Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,127 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Power of Nightmares: The Rise of the Politics of Fear
Lowest review score: 0 Assisted Living
Score distribution:
5,127 movie reviews
  1. Lords of Dogtown is a docudrama, rare in its grit and authenticity, that also strives for the mythical youth-rebel excitement of something like "8 Mile."
  2. A confidently original, engrossing interpretation.
  3. Definition eludes the delicate pleasures of this marvelous, idiosyncratic movie collage.
  4. Pawlikowski has made a romance that becomes a horror movie in which love, more than anything around it, is a delusionary fever to fear.
  5. A film of wonderful looseness and innovation. Set free to film fakes, the director is the real thing.
  6. The filmmaking is as strong as the subject matter, with an elegant structure.
  7. Those Oompa-Loompas are the beat, and soul, of Burton's finest movie since "Ed Wood": a madhouse kiddie musical with a sweet-and-sour heart.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Delightfull time-travel comedy.
  8. It's a quiet dream of a movie, a vision of loneliness giving way to love, then to loneliness again; it's like "Vertigo" remade in a sedately haunted style of Japanese lyricism.
  9. Amy Adams in a performance as deep as it is delightful, is the film's heart and also its flaky, wonderstruck soul.
  10. A movie of uncommon sweetness and delight.
  11. Rapt, heady, and startling: the most profound documentary I've seen this decade.
  12. But it is the steady accretion of hundreds of small moments in this elegant, high-spirited, intensely satisfying production -- the director's third American movie, but the first to approach the dazzle of his Hong Kong stuff -- that, toted up, makes everything right about this des- perately welcome thriller.
  13. David Cronenberg's brilliant movie -- without a doubt one of the very best of the year.
  14. Bestows generous blessings on all that's good in Englishness, in moviedom, and, of course, in cheese.
  15. Keira Knightley, in a witty, vibrant, altogether superb performance, plays Lizzie's sparky, questing nature as a matter of the deepest personal sacrifice.
  16. A doozy of a French gangster pic that, in its beautifully refurbished and pithily resubtitled re-release, turns out to be one of the highlights of the 2005 movie year.
  17. Down to the Bone achieves what only the best independent films have: making life, at its most unvarnished, a journey.
  18. Brokeback Mountain is that rare thing, a big Hollywood weeper with a beautiful ache at its center. It's a modern-age Western that turns into a quietly revolutionary love story.
  19. One of the wonders of the holiday season.
  20. To call Match Point Woody Allen's comeback would be an understatement - it's the most vital return to form for any director since Robert Altman made "The Player."
  21. It's a fluid cinematic essay, rooted in painstakingly assembled evidence, that heightens and cleanses your perceptions.
  22. Munich, Steven Spielberg's spectacularly gripping and unsettling new movie, is a grave and haunted film, yet its power lies in its willingness to be a work of brutal excitement.
  23. The picture moves with stealth, enjoying its own thriller-ness as hints are laid and mislaid. There's a sense that Hitchcock is hovering in the background and cheering for Auteuil, who musters all his French superstardom to play a man having his mask of blandness torn off.
  24. Of the idiosyncratic ''little'' movies that Soderbergh has made to clear his head (Full Frontal, Schizopolis), this is the first that truly connects.
  25. The first great, mind-tickling treat of the new movie year.
  26. The film takes off from formula elements-it's yet another variation on "Die Hard"-but it manipulates those elements so skillfully, with such a canny mixture of delirium and restraint, that I walked out of the picture with the rare sensation that every gaudy thrill had been earned.
  27. The enthralling spirit of Dave Chappelle's Block Party, its mood of exuberant democracy, extends to every rap and soul performance in the film.
  28. To say that Eastwood, who directed, has done a first-rate job of adaptation fails to do him justice. What he's brought off is closer to alchemy.
  29. This beautiful, terrible story is not easily forgotten.

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