Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 6,020 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Miss Bala
Lowest review score: 0 The Comebacks
Score distribution:
6020 movie reviews
  1. Down to the Bone achieves what only the best independent films have: making life, at its most unvarnished, a journey.
  2. American Splendor presents Pekar as drawn on the page, Pekar as brilliantly interpreted by Paul Giamatti, and the actual Pekar, in the double role of narrator and interview subject -- sometimes all at once. The magic act is thrilling, and truly surprising.
  3. Nimble, engrossing, and journalistically eye-opening, a movie that pulls into focus 30 years of porn in America. It also pulls no punches.
  4. Stone takes his characters right over the top, rubbing our noses in our own lust for excess, and some viewers are bound to say that he's gone too far. Yet this may be one case where too far is just far enough-where a gifted filmmaker has transformed his own attraction to violence into an art of depraved catharsis.
  5. A deliciously amusing socio-culinary prank.
  6. Like Michael Apted in his "Seven Up!" documentary series, Linklater makes you feel as if you're watching a photograph as it develops in the darkroom.
  7. The serious accusations are leavened by the moments of brimming, illogical, intimate neighborly dailiness the filmmaker also captures with warmth and infectious high spirits.
  8. If they handed out an Academy Award for Most Gripping Graphs and Charts, this film would take it.
  9. The most excitingly original movie of the year.
  10. For sheer dramatic wallop outpowers virtually every fiction feature I've seen this year.
  11. It's Ejiofor's extraordinary performance that holds 12 Years a Slave together.
  12. In the Shadow of the Moon finds new resonance in the moment when America redefined progress -- but also when it heeded the siren song of a world so desolate it reminded you what a paradise ours truly is.
  13. It's the first Hollywood Iraq movie to remind me of a Vietnam film like Coming Home, and it does more than disturb. It scalds, moves, and heals.
  14. This thrilling stop-motion animated adventure is a high point in Selick's career of creating handcrafted wonderlands of beauty blended with deep, disconcerting creepiness.
  15. This is Robert Redford doing what too many stars should do and don't: taking a chance. And reinventing his art. It's an extraordinary thing to see.
  16. A no-frills docu-Dogma plainness, yet Miller lingers on invisible, nearly psychic nuances, leaping into digressions of memory and desire. She boxes these women's souls right open for us.
  17. A movie as layered and enthralling as its subject.
  18. Brokeback Mountain is that rare thing, a big Hollywood weeper with a beautiful ache at its center. It's a modern-age Western that turns into a quietly revolutionary love story.
  19. Madly original, cheekily political, altogether exciting District 9.
  20. Think of this witty, economically gory little tour de force as "28 Days Later" written by linguist Noam Chomsky.
  21. It’s the rarest kind of moviegoing experience: an absolute masterpiece.
  22. As he rises to each challenge, you realize that von Trier, the most exalted of prankish sadists, has orchestrated the filmmaking equivalent of the story of Job. The Five Obstructions glories in art, life, and the faith that binds them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A hypnotically engrossing thriller that spins along on the dreams and anxieties of its characters.
  23. It’s stunningly ambitious and thrillingly alive the way the best movies are.
  24. A funny and madly arresting new documentary.
  25. A doozy of a French gangster pic that, in its beautifully refurbished and pithily resubtitled re-release, turns out to be one of the highlights of the 2005 movie year.
  26. Rohmer treasures the undervalued glories of discourse and the intimacy of conversation over the obviousness of action or sexual display.
  27. Dizzily rich, witty, and satisfying.
  28. David Cronenberg's brilliant movie -- without a doubt one of the very best of the year.
  29. Thanks to Gabe Polsky's enthralling new documentary, we finally get to see these athletes for who they really were—it humanizes a group of men who were cast by history in the role of villains.
  30. J.M.W. Turner was a master of light and image, but what stands out most about him in Mike Leigh's captivating biographical film is a sound. Playing the renowned Victorian-era English painter, Timothy Spall grunts and expectorates his way through his scenes, chugging along with the phlegmy belch of an old jalopy or, as the film suggests more than once, a snuffling pig.
  31. It taps into every parent's worst nightmare — the horror of being unable to protect an out-of-control child.
  32. If ever there were an actor ripe to ''McConaughnesize'' his career, it's Jude Law — and guess what, he has done it, spectacularly, in Dom Hemingway.
  33. Eastwood directs Mystic River with an invigorated grace and gravitas. This is a true American beauty of a movie, a tale of men and their bonds told by and for adults who value the old-fashioned Hollywood-studio notion of narrative.
  34. To call Match Point Woody Allen's comeback would be an understatement - it's the most vital return to form for any director since Robert Altman made "The Player."
  35. Tsai builds this shimmering story with deft, deadpan wit and a warm, understated love of the absurd, both in life and afterlife.
  36. It's a mad cycle of arrogance and despair, and Bloody Sunday etches it onto your nervous system.
  37. It whisks you to another world, then makes it every inch our own.
  38. To say that Eastwood, who directed, has done a first-rate job of adaptation fails to do him justice. What he's brought off is closer to alchemy.
  39. A small cubist masterpiece about crime and punishment set in that most split-level of environments, Los Angeles.
  40. There are moments in A Little Princess--particularly Cuaron's Indian play-within-the-play, which is nearly avant-garde in its conception--when you may just want to clap from pleasure. My advice to you is: Go ahead, you're a grown-up. [26 May 26 1995]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  41. Nothing good happens in 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, the riveting, horrifying chronicle of an illegal abortion performed in 1987 when Ceauescu's dictatorial hand still gripped Romania's throat. And yet no lover of greatness in filmmaking will want to look away from one of the very best movies of 2007.
  42. As tricky and satisfying as any of David Mamet's airless cinematic shell games. Mamet's films are all plot and no atmosphere; this one has a squalid, urban-greed-meets-the-gutter mood that lends its filigreed cleverness an unusually resonant kick.
  43. Toy Story 3 is a salute to the magic of making believe.
  44. What it does have is an overwhelming bittersweet melancholy at the passing of life from middle age into…well, you could call it late middle age.
  45. Like any great myth, Pan's Labyrinth encodes its messages through displays of magic. And like any good fairy tale, it is also embroidered with threads of death and loss.
  46. This triumphant sequel to the hard-to-top 2002 original may be the first great comic-book movie in the age of self-help and CGI wizardry, an entertainment in which both the thrills and the therapeutic personal growth are well earned.
  47. Emotionally mesmerizing.
  48. One of the unshowiest and most true-blooded epics of Americana you're ever likely to see.
  49. They're like gods at play, paragons of pure delight, as they mock and feign their way through a universe of mere mortals. To see the movie again is to realize that they were never entirely of this earth and that they never will be.
  50. Working with affectionate mockery, the Coens take the cinder-block-synagogue banality of American Jewish life in 1967 and make it look as archly exotic as the loopy Scandinavian-American winterscape of "Fargo."
  51. It's not art, but it's mighty fun.
  52. Watch for the director's own mother, Lili Kosashvili, a standout as Zaza's fierce, stately mama.
  53. The result is a movie, and Cannes Palme d'Or winner, of riveting power and sadness, a great match of film and filmmaker -- and star, too.
  54. Director Bahman Ghobadi (Turtles Can Fly) shot his faux documentary in secret, and the close-to-the-ground style compensates for the tenuous narrative structure by capturing the energy and variety of Tehran's music scene in all its bravery.
  55. Sweetness makes the raunch in this honestly funny movie even funnier.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Has a genial, funky charm.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    From the opening shot of a burnt-orange GTO cruising a high school parking lot to the strains of Aerosmith's ''Sweet Emotion,'' Richard Linklater's film nails mid-'70s adolescence so precisely that you'll need Clearasil by the end credits.
  56. Greenwald floats the vital issue of whether Wal-Mart should be restrained by antimonopoly regulations, but his real question is cultural: Even with its rock-bottom prices, is Wal-Mart in the best interest of American consumers?
  57. You'll laugh - a lot - but you'll also shed tears of recognition at this funny, salty, strife-torn look at the agony and ecstasy of family.
  58. Cyrus cues us to expect it to go over the top, but the film never does. That may be its neatest trick
  59. This Is 40 isn't always hilarious, but it's ticklishly honest and droll about all the things being a parent can do to a relationship. And why it's still worth it.
  60. It's the beaming movie-star intensity of the complicated comic Carrey in the role of the dominant lover and Obi-Wan Kenobi McGregor as the gentle beloved that makes this unfettered, stranger-than-fiction picture pop.
  61. With the exception of Waleed F. Zuaiter, who does a remarkable good-cop act as an Israeli agent, the cast is composed of first-time actors who bring realism to a tragic story. It manages to punch you in the gut and break your heart at the same time.
  62. If the result is often as glib as the targets it's satirizing, it's also driven by a cruelly distilled joy. Wag the Dog is an ode to the thrill of deception, a thrill embodied in Hoffman's inspired performance.
  63. Brashly engaging.
  64. Here, in paranoid, bad acid trip form, is the real birth of girl power.
  65. The great Polish director Andrzej Wajda musters the power of classical filmmaking and personal emotional investment to dramatize a stunning atrocity long covered up.
  66. Branagh, chewing on a plummy Georgia accent, makes the divorced, boozing, and womanizing Magruder a smug yet touchingly vulnerable legal player.
  67. The first Irish creation I've seen in ages to pull off the high-difficulty feat of trafficking in grit, drollery, and emotion without turning to blarney as a crutch.
  68. The clammy power of Young Adam lies as much in the frank, emotional nakedness the actors bring to their roles under Mackenzie's care as in the baroque hopelessness of the plot.
  69. Darkly funny, twisty-cool existential tragicomedy, loaded with smart notions and filmed like a surrealist dream.
  70. Anyone who thinks that Josh Hartnett isn't a true movie star should see his riveting, high-wire performance in August.
  71. Has a rowdy, jumpin'-jive vivacity. It's not quite as emotionally rounded as ''Shrek'' was... but it's got heart and delirium in equal doses, as well as a firecracker rhythm all its own.
  72. There’s a raw, tangible humanity to nearly every scene that sets the film gratifyingly apart.
  73. What matters for today's hero is the good fight, and Gladiator KOs us with a doozy.
  74. Spins a thorny tale of political corruption laced with personal sleaze.
  75. A superior lyrical ragamuffin Irish drama.
  76. Buoyantly clever and amusing.
  77. Wan masterfully tightens the vise on the audience's nerves, using mood and sound effects for shocks that never feel cheap (the harmless kids' game of hide-and-clap has never been so bloodcurdling).
  78. Like "Far From Heaven," Carol mines society’s narrow-mindedness and the dangers of living a double life. But what was true more than a half century ago remains true now: The heart wants what it wants, society and propriety be damned.
  79. Dark and giddy at the same time, Leaving Las Vegas takes us into dreamy, intoxicated places that no movie about an alcoholic has gone before.
  80. Ray
    As a musical biography, Ray is driven by the primal excitement of rock-and-soul at the moment of its discovery.
  81. A haunted-house movie that has some of the most shivery and indelible images I've seen in any horror film in decades. Yes, it's that unsettling.
  82. A rich, dark, pulpy mess of entanglements that fulfills all the requirements of the genre, and is told with an ease and gusto that make the pulp tasty.
  83. A jolting, artfully made drama set in and around a suburban playground somewhere between "American Beauty" and "In the Bedroom" on America's psychic highway.
  84. An artful piece of exploitation vérité.
  85. The beauty of Baadasssss! is the way Mario Van Peebles salutes his father's truth by coaxing it into legend.
  86. A funny, shrewd, no-bull family comedy about the relationship between mothers and teenage daughters that allows Curtis the comedian to remember her days as a slinky starlet while making use of her wisdom as the mother of an adolescent girl herself.
  87. Has a fractured fairy-tale charm, even if it isn't a nonstop laugh riot.
  88. A dizzyingly tense and creepy workout.
  89. Enchantingly witty.
  90. Gliding from the physical to the metaphysical, Andersen reveals how films like ''Chinatown'' effectively remade the reality of Los Angeles, replacing history with myth in a way that now anchors the city more than that history itself does.
  91. Who Killed the Electric Car? makes you angry, and also sad, to live in a country where innovation could be contrived into an enemy.
  92. It's all very French, very intricate, and -- this is Rivette's magic -- seemingly as light as air.
  93. Young Adult bumps along with nasty swerves, middle finger proudly in the air, toward an ending blessedly free of anything warm, fuzzy, or optimistic. Now that's adult entertainment.
  94. Bateman deserves props for sustaining Bad Words as a little balancing act between sulfurously funny hatred and humanity.
  95. Using New York’s famed apartment house the Dakota for all its cavernous shadowiness, and exploiting the 23-year-old Farrow’s tremulous space-child vulnerability to underscore her terror and solitude, Polanski worked with an elegant restraint that less talented filmmakers have been trying to mimic ever since.
  96. Does more than capture the excitement of marching bands; it gets their clockwork beauty as well.
  97. This lone, fallen Nazi's obsessive distance from his actions is enough to give The Specialist a lingering chill.

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