Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 6,097 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Hell or High Water
Lowest review score: 0 Left Behind
Score distribution:
6097 movie reviews
  1. The Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei has achieved a prominence that makes him, in effect, the Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn of the Twitter age. He's also the least stuffy of dissidents, and Alison Klayman's stirring, important documentary catches his complex humanity.
  2. Like everything else in this superb work of art, ''Shrinking Lover'' is exquisitely Almodóvarian. It's funny, tender, a little shocking, and it pays homage to what we know about movies: that they can move us beyond words.
  3. Blue Valentine is lushly touching and gorgeously told.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Delightfull time-travel comedy.
  4. It's been a while since a movie made the game of love this winning.
  5. A beautifully sinister and transfixing entertainment-age daydream.
  6. Zodiac never veers from its stoically gripping, police-blotter tone, yet it begins to take on the quality of a dream.
  7. This is one of the year's best. To paraphrase the Wild Thing named KW, I could eat it up, I love it so.
  8. It took director-producer Leon Gast 22 years to edit and finance When We Were Kings, his thrilling documentary about the legendary 1974 heavyweight-championship fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman in Zaire. But the lag time has only deepened the impact of this thrilling documentary: All sad thoughts of Ali as a wounded warrior fall away in the glow of seeing the champ at his best.
  9. The rare movie that turns cruelty into art.
  10. The power of this great movie -- part comedy, part tragedy, part satire, mostly masterpiece -- is in the details.
  11. In this typically exquisite, nuanced, memory-infused work from master British filmmaker Terence Davies, we believe every minute of the torment of Hester (Rachel Weisz).
  12. Facing a diagnosis of Alzheimer's, the older woman enrolls in a poetry class, desperate to find the words to describe beauty before language fails her. She does even better: She herself becomes a kind of poem about what it means to really see the world.
  13. Keira Knightley, in a witty, vibrant, altogether superb performance, plays Lizzie's sparky, questing nature as a matter of the deepest personal sacrifice.
  14. Circles the heart of noisy, modern Tehran with an informal, documentary-like freedom that is thrilling in its naturalism.
  15. It's a lesson in character to hear directors from David Lynch (digital believer) to Christopher Nolan (celluloid diehard) spout off.
  16. Carries so much impacted menace and visual narrative gamesmanship that it brought back some of the excitement I felt nearly a decade ago watching Quentin Tarantino's ''Reservoir Dogs.''
  17. The knowledge that Rembrandt recycled his own paintings doesn't minimize the scene in Frederick Wiseman's documentary where we see an X-ray of one of the Dutch master's portraits — and go, ''Wow!''
  18. It's better than good; it's such a crackling and mature and accomplished movie that it just about restores your faith.
  19. This story of a 12-year-old boy who drops through the net of middle-class life invites us-in each shimmering frame-to gaze upon the world with a child's freshly awakening vision.
  20. The stunning images aren't enough for Herzog, though. He wants us to see how these quirky researchers, in their lust to explore, are acting out a drive as primitive as nature: the need to break away from the world in order to find it.
  21. This enveloping dream of an epic narrative experiment comes from the great Chilean-born, France-based filmmaker Raúl Ruiz (Time Regained).
  22. Mr. Lazarescu is that rich and riveting a film of universal small human moments and big-system failure.
  23. By far the best Judd Apatow comedy that Judd Apatow had nothing at all to do with.
  24. Watching Eternal Sunshine, you don't just watch a love story -- you fall in love with what love really is.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A movie with exquisite period detail. [8 Apr 1994]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  25. The result: This great work of art has the potential to change the world.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    [Tarantino's] ability to take what seem like minor conversational themes and dovetail them onto later exchanges for maximum comic effect is close to genius. And the action can be literally heart-stopping.
  26. The gorgeous music includes Ralph Vaughan Williams' wafting tone poem ''The Lark Ascending'' -- apt in describing an artist who might well be part bird.
  27. A conventionally heightened series of escapes and clashes and hide-and-seek gambits, yet the way the film has been made, nothing that happens seems inevitable -- which is to say, anything seems possible. There's a word for that sensation. It's called excitement.
  28. It's a scrumptious and dizzy-spirited lark, a what-the-hell-let's-rob-the-casino flick made with so much wit and brains and dazzle and virtuosity that the sheer speed and cleverness of the caper hits you like a shot of pure oxygen.
  29. Oren Moverman's Rampart is a terrific film: tense, shocking, complex, mesmerizing.
  30. Achieves its exquisite tension--deepening beautifully from a "Death in Venice" setup to an imaginative meditation, on art and life, of uncommon sensitivity.
  31. The miracle of the movie is the way that director Alfonso Cuarón, using special effects and 3-D with a nearly poetic simplicity and command, places the audience right up there in space along with them.
  32. With an authenticity that is tender and merciless, the movie shows you what it looks like when youth rebellion becomes a form of fascism.
  33. Stunning, fully formed masterpiece.
  34. The film, by seasoned cinematographer Dror Moreh, is a feat — of access and of passionate and appropriately unsettling political commentary.
  35. Potent and eye-opening documentary.
  36. Hell or High Water isn’t a flashy movie, but it has an undeniably resonant sense of small-scale justice, not to mention an authentic sense of place that will remind you of other Texas-set masterpieces like John Sayles’ "Lone Star" and the Coen brothers’ "No Country for Old Men." See it, and then spread the word.
  37. A marvelous movie.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Bruce Beresford's tightly focused adaptation retains all the impact of its Pulitzer Prize-winning stage original. Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman give exceptional performances as the aging widow and the sage black chauffeur who enlightens her in the segregated South.
  38. These 173 minutes don't drag, they waltz.
  39. Brilliant and psychologically transfixing documentary.
  40. Rapt, heady, and startling: the most profound documentary I've seen this decade.
  41. Definition eludes the delicate pleasures of this marvelous, idiosyncratic movie collage.
  42. Until Once, I'm not sure that I'd ever seen a small-scale, nonstylized, kitchen-sink drama in which the songs take on the majesty and devotion of a musical dream.
  43. Yagira's performance is so extraordinary, it won him the best actor prize at the 2004 Cannes film festival.
  44. The picture moves with stealth, enjoying its own thriller-ness as hints are laid and mislaid. There's a sense that Hitchcock is hovering in the background and cheering for Auteuil, who musters all his French superstardom to play a man having his mask of blandness torn off.
  45. Room is more than the title of one of the year’s most powerful movies — it’s a state of mind that’s unbearably tense and as claustrophobic as a straitjacket
  46. The setting is somewhere between a post-WWII Brigadoon and the environs of Marcel Carn classic "Children of Paradise," but the story is as timely as this morning's news from Europe.
  47. The first animated feature produced entirely on computer is a magically witty and humane entertainment, a hellzapoppin fairy tale about a roomful of suburban toys who come to life when humans aren't around.
  48. What's astonishing about Sofia Coppola's enthralling new movie is the precision, maturity, and originality with which the confident young writer-director communicates so clearly in a cinematic language all her own.
  49. Cary Fukunaga’s stark, beautifully shot drama was likely never meant to be a blockbuster; its brutal account of a child soldier in an unnamed African country is far too discomfiting for wider audiences. It absolutely does belong on a big screen, though, and more important, it just deserves to be seen.
  50. The film takes off from formula elements-it's yet another variation on "Die Hard"-but it manipulates those elements so skillfully, with such a canny mixture of delirium and restraint, that I walked out of the picture with the rare sensation that every gaudy thrill had been earned.
  51. A delicate yet haunting movie, a meditation on friendship, on the roots of bohemianism, on the sad comedy of madness.
  52. Jennifer Baichwal's gorgeous documentary Manufactured Landscapes amplifies the powerful work of Edward Burtynsky, a Canadian artist who specializes in large-scale photographs of terrain transformed by civilization into rivers and tides of industrial ugliness.
  53. Trier's compassion for what it takes to survive, mixed with the love he bestows on Oslo, is rewardingly profound.
  54. It's a work of art that deserves a space cleared for its angry, nervous beauty.
  55. Arenas' life zigzags before us in a manner as heady and unpredictable as it must have felt to the man who lived it.
  56. I suppose you could call The Big Short a comedy. It’s very, very funny. But it’s also a tragedy. Behind every easy drive-by laugh is a sincere holler of outrage.
  57. In The Beaches of Agnès, you get addicted to watching Agnès Varda watch the world.
  58. A marvelous rock doc that manages to be wistful, tasty, and jam-kicking at the same time.
  59. It's a lovely, original, Australian take on a climactic moment usually thought of as all American.
  60. A memory of the automobile in which a father drove away from his family provides the title for Blue Car but no hint of the power of writer-director Karen Moncrieff's superb feature debut.
  61. Presents Glass as a masterfully corrupt fabulist who convinced himself of the ultimate seductive lie, which is that there can't be anything wrong with telling people what they want to hear.
  62. A confidently original, engrossing interpretation.
  63. An existential chain reaction, yet as remarkable as his cinematic gamesmanship is the way that he traces the anatomy of feeling in Lola.
  64. Can be interpreted politically or even biblically or not at all, as the elemental struggles between dominance and submission, impulse and action, man and nature, father and son, play out to their stunning conclusion.
  65. This is a great film, and a triumph of creativity and courage over repression.
  66. The most resonant and haunting movie I've seen this year.
  67. Fierce, loving, and electric, this movie's got bite as well as bark.
  68. It's hard to think of the last time a Pixar film made you go ''Wow!'' That's part of why The LEGO Movie is such outrageous and intoxicating fun.
  69. The Girlfriend Experience is one of Steven Soderbergh's bite-size, semi-improvised, shot-on-DV doodles (like Bubble or Full Frontal), and it's the best one he's made.
  70. The lightness with which Buñuel was able to insert the little jokes and knife stabs of surrealism he loved so much is, in fact, divine.
  71. The title embraces the richness of Kechiche's beautiful film, which captures the rhythms of displacement and hardship, the bond of family meals, and even the daily routines of the magnificent women who are part of Slimane's life.
  72. Like a great novel from a more expansive bygone age, The Best of Youth is full of big thoughts; like a great soap opera, it's also full of sharp plot turns, vibrant characters, and great talk. It is, in short, the best of cinema.
  73. The Wizard of Oz remains the weirdest, scariest, kookiest, most haunting and indelible kid-flick-that's-really-for-adults ever made in Hollywood.
  74. A deeply straightforward yet beautifully crafted documentary.
  75. A film of wonderful looseness and innovation. Set free to film fakes, the director is the real thing.
  76. Bleak, brilliant, and unsparing.
  77. A triumph -- Demme's finest work since "The Silence of the Lambs," and a movie that tingles with life.
  78. No
    The movie — the third in a trilogy of powerful political dramas from Larraín, including "Tony Manero" and "Post Mortem" — uses period detail, archival footage, and '80s-era technology to create an excellently authentic, bleached, crummy-looking document of a great democratic accomplishment.
  79. Bold and brilliant.
  80. To see Gone With the Wind on a big screen again is to weep for the fearlessness with which Hollywood once believed the sublime was possible.
  81. Errol Morris may have been put on earth to make The Fog of War, a stunning portrait of Robert S. McNamara that closes a year of outstanding nonfiction movies on a high note.
  82. Still the grandest of all science-fiction movies.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  83. With the pitiless, devastating Fat Girl, Catherine Breillat puts men and women, boys and girls on notice: When fantasy, hypocrisy, and manipulation mix in a wet, sandy place, you dive into sex at your own risk.
  84. The movie sparkles with witty self-awareness.
  85. The movie is so hilariously sly about something so fetishistically trivial that at times it appears to take in an entire culture through a lens made of cheese.
  86. This documentary about the triumph of the New Hollywood employs a treasure trove of interviews and clips to create a rich understanding of the many forces -- cultural undertows, really -- that flowed together to fill the void left by the dying studio system.
  87. The storytelling is the series' best, with a zingy balance of drama, humor, and Deep Thoughts (in a screenplay by Leigh Brackett and Lawrence Kasdan, directed with confident exuberance by Irvin Kershner). [Special Edition]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A masterpiece.
  88. Ceylan, who also served as cinematographer, frames the affecting, unstudied performances in gorgeously chosen shots and nonevents that sometimes teeter on the edge of comedy before knocking us breathless with their emotional power.
  89. A movie masterpiece...is Lars von Trier's ecstatic magnum opus on the themes of depression, cataclysm, and the way the world might end.
  90. I'm Not There lets you hear it again, more majestically than ever.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Jim Jarmusch’s minimalist meditation on a trio of misfits who wander across the U.S. Shot in crisp black and white, the film is a series of 67 single takes punctuated by moments of black screen.
  91. The movie is grand and immersive. It plugs us into the final months of Lincoln's presidency with a purity that makes us feel transported as though by time machine.
  92. A gripping documentary that uses voluminous period evidence — unedited news footage, tape recordings of SLA leader Cinque's rants — to brilliantly reconstruct the entire freak event.
  93. The movie is small, local, and idiosyncratic. Then again, it's also a thing of beauty and originality - and for that, sustained huzzahs are in order.
  94. It's the wildest screen comedy in a long time, and also the smartest, the most fearlessly inspired, and the snort-out-loud funniest.

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