Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,807 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Sopranos: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1374
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1374
1,374 tv reviews
  1. This season, the show's only gotten better — deeper, richer, more true to its guiding intention of presenting people with Texas twangs as something other than the media cliche of rubes with bad taste.
  2. There's a lot to love about Murder One, bless its parodically sleazy, shrewdly opportunistic, talent-engorged heart.
  3. Instantly addictive.
  4. Neither fully a comedy nor a drama, Transparent is simply transcendent. [19/26 Sep 2014, p.123]
  5. It's the sarcasm (see: Adam Scott), smart dialogue, and refreshing take on the workplace comedy that make the somewhat depressing premise a totally raucous party.
  6. [Herskovitz and Zwick] have transcended their occasional tendency toward both pretension and sentimentality to come up with a brave, bracing show — one that is, like their previous work, unafraid to make white, middle-class, suburban people look like the infuriating, interesting wrecks they so often can be.
  7. The X-Files is hitting the ground running—albeit knee-deep in murk and murder, conspiracy and cosmic confluences.
  8. The underrated bigamy show returns from a too-long hiatus with a plot-packed season 3 opener, and, not for the first time, the females deliver the best moments.
  9. Its main purpose is to confront the taboo, and whether that means exploring just how far Louie will go into the "experimental" side of masturbation in the season premiere or simply digging into his ugliest prejudices about overweight women, the show can be revelatory.
  10. This may be the first TV show since Pee-wee's Playhouse to treasure youth even as it embodies all of its contradictions, craziness, hopes, and fears (and I'd like to point out that Freaks is the only hour-long sitcom I've ever seen that sustains funniness for its full 60 minutes).
  11. Who killed Laura Palmer? Many viewers, tired of the hype, are saying, Who cares? I say it too, but as praise. Plot is irrelevant; moments are everything. Lynch and Frost have mastered a way to make a weekly series endlessly interesting.
  12. Seinfeld is now a revitalized show, snappy and gratifyingly complicated once more.
  13. This series has become as dependably amusing as any show on television.
  14. Hannigan gets a preemptive EW Emmy award for best supporting actress this year. Whether weeping over a breakup with her werewolf boyfriend, Oz (Seth Green), or offering dating advice to Buffy suitor Riley Finn ('She likes cheese!'), this Willow does not bend from the challenges she's been handed.
  15. It's becoming obvious that The Simpsons, now in its second season, isn't just a product of media hype: Matt Groening's cartoon family is one of the few current works of popular art that possess wit and integrity.
  16. The terrific thing about the new season, starting with the introduction of Weaver [Laura Innes], is that personalities on ER have become as complicated and messy as brain surgery.
  17. Well into its third season, X-Files shows no sign of flagging inspiration; its ability to find paranoia in the paranormal appears to be limitless.
  18. New Girl stokes comeback hopes with an inspired season 4 premiere.
  19. Miraculous ... One of the myriad greatnesses of The Sopranos is that, to paraphrase the Godfather paraphrase that Steven Van Zandt's Silvio frequently quotes, it keeps pulling you back in — back in on yourself, appealing to your basest instincts, to your fundamental urge to hear a bloody story well told.
  20. The playful atmosphere of Now and Again provides a blissful kick unlike anything else in prime time.
  21. Slowly, a smartly constructed epic is taking shape.
  22. Homicide seems to have found just the right balance: Almost every week, it is as well acted and tough-minded as it ever was, while also offering the sort of snappy stories that can grab any viewer looking for merciful relief from the mannered eccentricity of that icky Picket Fences.
  23. Lean and gratifyingly mean ... uncommonly sharp.
  24. It's loose and rambling; its dramatic climaxes don't coincide neatly with the conclusion of any given episode. Its dialogue, overseen by creator David Simon ... is so good it often sounds improvised. One criticism of the show I've read is that it's repetitive (in showing the slow process of how the police bring down bad guys). But what those critics don't get is that those qualities are exactly what make 'The Wire' the funkiest cop show on TV.
  25. Hannibal captures your imagination with the prospect of Graham using his imagination to figure a way out. [28 Feb 2014, p.65]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  26. Six hours of raucous laughter, bone-rattling suspense, and god-awful tragedy. ... The Corner is a marvel of craft.
  27. There's a sense in which the lag in time between the third and fourth seasons has resulted in scripts that have been too carefully crafted; the ironies and parallelisms are sometimes overworked, excessively neat. ... Still, 'The Sopranos' -- bursting with livid energy and daringly rotten at its core -- is full of scenes that'll leave you breathless in their audacity, goofball non sequiturs, and profound cynicism.
  28. You know this Dr. Who spin-off aims to please when the return of Capt. Jack Harkness (John Barrowman) isn't even the big news.... With [Capt.] John [James Marsters] adding such a fun, unhinged element, it's a shame these two crazy kids broke up in the first place.
  29. If Brotherhood isn't as brilliant as The Wire, it's just as believable. The cast is so solid.
  30. The sheer number of plotlines can be overwhelming, but the images--flowers dropped on the side of the road, a dusty van sliding away--are relentlessly riveting. And the series only gets better from here. [5 Oct 2007, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  31. The mystery of just what happened to the child unspools almost languidly against the backdrop of wild and gorgeous New Zealand country. The ugliness of humans amid such beauty resounds like a cold slap.
  32. The film is a wonderful trip down the magazine's fabulosity-paved memory lane.
  33. Everwood ain't brain surgery, but that's also what helps make it an easygoing charmer.
  34. This portrait of a profane, low-down egomaniac--excuse me, he prefers "Christ figure"--continues to amaze. McBride's willingness to play depression, amorality, and selfishness for laughs is awesome.
  35. The Jinx might make amateur sleuths of us all. But judging by this gripping, stranger-than-fiction detective story, Jarecki’s the real thing.
  36. Such a nice surprise: A sharply written show about a mother-daughter relationship filled with vibrant emotions instead of cheap sarcasm.
  37. The series shows the darker side of Belle's work without getting into that porno-punishing crap so often disguised as morality lessons. The series, like Belle, is far too smart to succumb to such an average attitude.
  38. The stunningly shot result will make you wonder at the cruel beauty of nature. [16 Mar 2012, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  39. Who says TV doesn't make history thought-provokingly exciting?
  40. This political satire operates at a level of sharpness that American television hasn't seen since Robert Altman's HBO miniseries Tanner '88.
  41. All this tension turns out to be great for the show's pulse, which had been fluttering last season. In too many of season 7's adventures, Duchovny and Anderson looked as if they'd been asked to go investigate who shot J.R. Ewing; their boredom was showing. ... [This season's first two episodes discover] a new force field of energy.
  42. It's a very funny show about how hard it is realizing you've become a cliché: the useless husband, the naggy wife, the insufferable couple on the sitcom.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    In the second go-round for Seinfeld, the star seems more relaxed and confident, and there's a bracing snap to the byplay between him and his costars.
  43. The jail's real breakout stars remain Lee Tergesen and J.K. Simmons as Tobias Beecher and Vern Schillinger.
  44. It's the fall season's most intriguing, tense puzzler.
  45. This excellent six-part series brings the statesman's [Thomas Cromwell's] shady story to light with wit, empathy, and even surprise. [3 Apr 2015, p.59]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The first of Mad Men’s final seven episodes is as fine as a silky fur, give or take a hilariously hideous period mustache and some too-on-the-nose lines and symbolism.
  46. Keri Russell's title character is one of the few interesting characters on television who's also purely good ... It is one of the great strengths of this series that sap and sentiment are explored with varying degrees of realism, humor, and seriousness that lesser shows shrink from even attempting.
  47. It's a smart show that plays dumb at first, just to get your attention. Masters may not yet be as groundbreaking as the true drama that inspired it. But like Betty, it knows how to fake it until things get real.
  48. It's Quantum Leap meets The Streets of San Francisco--with narry a C, S, or I in sight. [28 Jul 2006, p.56]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  49. A trite, untrue mental-illness mystery insults the show's high IQ, but doesn't diminish the opener's capture-the-imagination thesis: that a redeemed House can be just as compelling as a rude House.
  50. Cosmos captures the imagination anew by celebrating imagination itself as an essential tool for a deeper, more truthful understanding of life. [7 Mar 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  51. While pop-culture touchstones from Dallas to Twin Peaks shrivel up and die, L.A. Law just keeps getting juicier.
  52. Sherman-Palladino writes in such a distinctive 'voice' that denying her the same kind of artistic credit that, say, Aaron Sorkin or David Chase take as their due only hints at the unspoken sexism in the television industry and the press.
  53. With Rescue Me, [Leary] redeems himself by doing what we always suspected he could do: really act.
  54. Thanks to frequent backstabbing, heavy-handed symbolism, and Spacey’s deliciously hammy performance, House of Cards works best as a mordantly funny melodrama.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Kroll's an incredible small-screen Sybil, and you'd be nuts not to tune in for his last hurrah. [16 Jan 2015, p.69]
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Thank you, HBO, for airing Australia's outrageous Office-like, eight-part high school mockumentary, rather than getting a lesser comedian to do an American version.
  55. The continued ooey-gooey goodness of TV's best family drama is particularly satisfying tonight, spotlighting story lines from the underutilized Joel (Sam Jaeger) and the oddly interesting Crosby (Dax Shepard).
  56. It's grim but exhilarating: a portrait of an artist chronicling despair.
  57. Paying close attention to SOA's array of outlaws makes the series an even more richly detailed portrait of self-righteous villainy.
  58. MasterChef Junior exults in the joy of cooking, the joy of childhood, and the joy of treating people decently.
  59. Terrific ... It's often witty and exhilarating, and most of this material isn't kid stuff. ... With all this artistry crammed into a half-hour chunk each week, Liquid Television certainly entertains, but it also does something that MTV isn't exactly famous for: It provokes thought.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    They're at their ridiculous best.
  60. Any fears you had that marriage and a baby would dull the sharp edge of Dexter--I admit it, I was worried--have been thoroughly allayed by season 4's wonderfully swift, witty, and violent start.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Hipper than Saturday Night Live, cooler than Arsenio Hall, filled with more pop references than The Andy Warhol Diaries, MST is the perfect postmodern comedy.
  61. I was worried the departure of Bethenny (who's living happily Ever After) would cripple these Housewives beyond repair. No need to fret! There's still plenty of delicious drama flowing from the NYC grid thanks to oversexed Sonja, bulging-eyed winemaker Ramona, and blonder 'n' bitchier Alex.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It's clever [and] a little dark. [29 Sep 2006, p.72]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  62. An utterly absorbing nighttime soap ... Really, if you're not watching 'Everwood,' you're not missing a guilty pleasure: You're missing pure pleasure.
  63. Think Big Love-meets-Carnivale and you're in the ballpark, but The Riches boasts its own weird, violent, druggy, hilarious mix. [16 Mar 2007, p.63]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  64. About Face is raucous and lovely. [3 Aug 2012, p.69]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  65. What makes Veronica so strangely touching is that on a larger scale, her quest mirrors the common teen conundrum: My family's screwed up, and I'm not cool enough. How can I fix it?
  66. The lack of polish makes Vice all the more riveting. [5 Apr 2013, p.63]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  67. The result is a compelling portrait of a man who was, in every sense, incendiary.
  68. When the series premiered in July, 'Reno' looked like a one- or two-joke stunt, a smartly sustained 'Saturday Night Live' sketch. ... As this series has evolved, its format has proven remarkably expansive and emotionally rich, using parodic elements to explore these characters and place them precisely in a social environment.
  69. Giancarlo Esposito's Gus will prove once again that he is the most shockingly unknowable of villains. Yes, Breaking Bad is back, and bent on upending every expectation you bring to it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    For such a quick-witted comedy, the eight episode commentaries aren't as sharp as you'd expect, and Carell is entirely absent. But some three hours of deleted scenes--funnier takes of already hilarious sequences, beefed-up stories for the supporting cast--compensate.
  70. This season, The West Wing has finally figured out what it's about: an administration trying to hold on to power, thwart its foes, and accomplish its mission.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  71. You'll be pining for more once it's over. [1 Mar 2013, p.62]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  72. Inoculated against hype and its backlash on the strength of fortified plotting and unshowy acting, ER continues to make good on its initial stylistic breakthroughs. Which is to say, all the speedy razzle-dazzle hasn't gone lame yet.
  73. It's a blast to watch Deschanel walk the line between broad comedy and complex emotion with growing scientific precision.
  74. L&O's been having a sleek, swift season.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Bialik manages to steal scenes from Parsons as if she's been with the crew since, well, the big bang.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Tommy Lee Jones masterfully directs Cormac McCarthy's ferocious two-man play.
  75. One of TV's few rock-solid sitcoms. ... The paradox of W&G -- its marvel and its trap -- is that it revolves endlessly around the same four people (Eric McCormack's Will, Messing's Grace, Hayes' Jack, and Megan Mullally's swizzle-stick-sarcastic Karen) in essentially the same locale: Will and Grace's apartment, with occasional visits to Grace's interior-design office.
  76. If you're looking for the season's smartest, most comfy and engaging new thriller, 'Sisco' is it.
  77. Breaking Bad has, in short, everything you could want from an hour-long show: suspense, laughs, danger, and poignance.
  78. The new season pops with all the visual energy of the first. [4 May 2012, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  79. The setup is slow, but the show captures shadowy Coulson, sarcastic Grant (Brett Dalton), combat vet Melinda May (Ming-Na Wen), and Fitz (Iain De Caestecker) and Simmons (Elizabeth Henstridge), whose superpower is Britishness. Bonus points for wry dialogue by co-creator Joss Whedon. [20/27 Sep 2013, p.144]
  80. Last season, it took me a while to get used to the shambling pace imposed by the show's improv strategy, but by now, Curb's inventive riffing is like good jazz music.
  81. If Team Forte can sustain the ingenuity, surprises, and craftsmanship, The Last Man on Earth, a profoundly funny comedy about the least funny of things--loneliness--might live long and prosper.
  82. In a recent interview, Apatow said that he cast Undeclared before writing the pilot, which may be a key reason why the show is so cohesive: Apatow and his staff had specific acting rhythms in mind, resulting in a show that, right from the pilot, radiates a sure sense of each character's quirks.
  83. It's a beautiful mess. Don't miss it. [29 Nov 2013, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  84. This very British series is refreshing in that it's actually about the food; watching a dozen hopefuls bake up trifles while maintaining their dignity turns out to be a delight. [26 Dec 2014/2 Jan 2015, p.113]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  85. The show was created by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler, but it's Soderbergh's vision, from the brilliant but unusual score (minimalist electronic music) to the wry camera angles (the series opens on Owen's shoes as he lounges in a brothel). For a period piece, it's strikingly contemporary--and quite gory, although the surgery scenes never feel gratuitous.
  86. The duo's hilariously awkward chemistry get even stronger abroad... and in prison. [26 Dec 2014/2 Jan 2015, p.112]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  87. Most TV series feel the need to up the ante in their second season, to prove the first one wasn't a fluke. Justified proceeds with such assurance, however, that it can maintain a cool, witty serenity that only enhances its tough-guy drama.
  88. Maybe it's the fact that Rach is six months pregnant (and looks like she ate a bagel, at most), but the crazed stylist's show has an extra bolt of energy this season.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The show's best tension comes from the awesome/awful self-awareness that plagues the directors as they attempt to make a film while being very much filmed themselves.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    MG is wonderfully absurd and the supporting cast is satisfyingly straight-faced. [21 Mar 2008, p.53]
    • Entertainment Weekly

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