain - it starts to get cloying halfway through the box.
  32. Undoubtedly a trifle, but it's still kind of nice for a summer movie to try charming us instead of just bludgeoning us into submission.
  33. Every so often, Keanu Reeves' robo-voiced blankness serves him well, but when he has to play a pulpy, tormented demon-saint, scraping up insults and spitting them out like bullets, he's like the host of an infomercial doing an impersonation of a badass.
  34. But in this standard athlete-dies-young presentation, we never do catch the magic that made Steve Prefontaine a towering figure. Instead, this Pre is a shaggy-haired, sentimental favorite -- a teen angel rather than an Olympian.
  35. Overworked if heartfelt indie.
  36. Some motion pictures portray ultimate passion; others create ultimate thrills. Men in Black II achieves ultimate insignificance -- it's the sci-fi comedy spectacle as Whiffle-Ball epic.
  37. Clint Eastwood's American Sniper is a film that evokes complicated emotions. A month after seeing it, you might still be wrestling with whether it's powerful, profound, or propaganda.
  38. All those twangy, homespun observations interrupt and annotate the narrative until Black and MacLaine's scenes start to feel as trivial as reenactments on a true-crime TV show.
  39. The hothouse drama Mother and Child is organized like a femme-friendly spa that specializes in treatments for the psyche rather than the skin. Soft New Agey music tinkles intrusively. Sore spots are prodded and massaged. Clients pass one another in the changing room. The ritual is exquisite to some, and excruciating to others.
  40. Hart's exasperated dervish shtick has moments of real live-wire anarchy, including one priceless gag at a firing range. Will it be enough to make Hart a household name? Maybe. But both he and his fans deserve better.
  41. Werewolves are tame with overuse, and movies like Blood and Chocolate -- where moments of inspiration vie in vain with Goth cliché -- play like underlit "Charmed" reruns.
  42. True to his stolid, humanist instincts and characteristically stodgy directorial style, writer-director John Sayles creates a story more educational than engrossing.
  43. The aliens aren't particularly scary or funny, and so the joke of watching Smith and Jones crack wise in their faces wears thin.
  44. One of those feminist cries in the dark in which the heroine, a saintly sufferer, is more admirable than interesting.
  45. Safe has more action than intrigue (or logic), and it's boilerplate vicious. It may satisfy Statham's fans, but they - like he - would do well to enlarge their expectations.
  46. Filmmaker Greg MacGillivray, a specialist in gigantic-screen nature movies including "The Living Sea," is up to date in his use of 70mm IMAX film, but he's stuck in the past about how to tell a story.
  47. A collection of shorts, here presented as flashbacks. All three derive from A.A. Milne's original tales, but retain only a smidgen of his droll, easy-chair wit.
  48. Their message (Cassavetes and screenwriter Jeremy Leven) in My Sister's Keeper? Cancer sucks, but there's always the balm of beach scenes and an emo soundtrack.
  49. A celebration of the theater that tends to drag the moment it's out of drag.
  50. Enough cheery mockery to amuse even non-tokers.
  51. So diaphanous it practically dissolves as you watch it.
  52. A bland, pious yet touching faith-based tearjerker.
  53. Oblivion has enough special-effects artistry to keep you distracted for a while. But all the eye candy in the world can’t mask the sensation that you’ve seen this all before…and done better.
  54. Plays more like a teaching tool than a dynamic drama.
  55. Cowboys & Aliens has fun moments, but it's a plodding entertainment because it mostly tastes like leftovers.
  56. In the ranks of improbable gymnastics coaches, Nick Nolte falls just below the cartoon version of Mr. T.
  57. Chan needs a foil, and Hewitt, while perky, doesn't project nearly enough comedy weight; she's too slight and tailored for his style.
  58. There's something already exhausted, however, in the intrusively gauzy, wobbly, blurry, zoomy digital-video look of the piece.
  59. Director Kathryn Bigelow is one of the new-style action wizards who’ve never quite mastered the nuts and bolts of telling a story.
  60. A few gags are brilliantly staged, but most have a smug, collegiate take-it-or-leave-it quality that makes full-on belly laughter feel optional.
  61. The movie takes off from a concept as basic as a videogame, and it sticks to that concept, without surprise.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    The movie -- which never decides if it's a fantasy or coming-of-age story -- spends a lot of time away from Terabithia; that also leaches out the wonder. The boy seems more excited that Zooey Deschanel is his hottie music teacher than he is to see tree men in the forest.
  62. Are there surprises? A couple of big money ones, notably the ludicrous would-be jaw-dropper of a finale.
  63. For all the creaminess of the sets and costumes, every character talks as if she is still made out of written words, not flesh, and each woman's struggles feel about as important as a tea dance.
  64. Ironically, they make the bond between John and Savannah look so natural that the ''dear John'' turn in their relationship makes even less sense than it does in the book.
  65. What's missing from this by-the-numbers drama is a sense of abandon.
  66. The movie is merciless sending up "Juno's" self-satisfied hipster gobbledygook, and it's quite funny to see Hannah Montana still promoting her tie-in products as she lies crushed and dying under a meteor.
  67. 2F2F, under the cut-to-the-chase direction of John Singleton, strips the package known as the Mindless Summer Movie down to its barest components of wheels, skin, and a pulsing soundtrack.
  68. This shot-on-film-and-video trifle reveals a Bombay (that's what all the characters call it) that "Slumdog Millionaire" didn't: a delicate metropolis sunk in torpor.
  69. Wrings laughs from the antics of affable, eccentric villagers who cheerily break the law.
  70. Depression is a fair subject for a movie, but this much moroseness shouldn't come to this little.
  71. The whole thing feels like a half-day of community service, which Lawrence walks through good-naturedly.
  72. Neither powerful nor interesting. It is a run-of-the-mill movie ''product'' developed as part of a 50 Cent marketing plan.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a little short on coherence and long on comic-book sensationalism -- dig the hokey, climactic Battle of the Minds between the hero and a cadaverous Mr. Big -- but there's no denying the nightmarish pull of the film's aesthetic.
  73. Hudson's sunny, ringlet-tossing appeal fits snugly into the film's happy-homemaker ideology: She makes caring for three kids she barely knows look downright glamorous.
  74. Unfortunately, no one involved seems to have bent over backwards to make the movie either original or even all that scary.
  75. At best, this version succeeds as a Sunday school supplement. But the blandness is enough to make you long for Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ."
  76. Frequently silly, yet eminently more watchable than such leaden Schwarzenegger efforts as ''Eraser.''
  77. A revolutionary life has rarely felt less edgy, or the biography of an iconoclast more bourgeois.
  78. There's always something to look at (an octopus holding his eyeballs aloft, the petulant Jane assaulted by pixie dust), but the story is weak tea.
  79. Agresti fattens us up with the kind of kid's-eye-view tragi-comic adventures that regularly supply empty calories in artificially sweetened foreign-language imports.
  80. What it isn't is a believable relationship. Yet that may scarcely matter to LaBute, a gifted and corrosive wordsmith who appears intent, by now, on shoving all romantic couplings into the meat grinder of his misanthropic design.
  81. A synthetic yet shrill sadomasochistic cartoon.
  82. The frustration of this good-hearted, off-key warble of an indie, written by Rose with Robert Cary, who directed, is that the filmmaking pales when compared with the classic elements of 1950s and early '60s romantic musicals to which it pays homage.
  83. An old-fashioned romance-and-sickness picture, a publicity-grabbing sex picture, an Apatow-lite horny-boys picture, and a liberal satire on pharmaceutical-industry excesses committed in pursuit of pill sales - all in one.
  84. The result isn't liberated from the stage; it's trapped, with waxworks literalness, onscreen.
  85. This is one of those films in which the Act of Driving becomes a 10-minute statement of high emptiness; Dumont even manages to make sex in the desert boring.
  86. As it moves from the drizzly to the overly stormy, Rain freights a young girl's self-destructive eagerness to lose her virginity with so much danger and even horror that it's as if the events were trying to make up for the film's previous lack of drama.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 58 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Forgoes the destructo silliness of the original in favor of one too many bland self help subplots.
  87. More potent than anything in Snakes on a Plane is the fantasy offscreen: that if enough people talk up their desire to see this film and, at the same time, take an overt delight in what an unabashed piece of junk it is, they will fuse with the hype, with the movie's mystique. They will not just watch Snakes on a Plane; they will own it.
  88. The movie zips around without any true forward momentum. The stars carry you along, though.
  89. Funny, director and co-writer Dani Levy suggests with no little coldness, how the scent of money can do what religion, ideology, and ethical principles cannot.
  90. A movie so stuffed with eccentricity, it rips at least a couple of seams.
  91. With its smooth skinned cast and demonized adults, doesn't feel very authentic.

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