Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,105 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The LEGO Movie
Lowest review score: 0 Sleepover
Score distribution:
5,105 movie reviews
  1. Mr. Lazarescu is that rich and riveting a film of universal small human moments and big-system failure.
  2. The picture was made in 1969 and is only now being released in the U.S., in a beautiful restoration supervised by original cinematographer Pierre Lhomme.
  3. Russian Dolls captures how being a sexual cad has become an essential phase in the life of the modern male.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It boasts a more consistent tone, better special effects (such as villains throwing buses around like paper planes), and even an affecting love story.
  4. Half Nelson offers an opportunity to marvel, once again, at the dazzling talent of Ryan Gosling for playing young men as believable as they are psychologically trip-wired.
  5. "Andy Warhol" makes you see that beneath the gargoyle hipster mask, he filled that emptiness with an art of transcendent sincerity.
  6. Maggie Gyllenhaal is such a miracle of an actress that she makes you respond to the innocence of Sherry's desperate, selfish destruction.
  7. It's in all the moments where little happens that Reichardt is most amazing, investing even a gas-station pit stop with perfect emotional pitch.
  8. 49 Up is a precious document, and must viewing.
  9. Brilliant and psychologically transfixing documentary.
  10. A work of staggering intelligence and emotional force -- a mosaic of broken dreams.
  11. Sweet Land is a movie of extraordinary tenderness, in which Reaser and Guinee, using a language of looks, make you happy to think about what love once might have been.
  12. Around town, Stephen Fry ("Peter's Friends"), as a fluty artiste, dogs Flora with his devotion and declares, "I'm engorgedly in love with you!" That's how I feel about this gem.
  13. The calm poetry of the cinematography offsets the mess of the politics to stunning effect.
  14. Relaunches the series by doing something I wouldn't have thought possible: It turns Bond into a human being again -- a gruffly charming yet volatile chap who may be the swank king stud of the Western world, but who still has room for rage, fear, vulnerability, love.
  15. The ensemble cast shared the best-actor award at the 2006 Cannes film festival -- and rightly so.
  16. Clint Eastwood's profound, magisterial, and gripping companion piece to his ambitious meditation on wartime image and reality, "Flags of Our Fathers."
  17. It's a work of art that deserves a space cleared for its angry, nervous beauty.
  18. It's a poison bonbon tastier than just about anything else out there.
  19. Like any great myth, Pan's Labyrinth encodes its messages through displays of magic. And like any good fairy tale, it is also embroidered with threads of death and loss.
  20. Nader became famous as a "consumer advocate," but as the thrilling first hour of An Unreasonable Man makes clear, that humdrum bureaucratic term didn't do justice to his courage, his vision.
  21. The serious accusations are leavened by the moments of brimming, illogical, intimate neighborly dailiness the filmmaker also captures with warmth and infectious high spirits.
  22. Zodiac never veers from its stoically gripping, police-blotter tone, yet it begins to take on the quality of a dream.
  23. There are moments in A Little Princess--particularly Cuaron's Indian play-within-the-play, which is nearly avant-garde in its conception--when you may just want to clap from pleasure. My advice to you is: Go ahead, you're a grown-up. [26 May 26 1995]
  24. Way ahead of its time 30 years ago, and just as stunning today, Killer of Sheep is one of those marvels of original moviemaking that keeps hope of artistic independence alive.
  25. It's cleansing to see the facts laid out with intimacy and rigor, and the film earns the comparison it makes to the squelching of due process for some of today's terror suspects.
  26. Grindhouse, like "Ed Wood" and "Boogie Nights," celebrates how certain low-grade entertainment, viewed in hindsight, looks different now than it did then, since we can see the ''innocence'' of its creation -- the handmade quality of it -- in a world not yet ruled by corporate technology.
  27. A love poem to the New York City of the '50s and '60s, when Smith, the visionary of camp (Andy Warhol stole from him), more or less invented performance art.
  28. Extraordinary new documentary that turns Robert Crumb's twisted life story into a disturbing, exhilarating work of biographical art.
  29. A wee romantic charmer, a delectable Dixie screwball romp that never loses its spry sense of discovery.

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